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# "Science Wire" gives access to latest science news from research centers and R&D companies.
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Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
10:01
’Office life’ of bacteria may be their weak spot
A research team in the University’s Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology has identified for the first time how the “paper shredder” that keeps the bacteria E. coli on top of its day job works. Now the group are looking for ways to jam the mechanism and leave E. coli and similar bacteria in filing hell.
Life Sciences
10:01
Peacock’s train is not such a drag
The magnificent plumage of the peacock may not be quite the sacrifice to love that it appears to be, University of Leeds researchers have discovered. Dr Graham Askew, from the University’s School of Biomedical Sciences , filmed five Indian peacocks taking off using two high-speed video cameras to try to work out what price male birds pay for carrying the spectacular iridescent feathers they use in displays to attract females.
Life Sciences - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
07:02
X-ray vision puts Nottingham plant and soil sciences on the world stage
PA 232/14 A multidisciplinary team of scientists at The University of Nottingham are using some of the most advanced X-ray micro Computed Tomography (CT) scanners to learn how to design plant roots so they can interact better with soil and capture water and nutrients more efficiently.
Arts and Design - Computer Science/Telecom
18.09.2014
Keeping score
Keeping score
One of the most successful composers of late 14th-century Italy was an unusual figure named Zachara da Teramo.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.09.2014
Penn Muscle Institute Biologists Receive $9 Million to Research Cellular Motors
Penn Medicine and The Wistar Institute have been awarded a prestigious $12.1 million SPORE grant from the National Cancer Institute.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
17.09.2014
First volunteer receives new Ebola vaccine in UK trial
The first healthy UK volunteer has received a candidate Ebola vaccine in Oxford today in a safety trial carried out by the University of Oxford.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.09.2014
For some lung cancer patients, surgery may yield better long-term results
Patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are otherwise healthy fare better over time if they undergo conventional surgery versus less-invasive radiosurgery to remove their cancer, according to a Yale study. The findings are scheduled to be presented at the 56 th annual conference of the American Society for Radiation Oncology in San Francisco.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Agronomy/Food Science
17.09.2014
Improving the health and wellbeing of young Bristolians
Press release issued: 17 September 2014 A new project to improve the health of children across Bristol gets underway this month as experts from across the city join forces to tackle the inequalities faced by 20,000 youngsters living in poverty.
Medicine/Pharmacology
17.09.2014
Helping carers of brain injury patients
  A unique online resource has been launched for family members and others involved in the care of people with severe forms of brain injury.
Environmental Sciences - Law/Forensics
17.09.2014
UCLA, Berkeley law schools examine emerging market for used electric vehicle batteries
Second-life batteries from electric vehicles could provide businesses and homes with backup power while lowering electricity costs for owners.
Life Sciences - Business/Economics
17.09.2014
Working with Business: Skalene Limited
The University of Liverpool is working with a business which is developing an automated system to reduce the time spent on the painstaking procedure of DNA sample preparation. The project which involves Skalene Limited , the University's Centre for Genomic Research is designed to produce the best possible samples from small quantities of swabs and to remove as much of the human labour as possible in the process.
Life Sciences
17.09.2014
Plant engineered for more efficient photosynthesis
Plant engineered for more efficient photosynthesis
A genetically engineered tobacco plant, developed with two genes from blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), holds promise for improving the yields of many food crops.
Medicine/Pharmacology
17.09.2014
UCLA doctors prepared to treat infectious disease patients if needed
UCLA Dr. Zachary Rubin, infection disease expert at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, holds protective gear that would protect hospital workers in case someone with Ebola or other deadly infectious disease should arrive in the ER for treatment.
Business/Economics - Environmental Sciences
17.09.2014
Significant Declines in Price of Rooftop and Utility-Scale Solar
Berkeley, CA - The price of solar energy in the United States continues to fall substantially, according to the latest editions of two annual reports produced by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).
Earth Sciences
17.09.2014
Engineer wins MacArthur fellowship
Engineer wins MacArthur fellowship
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Tami Bond , a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been awarded a 2014 MacArthur Fellowship , commonly known as a “genius grant,” from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.
Physics/Materials Science - Architecture
17.09.2014
Popular Science puts U-M engineer on Brilliant Ten list
ANN ARBOR-A University of Michigan engineering professor whose work on energy scavenging sensors that could help herald the Internet of Things has been honored by a national magazine.
Event - Social Sciences
17.09.2014
Myriam Denov awarded Trudeau Fellowship
There are thousands of children born of war-time rape worldwide, but very little is known about their lived experiences and their relationships with their families and communities.
History/Archeology - Business/Economics
17.09.2014
U-M professor in Scotland to witness historic independence vote
U-M professor in Scotland to witness historic independence vote
ANN ARBOR-The Scottish referendum on Sept. 18 is a huge deal. If voters decide to split from the U.K., a major world power and key U.S. ally could be significantly weakened, losing a third of its land mass.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
17.09.2014
UCLA Health System, Anthem Blue Cross join L.A. and Orange County partners to launch Vivity
UCLA Health System, Anthem Blue Cross join L.A. and Orange County partners to launch Vivity
Unique product created by insurer and 7 health systems uniquely aligns care for Southern California members Dale Tate The UCLA Health System and six other top hospital systems in Los Angeles and
Life Sciences - Chemistry
17.09.2014
Gel-like padding being developed at Stanford could help cells survive injection, heal spinal cord injuries
A team of Bio-X scientists is developing a gel to help protect cells from the trauma of being injected into an injury site.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Sport Sciences
17.09.2014
The "hidden injury" in sports
Star receiver Charles-Antoine Sinotte suffered a concussion during his last home game for the McGill Redmen in 2010.
Agronomy/Food Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.09.2014
Global importance of pollinators underestimated
Declines in populations of pollinators, such as bees and wasps, may be a key threat to nutrition in some of the most poorly fed parts of the globe, according to new research. A major study, published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B and co-authored by a University of Leeds academic, looked at the importance of pollinators to 115 of the most common food crops worldwide and the importance of those crops in delivering vital nutrients to vulnerable populations.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.09.2014
Engineers recruit bacteria as partners in innovation
Harvard team lays the foundation for using bacterial biofilms to produce new self-healing materials and bioprocessing technologies Cambridge/Boston, Mass.
Life Sciences - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
17.09.2014
Engineer Danielle Bassett Receives 2014 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship
The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced Wednesday that the University of Pennsylvania's Danielle S. Bassett has been selected as a 2014 MacArthur Fellow.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.09.2014
Novartis presents oncology research advances with new data on Zykadia(TM), Afinitor and key pipeline compounds at ESMO 2014
Latest Zykadia data in patients with ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer, including updated brain metastases analysis from pivotal trial Final overall survival data from Phase III trial of Afini
Business/Economics - Event
17.09.2014
Earth Sciences
17.09.2014
What set the Earth’s plates in motion?
What set the Earth's plates in motion? 17 September 2014 An 87 million year long story. This shows an early buoyant continent slowly spreading toward the adjacent immobile plate (blue).
Chemistry - Literature/Linguistics
17.09.2014
“Airpocalypse” explained
“Airpocalypse” explained
Media Releases Environment Energy and Environment The causes of China's record level fine particulate pollution in winter 2013 At the beginning of 2013 a greyish-brown blanket of smog lay over large areas of China for several months. The fine particle pollution was higher by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude than the levels normally measured in Western Europe and the United States.
Medicine/Pharmacology
17.09.2014
Pollution risks of megacity 'street canyons' examined in unique new research
People living in Hong Kong's towering skyscrapers may be away from the hustle and bustle of its notorious traffic-snarled streets but the effects of traffic emissions should not be ignored, says a ground-breaking research project led by King's College London. Researchers are investigating how much of the toxic exhaust fumes at street level are, in fact, still reaching residents living inside high-rise buildings hundreds of feet above.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.09.2014
World Alzheimer Report 2014: Evidence for dementia risk reduction
Dementia risk for populations can be modified through tobacco control and better prevention, detection and control of hypertension and diabetes. The World Alzheimer Report 2014 ‘Dementia and Risk Reduction: An analysis of protective and modifiable factors', released today, calls for dementia to be integrated into both global and national public health programmes alongside other major non communicable diseases (NCDs).
Careers/Employment - Business/Economics
17.09.2014
Hacking for good
Hacking for good
Hacking is often done with malicious intent. But the two MIT alumni who co-founded fast-growing startup Tinfoil Security have shown that hacking can be put to good use: improving security.
Life Sciences - Arts and Design
17.09.2014
Art meets science in the Queensland outback
The untouched beauty of Queensland's Idalia National Park has inspired a series of works by emerging artist Elisa Jane Carmichael , currently on display at The University of Queensland.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
17.09.2014
Shrink-wrapping spacesuits
Shrink-wrapping spacesuits
For future astronauts, the process of suiting up may go something like this: Instead of climbing into a conventional, bulky, gas-pressurized suit, an astronaut may don a lightweight, stretchy garment, lined with tiny, musclelike coils.
Medicine/Pharmacology
17.09.2014
Nanopatch to help WHO battle polio
Nanopatch to help WHO battle polio
The World Health Organisation's (WHO) battle against polio has a new weapon after joining forces with Vaxxas , the biotechnology company responsible for developing revolutionary vaccine delivery method the Nanopatch.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
16.09.2014
Researchers use liquid inks to create better solar cells
Solar cell film made from kesterite or perovskite absorbs energy more efficiently and is cheaper to manufacture Shaun Mason The basic function of solar cells is to harvest sunlight and turn it into electricity. Thus, it is critically important that the film that collects the light on the surface of the cell is designed for the best energy absorption.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
16.09.2014
Toward optical chips
Toward optical chips
Chips that use light, rather than electricity, to move data would consume much less power - and energy efficiency is a growing concern as chips' transistor counts rise.
Medicine/Pharmacology
16.09.2014
Laser focus on treatment costs vs. value: less radiation for elderly women with early breast cancer
In a healthcare climate where the costs of treatment are increasingly weighed against potential benefit, a Yale study has found that radiation oncologists are using fewer or less-aggressive radiation procedures on elderly women with early-stage breast cancer.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
16.09.2014
Nanosurf - An Atomic Force Microscope Manufacturer in Baselland
Nanosurf is a company based in Liestal which has been developing and manufacturing unique scanning probe microscopes for almost two decades.
Social Sciences - Administration/Government
16.09.2014
Scottish people most sceptical on fracking, survey shows
If Scotland votes for independence later this week, its Government could face an uphill challenge in in persuading the Scottish people that fracking is necessary, research has revealed.
Computer Science/Telecom
16.09.2014
Cyber security expert Chris Hankin recounts a long and varied career at Imperial
Cyber security expert Chris Hankin recounts a long and varied career at Imperial
Professor Chris Hankin, Director of the Institute for Security Science and Technology, looks back over 30 years at Imperial College.
Astronomy
16.09.2014
Hands-free in space and under water
16 September 2014 ESA astronaut Andreas Mogensen is looking forward to flying to the International Space Station next year but until yesterday he was underwater trying out a handy new device he will use in space.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
16.09.2014
Stanford bioengineers develop a toolkit for designing more successful synthetic molecules
Stanford bioengineers develop a toolkit for designing more successful synthetic molecules
Synthetic molecules hold great potential for revealing key processes that occur in cells, but the trial-and-error approach to their design has limited their effectiveness.
Physics/Materials Science
16.09.2014
Twisted graphene chills out
16 Sep 2014 When two sheets of graphene are stacked in a special way, it is possible to cool down the graphene with a laser instead of heating it up, University of Manchester researchers have shown. In an article published in Nano Letters , a multi-national team of scientists including Dr. Aravind Vijayaraghavan from Manchester, Prof. Ado Jorio from Belo Horizonte in Brazil and Prof. Lukas Novotny from Zurich have shown how laser light interacts with a special kind of graphene to cool it down.
Law/Forensics - History/Archeology
16.09.2014
Fancy pants: skirmishes with the fashion police in 16th-century Italy
With the autumn 2014 fashion shows in full swing, all eyes are on the top designers. In 16th-century Italy, the latest looks didn't always go down well with the authorities.
Life Sciences - Environmental Sciences
16.09.2014
Spy on penguin families for science
Online volunteers are being asked to classify images of penguin families to help scientists monitor the health of penguin colonies in Antarctica.
History/Archeology - Computer Science/Telecom
16.09.2014
Capturing Ancient Maya Sites from Both a Rat’s and a ’Bat’s Eye View’
Researchers from the University of Southern California, UC San Diego and the University of Texas, Austin, collaborated on archaeological field work at El Zotz Photo by Toby Savage Photography.
Physics/Materials Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.09.2014
Clerk, Pai named to RSC’s College of New Scholars
McGill University physicist Aashish Clerk and epidemiologist Madhukar Pai are among the inaugural members named today to the Royal Society of Canada's College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.09.2014
Alzheimer’s funding boost for Manchester scientist
16 Sep 2014 A dementia researcher based at The University of Manchester and Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has landed a £30k award from Alzheimer's Research UK for a pioneering research project getting underway this month. September is World Alzheimer's Month and will see Dr Richard Unwin start an innovative project studying thousands of proteins in the brain to build a molecular map of what happens in Alzheimer's disease.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.09.2014
New funding offers hope in the battle against pancreatic cancer
16 Sep 2014 The national charity Pancreatic Cancer UK has announced an award of over £74,000 to Dr. Cathy Tournier at The University of Manchester as part of its second annual round of Research Innovation Fund (RIF) grants, amounting to half a million pounds. Dr Tournier and her colleagues will be leading a project to investigate the behaviour of pancreatic cells and the processes that change them from normal cells into those which grow rapidly, ultimately destroying the normal function of the pancreas.
Life Sciences
16.09.2014
Can genetic tug of war explain autism and schizophrenia?
The size of babies and even human behavior may be shaped during early fetal development by a molecular tug of war between paternal and maternal genes, according to an emerging theory in evolutionary biology.
Medicine/Pharmacology
16.09.2014
UCLA physicians now available via LiveHealth Online
UCLA physicians now available via LiveHealth Online
Doctors from UCLA Health System will be available on your smartphone, tablet or laptop beginning this week through LiveHealth Online , a telehealth solution for business travelers, busy parents, stud
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
16.09.2014
For electronics beyond silicon, a new contender emerges
New transistor achieves 'colossal' switchable resistance using quantum materials and physics developed in a fuel cell lab Silicon has few serious competitors as the material of choice in the electronics industry. Yet transistors, the switchable valves that control the flow of electrons in a circuit, cannot simply keep shrinking to meet the needs of powerful, compact devices; physical limitations like energy consumption and heat dissipation are too significant.
Event - Chemistry
16.09.2014
Ceremony celebrates our research stars
Ceremony celebrates our research stars
Seven researchers and two research supervisors from across The University of Queensland were honoured at an excellence awards ceremony this evening.
Life Sciences - Social Sciences
16.09.2014
Human faces are so variable because we evolved to look unique
Human faces are so variable because we evolved to look unique
The amazing variety of human faces - far greater than that of most other animals - is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study by University of California, Berkeley, scientists. Our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend, said behavioral ecologist Michael J. Sheehan, a postdoctoral fellow in UC Berkeley's Museum of Vertebrate Zoology.
Chemistry - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
16.09.2014
How to hide like an octopus
How to hide like an octopus
Cephalopods, which include octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish, are among nature's most skillful camouflage artists, able to change both the color and texture of their skin within seconds to blend into their surroundings - a capability that engineers have long struggled to duplicate in synthetic materials.
Computer Science/Telecom
16.09.2014
Story of WW1 volunteers from St. Helens revealed in new book
16 Sep 2014 The full behind the scenes story of 3,000 men from St. Helens who fought in the First World War is uncovered in a book being launched this month.
Administration/Government
16.09.2014
Medicine/Pharmacology - Agronomy/Food Science
16.09.2014
Dental and nutrition experts call for radical rethink on free sugars intake
Dental and nutrition experts call for radical rethink on free sugars intake
Sugars in the diet should make up no more than 3% of total energy intake to reduce the significant financial and social burdens of tooth decay, finds new research from UCL and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.
Medicine/Pharmacology
16.09.2014
College of Nursing creates Program for Person-Centered Living Systems of Care
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Penn State's College of Nursing has partnered with the Polisher Research Institute (PRI) in North Wales, Pennsylvania, to establish a Program for Person-Centered Living Systems of Care.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
16.09.2014
Advanced molecular 'sieves' could be used for carbon capture
Researchers from the University of Cambridge have developed advanced molecular 'sieves' which could be used to filter carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.
Medicine/Pharmacology
16.09.2014
Good vibrations for Forth Road Bridge
As celebrations marking the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Forth Road Bridge take place this month, a team of Cambridge engineers are preparing to deploy state-of-the-art self-powered wireless sensors which could help monitor and protect the Scottish landmark well into the future.
Administration/Government
16.09.2014
Sport Sciences - Event
16.09.2014
New era for ’The Pavvy’ - Melbourne University’s heritage sports pavilion
A new facility to support sporting excellence at the University of Melbourne has been officially opened by Victorian Governor Alex Chernov.
Business/Economics - Careers/Employment
16.09.2014
Making the case for Keynes
Making the case for Keynes
In 1919, when the victors of World War I were concluding their settlement against Germany - in the form of the Treaty of Versailles - one of the leading British representatives at the negotiations angrily resigned his position, believing the debt imposed on the losers would be too harsh.
Medicine/Pharmacology
16.09.2014
Balance benefits baby boomers: reduce your risk of falls
Balance benefits baby boomers: reduce your risk of falls 16 September 2014 If you are over 65 and have had a fall before, researchers at the University of Sydney think you should balance on one leg to brush your teeth, bend your knees to pack the dishwasher and take the stairs more often.
Law/Forensics - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.09.2014
Change laws to exempt unwell doctors from mandatory reporting
Change laws to exempt unwell doctors from mandatory reporting 16 September 2014 Medico-legal experts who are calling for legislative changes exempting doctors from mandatory reporting, say c
Literature/Linguistics - Social Sciences
16.09.2014
UQ Art Museum showcases 30 years of Lindy Lee
UQ Art Museum showcases 30 years of Lindy Lee
A new exhibition at The University of Queensland Art Museum will examine artist Lindy Lee's contribution to Australian art over the past three decades in the first major survey of her work.
Physics/Materials Science - Social Sciences
16.09.2014
Q&A: John Durant and David Kaiser on spurring public interest in science
Q&A: John Durant and David Kaiser on spurring public interest in science
What are the best ways to get the general public interested in science? Last year a large MIT workshop convened dozens of scientists, artists, bloggers, citizen-scientists, and journalists to examine new grassroots forms through which people are engaging with science.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.09.2014
Health Sciences Digest: Wearable Artificial Kidney, worker wellness, chromosome sort safeguard
Health Sciences Digest: Wearable Artificial Kidney, worker wellness, chromosome sort safeguard
University of Washington Wearable Artificial Kidney safety testing receives go-ahead Medical researchers have received approval to begin safety and performance testing of the Wearable Artificial Kidney, a small dialysis machine that can be worn on the body.
Physics/Materials Science
15.09.2014
Cornell theorists continue the search for supersymmetry
Cornell theorists continue the search for supersymmetry
It was a breakthrough with profound implications for the world as we know it: the Higgs boson, the elementary particle that gives all other particles their mass, discovered at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. For many scientists, it's only the beginning. When the LHC fires up again in 2015 at its highest-ever collision energy, theorists like Csaba Csaki, Cornell professor of physics, will be watching.
Law/Forensics
15.09.2014
Congressional Budget Office director: Spending can't last
Congressional Budget Office director: Spending can't last
Douglas Elmendorf, director of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), focused on shifting priorities in the federal budget driven by the Affordable Care Act in a Sept.
History/Archeology
15.09.2014
"Astonishingly" well-preserved mummy found
One of Europe's most well-preserved 17th century mummies has been discovered in Lund, Sweden. Researchers at Lund University now hope it will shed some light on the medical and historical mysteries of everyday life in the 1600s.
Literature/Linguistics
15.09.2014
Collaborative bid for Obama Presidential Library selected for next phase
The Barack Obama Foundation announced on Sept. 15 that the collaborative effort led by the University of Chicago to bring the Obama Presidential Library to Chicago's South Side has been selected for the final round in the foundation's site selection process.
Environmental Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
15.09.2014
"Femme fatale" emerald ash borer decoy lures and kills males
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. An international team of researchers has designed decoys that mimic female emerald ash borer beetles and successfully entice male emerald ash borers to land on them in an attempt to mate, only to be electrocuted and killed by high-voltage current.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Computer Science/Telecom
15.09.2014
First Oxford India Lecture highlights role of ’smart health’
Mobile phones and smart devices will have a large role to play in improving access to healthcare and involving patients more in their own treatment, a leading Oxford University academic has said in a lecture in New Delhi.
Arts and Design - History/Archeology
15.09.2014
A private art collection becomes a Stanford collection on Sunday, Sept. 21
A private art collection becomes a Stanford collection on Sunday, Sept. 21
The Anderson Collection at Stanford University welcomes museum members and the public this weekend. This weekend Stanford will officially become home to 
the core of the Anderson Collection, one of the world's most outstanding private assemblies of post–World War II American art.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.09.2014
Three biotech companies from Basel report good half year results
The first half of 2014 has been a good one for Santhera, Basilea and Evolva. All three report encouraging numbers and results and have an optimistic perspective for the year 2014. Santhera's stock has been increasing by 4200%, or 2600% since the beginning of 2014. Investors' appetite for Santhera shares is driven by the temporary approval of Roxanone in France for treating patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and especially also by positive phase III data for Roxanone in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).
Philosophy - Psychology
15.09.2014
Moral violations: hard to stomach? Hard to swallow?
It's common to refer to acts of business fraud or misbehaving politicians as disgusting, but according to new research being morally offended is not just a manner of speech. What we find morally offensive can be physically offensive as well. The study, led by University of Toronto Scarborough and Rotman School of Management Assistant Professor Cindy Chan , revealed that people are less likely to consume beverages if they are exposed to moral violations.
Architecture
15.09.2014
Renewing a place of faith
Renewing a place of faith
Singular and cylindrical, iconic and graceful, the MIT Chapel (W15) has served the Institute community for close to six decades - and is now the focus of a substantial renewal effort that begins today, Monday, Sept. 15.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.09.2014
Think big! Bacteria breach cell division size limit
The life of a cell is straightforward: it doubles, divides in the middle and originates two identical daughter cells.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.09.2014
Research in the News: Setting a course for genomic islands
Yale University scientists are exploring uncharted genomic islands to study new chemistry between bacteria and their hosts, from invertebrates to humans. One such discovery, by assistant professor of chemistry Jason Crawford and postdoctoral researcher Xun Guo, is published in the journal Chemistry & Biology.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
15.09.2014
Colourful carbon monoxide sensor could help save lives
Colourful carbon monoxide sensor could help save lives
Scientists have designed a new carbon monoxide sensor that uses a strip which changes from orange to white when it senses the poisonous gas. The sensor is very sensitive and can detect even low levels of carbon monoxide (CO). Under an ultraviolet lamp, the strip also fluoresces allowing even lower levels of CO to be detected.
Business/Economics
15.09.2014
Hackathon showcases smart content search engine
Hackathon showcases smart content search engine
At the Big Red//Hacks event Sept. 26-28 - billed as the first student-run, large-scale hackathon at Cornell University - participants will have access to a semantic intelligence application program interfaceAPI, the core technology for a new startup, Speare.
Environmental Sciences - Event
15.09.2014
Responding and adapting to climate change
Press release issued: 15 September 2014 How should we address the scientific, cultural, health, and social issues arising from climate change when there is uncertainty about its effects? Experts from around the world will meet in Bristol this month to discuss how best to respond to climate change in an uncertain world.
Astronomy
15.09.2014
’J’ marks the spot for Rosetta’s lander
15 September 2014 Rosetta's lander Philae will target Site J, an intriguing region on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko that offers unique scientific potential, with hints of activity nearby, and minimum risk to the lander compared to the other candidate sites.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Computer Science/Telecom
15.09.2014
Reducing traffic congestion, remotely
At the Intelligent Transportation Systems World Congress last week, MIT researchers received one of the best-paper awards for a new system, dubbed RoadRunner, that uses GPS-style turn-by-turn directions to route drivers around congested roadways.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.09.2014
Collaboration drives achievement in protein structure research
Collaboration drives achievement in protein structure research
By tracking down how bacterial defense systems work, the scientists can potentially fight infectious diseases and genetic disorders. "It is tremendously exciting working with researchers around the world, helping them apply the software and algorithms that we have developed to see the inner workings of molecular machines," said Thomas Terwilliger, a senior Los Alamos scientist and Laboratory Fellow.
Computer Science/Telecom - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
15.09.2014
Bound for robotic glory
Bound for robotic glory
Speed and agility are hallmarks of the cheetah: The big predator is the fastest land animal on Earth, able to accelerate to 60 mph in just a few seconds.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.09.2014
Expect more deadly pandemics
Expect more deadly pandemics 15 September 2014 Australia should upgrade its infectious disease control capabilities by adopting a US-style Centers of Disease Control, according to a University of Sydney expert who warns that the world will see more frequent epidemics.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering
15.09.2014
Event - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.09.2014
Event - Arts and Design
15.09.2014
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.09.2014
Slimy Fish and the Origins of Brain Development
Slimy Fish and the Origins of Brain Development
Lamprey-slimy, eel-like parasitic fish with tooth-riddled, jawless sucking mouths-are rather disgusting to look at, but thanks to their important position on the vertebrate family tree, they can offer important insights about the evolutionary history of our own brain development, a recent study suggests.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.09.2014
Muscular dystrophy: Repair the muscles, not the genetic defect
Muscular dystrophy: Repair the muscles, not the genetic defect
Contact Suzanne Tainter, (734) 647-3437, stainter [a] umich (p) edu or Laura Bailey, (735) 647-1848, baileylm [a] umich (p) edu ANN ARBOR-A potential way to treat muscular dystrophy directly targets muscle repair instead of the underlying genetic defect that usually leads to the disease.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
13.09.2014
Novartis demonstrates leadership in ophthalmology with new products and over 40 abstracts at EURETINA
Retrospective analysis of US claims data suggests risk of endophthalmitis is 65% higher in patients treated with aflibercept than those treated with Lucentis Presentations discuss safety o
Arts and Design
12.09.2014
Jekyll and Hyde thrills new generation
  Visitors to the Cheltenham Literature Festival in October will be among the first to experience a cult horror story in a completely new way thanks to a creative project that builds on the latest
Astronomy
12.09.2014
The long descent
12 September 2014 ESA's five 'cavenauts' and their instructors are set to explore the caves of Sardinia, Italy, where they will live and work during their six-day stay.
Astronomy
12.09.2014
Where to land?
Since ESA's Rosetta spacecraft arrived at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on 6 August, the race has been on to find a suitable location for the lander Philae.
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
12.09.2014
Rapid UK population growth undermines living standards – but may be necessary for economic growth
Home > News > News releases > Rapid UK population growth undermines living standards – but may be necessary for economic growth Link between population growth and economic growth in the UK appears to have weakened, University of Sheffield report finds.
Life Sciences
12.09.2014
Project prepares collection for 21st-century challenge of invasive species
Kenneth Cameron, director of the Wisconsin State Herbarium, examines a dried specimen of purple loosestrife, one of the invasive Great Lakes plants being digitized with support from the National Scie
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
12.09.2014
Stanford Professor Robert Schimke, a pioneer in biomedical sciences, dies at 81
Stanford Professor Robert Schimke, a pioneer in biomedical sciences, dies at 81
Robert Schimke, professor emeritus of biology, discovered several key cellular mechanisms, including gene amplification, which has become a foundation of cancer research and drug development.
Business/Economics
12.09.2014
Not just cool - it’s a gas
12 September 2014 In space, a new way of producing gas is being tested for steering satellites. On Earth, it is now fighting fires without harming the environment - and business insiders say it could be revolutionary.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
12.09.2014
Stanford’s Karl Deisseroth wins Keio Prize
An idea that started as a long shot - using light to control the activity of the brain - has earned Karl Deisseroth the Keio prize in medicine.
Life Sciences - Social Sciences
12.09.2014
Taking the 'sting' out of reproduction
Female parasitic wasps have more reproductive success when working together with other females, which can also explain sex biased reproduction, according to new research. In a collaborative study , scientists from The University of Nottingham's School of Biosciences , and from Nanjing Agricultural University and the Forest Academy of Jiangsu Province in China, looked at the social behaviour of parasitic wasps to find out how successfully they reproduce when operating alone, in the presence of another female or when part of a larger group.
Medicine/Pharmacology
12.09.2014
New actions to address the north-south health divide
New actions to address the north-south health divide
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Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
12.09.2014
McGill-led projects awarded Brain Canada grants
Four innovative projects led by McGill University researchers have been selected to receive major grants under the Canada Brain Research Fund.
Astronomy
12.09.2014
Gaia discovers its first supernova
While scanning the sky to measure the positions and movements of stars in our Galaxy, Gaia has discovered its first stellar explosion in another galaxy far, far away. As Gaia goes back to each patch of the sky over and over, we have a chance to spot thousands of 'guest stars' on the celestial tapestry Simon Hodgkin This powerful event, now named Gaia14aaa, took place in a distant galaxy some 500 million light-years away, and was revealed via a sudden rise in the galaxy's brightness between two Gaia observations separated by one month.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
12.09.2014
Team Studies Nanocrystals by Passing Them Through Tiny Pores
Team Studies Nanocrystals by Passing Them Through Tiny Pores
An interdisciplinary team of University of Pennsylvania researchers has now applied a cutting-edge technique for rapid gene sequencing toward measuring other nanoscopic structures. By passing nanoscale spheres and rods through a tiny hole in a membrane, the team was able to measure the electrical properties of those structures' surfaces.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
12.09.2014
Research Helps Uncover Mechanism Behind Solid-Solid Phase Transitions
Research Helps Uncover Mechanism Behind Solid-Solid Phase Transitions
Two solids made of the same elements but with different geometric arrangements of the atoms, or crystal phases, can produce materials with different properties. Coal and diamond offer a spectacular example of this effect. While it is well known that one crystal phase can transform into another under the right circumstances, the mechanisms that facilitate solid-to-solid transitions are still not well understood.
Astronomy
12.09.2014
Astronomy
12.09.2014
Gaia discovers its first supernova
12 September 2014 While scanning the sky to measure the positions and movements of stars in our Galaxy, Gaia has discovered its first stellar explosion in another galaxy far, far away. This powerful event, now named Gaia14aaa, took place in a distant galaxy some 500 million light-years away, and was revealed via a sudden rise in the galaxy's brightness between two Gaia observations separated by one month.
Physics/Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
12.09.2014
Rediscovered ceramic has potential in hypersonic flight
Rediscovered ceramic has potential in hypersonic flight
A structural ceramic that can withstand temperatures three times hotter than lava shows promise in hypersonic air travel, say researchers. Researchers in the UK and around the world are currently working on prototype technologies that could enable new types of aircraft to travel at hypersonic speeds - five times faster than the speed of sound.
Medicine/Pharmacology
12.09.2014
Scientists to develop wearable movement sensors for MS patients
Scientists to develop wearable movement sensors for MS patients
A new study at Imperial will be developing sensor technology to assess gait in progressive multiple sclerosis patients in their home environments. If successful, this technology could boost efforts to evaluate new treatments, providing a new type of information for doctors and feedback to people with MS about their condition.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
12.09.2014
Hydrogen production breakthrough could herald cheap green energy
Scientists have taken a major step forward in the production of hydrogen from water which could lead to a new era of cheap, clean and renewable energy. Chemists from the University of Glasgow report in a new paper in Science today (Friday 12 September) on a new form of hydrogen production which is 30 times faster than the current state-of-the-art method.
Arts and Design
12.09.2014
3D printing creates a splash
The second Australian showcase of 3D printing will bring together the latest technology, ideas and experts under one roof.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
12.09.2014
Center for Advanced Cellular Therapeutics to Rise on Penn Medicine Campus
Center for Advanced Cellular Therapeutics to Rise on Penn Medicine Campus
The University of Pennsylvania today reached an important milestone in its alliance with Novartis as it unveiled plans for the construction of a first-of-its-kind Center for Advanced Cellular Therapeutics (CACT) on the Penn Medicine campus in Philadelphia.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
12.09.2014
New data confirm high efficacy of Gilenya
A key treatment goal for patients with MS is 'no evidence of disease activity' (NEDA), currently defined as no relapses, MRI lesions and disability progression Including MS-related brain shrinkage (brain volume loss) as a fourth key measure captures underlying damage that begins early in MS and is associated with loss of function The likelihood of achieving NEDA across four key measures was more than four-times greater in patients treat
Study of Religions
12.09.2014
Uncovering the text of the New Testament
A £1.1m campaign by Cambridge University Library to secure one of the most important New Testament manuscripts - the seventh-century Codex Zacynthius - has been a success.
Physics/Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
12.09.2014
Fluid mechanics suggests alternative to quantum orthodoxy
Fluid mechanics suggests alternative to quantum orthodoxy
The central mystery of quantum mechanics is that small chunks of matter sometimes seem to behave like particles, sometimes like waves.
Earth Sciences
12.09.2014
Wrinkles in time
Wrinkles in time
Take a walk along any sandy shoreline, and you're bound to see a rippled pattern along the seafloor, formed by the ebb and flow of the ocean's waves. Geologists have long observed similar impressions - in miniature - embedded within ancient rock. These tiny, millimeter-wide wrinkles have puzzled scientists for decades: They don't appear in any modern environment, but seem to be abundant much earlier in Earth's history, particularly following mass extinctions.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
11.09.2014
Ceramics Don't Have To Be Brittle
Ceramics Don’t Have To Be Brittle
Imagine a balloon that could float without using any lighter-than-air gas. Instead, it could simply have all of its air sucked out while maintaining its filled shape. Such a vacuum balloon, which could help ease the world's current shortage of helium, can only be made if a new material existed that was strong enough to sustain the pressure generated by forcing out all that air while still being lightweight and flexible.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
11.09.2014
Scientists reset human stem cells to earliest developmental state
Scientists have successfully 'reset' human pluripotent stem cells to the earliest developmental state - equivalent to cells found in an embryo before it implants in the womb (7-9 days old). These 'pristine' stem cells may mark the true starting point for human development, but have until now been impossible to replicate in the lab.
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
11.09.2014
New criminology team at The University of Nottingham
Professor Bill Dixon has expertise in policing, racially motivated offenders and crime, crime control and criminal justice in post-apartheid South Africa.
Environmental Sciences - Earth Sciences
11.09.2014
UW-built sensors to probe Antarctica's Southern Ocean
UW-built sensors to probe Antarctica’s Southern Ocean
University of Washington If historic explorer Ernest Shackleton were recruiting for the job, he might point out the bitter cold, long hours of complete darkness, danger and eventual "honor and recog
Social Sciences - History/Archeology
11.09.2014
Questions of race, state violence explored in 'The Rising Tide of Color'
Questions of race, state violence explored in ‘The Rising Tide of Color’
University of Washington Moon Ho Jung is an associate professor of history and editor of the book " The Rising Tide of Color: Race, State Violence and Radical Movements across the Pacific ,” published by University of Washington Press.
Social Sciences - Life Sciences
11.09.2014
Tipping the Balance of Behavior
Tipping the Balance of Behavior
Humans with autism often show a reduced frequency of social interactions and an increased tendency to engage in repetitive solitary behaviors. Autism has also been linked to dysfunction of the amygdala, a brain structure involved in processing emotions. Now Caltech researchers have discovered antagonistic neuron populations in the mouse amygdala that control whether the animal engages in social behaviors or asocial repetitive self-grooming.
Media Sciences/Political Sciences - Business/Economics
11.09.2014
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
11.09.2014
The quantum revolution is a step closer
Press release issued: 11 September 2014 A new way to run a quantum algorithm using much simpler methods than previously thought has been discovered by a team of researchers at the University of Bristol. These findings could dramatically bring forward the development of a 'quantum computer' capable of beating a conventional computer.
Careers/Employment - Social Sciences
11.09.2014
Some male scientists willing to forsake careers for family
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. One third of men in academic science are willing to scale back their careers to focus on family life, according to researchers. While traditional fatherhood roles may be shifting, men in the male-dominated field of academic science, such as physics and biology, face significant challenges in trying to balance work and family life, said Sarah Damaske , assistant professor of labor and employment relations and sociology , Penn State.
Life Sciences
11.09.2014
Research may have identified Jack the Ripper
Crucial DNA testing of a Victorian shawl, undertaken by a University of Leeds expert, may have helped solve the enduring riddle of the identity of Victorian serial killer Jack the Ripper. The killer, who preyed on prostitutes in London's East End in 1888, is widely believed to have at least five victims, but his identity has confounded professionals and amateur sleuths alike.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Computer Science/Telecom
11.09.2014
Soft robot survives fire and ice
When it comes to soft robots, researchers have finally managed to cut the cord.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
11.09.2014
Graphene paints a corrosion-free future
11 Sep 2014 A thin layer of graphene paint can make impermeable and chemically resistant coatings which could be used for packaging to keep food fresh for longer and protect metal structures against corrosion, new findings from The University of Manchester show.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Life Sciences
11.09.2014
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
11.09.2014
Researchers search for Venus-like planets
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Identification of planets orbiting distant stars is spurring the search for an Earth-like planet. Now a team of researchers has developed a way to distinguish a distant Venus-like planet from an Earth-like one. "We want to know how common Venus-like planets are," said Ravi Kumar Kopparapu , research associate in geosciences , Penn State.
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
11.09.2014
Physicists find a new way to push electrons around
When moving through a conductive material in an electric field, electrons tend to follow the path of least resistance - which runs in the direction of that field. But now physicists at MIT and the University of Manchester have found an unexpectedly different behavior under very specialized conditions - one that might lead to new types of transistors and electronic circuits that could prove highly energy-efficient.
Life Sciences
11.09.2014
Feature: Taking a shortcut to improving wheat
Feature: Taking a shortcut to improving wheat
In 2011 the world's farms produced a total of 681 million tonnes of wheat, but with an ever growing demand from a growing population, there is a real need for increasing yields yet further. At the University of Liverpool, one PhD student has developed software which will allow farmers to identify mutations in wheat, such as disease resistance and early flowering, that can be bred into crops and increase production.
Administration/Government - Business/Economics
11.09.2014
Making drones more customizable
Making drones more customizable
A first-ever standard "operating system" for drones, developed by a startup with MIT roots, could soon help manufacturers easily design and customize unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for multiple applications.
Business/Economics
11.09.2014
Gambling for good can increase low income saving by 25 per cent: new study
Gambling for good can increase low income saving by 25 per cent: new study 11 September 2014 Low income households could increase their savings by over 25 per cent if bank accounts with a regular lottery prize for depositors were introduced in Australia, University of Sydney economists have found.
Medicine/Pharmacology
11.09.2014
Binge drinking in pregnancy can affect child’s mental health and school results
Press release issued: 11 September 2014 Binge drinking during pregnancy can increase the risk of mental health problems - particularly hyperactivity and inattention - in children aged 11 and can have a negative effect on their school examination results, according to new research. This was the case even after a number of other lifestyle and social factors were taken into account, including the mother's own mental health, whether she smoked tobacco, used cannabis or other drugs during the pregnancy, her age, her education, and how many other children she had.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
11.09.2014
Recognition for an evolutionary master clockmaker: 2014 Eureka Prize for Early Career Researcher
Recognition for an evolutionary master clockmaker: 2014 Eureka Prize for Early Career Researcher 11 September 2014 Showing that the strain of fungus responsible for the Irish potato famine s
Medicine/Pharmacology - Environmental Sciences
11.09.2014
Los Alamos achieves 20-year low on radioactive air emissions
Los Alamos achieves 20-year low on radioactive air emissions
The Lab measures air emissions through a comprehensive system of 40 air monitoring stations located at the Laboratory and in neighboring communities.
History/Archeology - Environmental Sciences
11.09.2014
New exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife and climate of Los Alamos
New exhibit highlights the archaeology, wildlife and climate of Los Alamos
The Bradbury Science Museum unveils a new interactive exhibit "Environmental Research and Monitoring" on Sept.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
11.09.2014
'Hot Jupiters' provoke their own host suns to wobble
'Hot Jupiters' provoke their own host suns to wobble
"Hot Jupiters," those large, gaseous planets outside our solar system, can make their suns wobble after they wend their way through their own solar systems.
Physics/Materials Science - Arts and Design
11.09.2014
Art and nanotech converge in campus biennial
Art and nanotech converge in campus biennial
For her newest work, Korean artist Kimsooja wanted to explore a "shape and perspective that reveals the invisible as visible, physical as immaterial, and vice versa." As artist-in-residence for th
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
11.09.2014
Cornell cancer researchers listen to patients' stories
Cornell cancer researchers listen to patients' stories
It is common, often mandatory for students training to be clinicians to interact with patients. Yet it's quite unusual for researchers who develop biomedical treatments to ever communicate with those who are the target of their therapies.
Education/Continuing Education
11.09.2014
Depression drugs linked to failure of dental implants
A team from McGill University has discovered that people who take the most common antidepressants (such as Celexa, Paxil, Lexapro, Prozac, and Zoloft, the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors or SSRIs) are twice as likely to have dental implants fail as those who are not taking SSRIs.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.09.2014
More needed to protect our sportspeople from brain injury say Birmingham experts
Two University of Birmingham academics are calling for more research to be carried out looking at how the brains of sportspeople – including children – react when they receive a blow to the head.
Earth Sciences
10.09.2014
Seismic gap may be filled by an earthquake near Istanbul
Seismic gap may be filled by an earthquake near Istanbul
When a segment of a major fault line goes quiet, it can mean one of two things: The "seismic gap" may simply be inactive - the result of two tectonic plates placidly gliding past each other - or the
Astronomy
10.09.2014
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.09.2014
Manchester connected for World Suicide Prevention Day
10 Sep 2014 According to The World Health Organization every 40 seconds, somewhere in the world, a person dies from suicide.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.09.2014
Scientists map white matter connections within the human brain
Scientists map white matter connections within the human brain
Roughly 100 trillion connections between neurons make it possible for the brain to function. Psychology Professor Brian Wandell's group has devised a technique for mapping these connections with greater accuracy than ever before. To see, think or feel, the 100 billion neurons in our brain must exchange messages.
Physics/Materials Science - Business/Economics
10.09.2014
Europe’s new age of metals begins
10 September 2014 ESA has joined forces with other leading research institutions and more than 180 European companies in a billion-euro effort developing new types of metals and manufacturing techniques for this century.
Life Sciences - Agronomy/Food Science
10.09.2014
UCLA faculty voice: Rats ditch balanced diet to eat just like obese people
UCLA faculty voice: Rats ditch balanced diet to eat just like obese people
Buffets of highly processed foods like sugar and flour made rats ignore normal cues to stop eating when full Aaron Blaisdell Aaron Blaisdell is professor of psychology in the UCLA College and a member of UCLA's Brain Research Institute.
Medicine/Pharmacology
10.09.2014
Using antibiotics to help heart problems
Press release issued: 10 September 2014 A research team from the University of Bristol is looking at whether an antibiotic has the potential to prevent or treat irregular heartbeats brought on by other medicines, thanks to a grant from national charity Heart Research UK. Depending on the severity and type, cardiac arrhythmias – disturbances to the heart's normal electrical rhythm causing an irregular heartbeat - can lessen the quality or length of a person's life and in extreme cases can even cause sudden death.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Agronomy/Food Science
10.09.2014
Thyroid cancer rates in Pennsylvania rising faster than rest of country
HERSHEY, Pa. Incidence of thyroid cancer is rising faster in Pennsylvania than in the rest of the United States, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. "Since the mid-1970s, the incidence of thyroid cancer in the United States has more than tripled," said Dr. David Goldenberg , professor of surgery and medicine.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
10.09.2014
Advanced Light Source Sets Microscopy Record
Advanced Light Source Sets Microscopy Record
A record-setting X-ray microscopy experiment may have ushered in a new era for nanoscale imaging. Working at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), a collaboration of researchers used low energy or "soft" X-rays to image structures only five nanometers in size.
Administration/Government - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.09.2014
Another record year for University of Cambridge spin-out investments
The University invested £2.7 million last year to support the development of Cambridge spin-outs.
Social Sciences
10.09.2014
Are local or international peacebuilding initiatives more effective?
10 Sep 2014 An internationally renowned group of experts are to explain why local peacebuilding initiatives are the most effective way of reconnecting the state to its people.
10.09.2014
The Scottish Independence Referendum
10 Sep 2014 Scots prepare to vote for the future of their country on 18 September, when they will answer the question: 'should Scotland be an independent country', the exact wording of the question which will be posed to them.
Astronomy - Social Sciences
10.09.2014
ESA’s bug-eyed telescope to spot risky asteroids
10 September 2014 Spotting Earth-threatening asteroids is tough partly because the sky is so big. But insects offer an answer, since they figured out long ago how to look in many directions at once. As part of the global effort to hunt out risky celestial objects such as asteroids and comets, ESA is developing an automated telescope for nightly sky surveys.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.09.2014
Gilenya data confirm reducing brain shrinkage matters
Brain shrinkage is associated with a loss of physical and cognitive function and occurs at a faster rate in people with MS than those without the disease New data showed patients who had the highest rates of brain shrinkage (brain volume loss) at two years had a higher risk of disability progression at four years Separate analyses showed that patients continuously treated with Gilenya for six years had sustained low rates of brain shri
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
10.09.2014
Working with Business: Redx Oncology
Housed in a wing of the University's Duncan Building is a treasure trove for cancer researchers - the Liverpool Tissue Bank (LTB).
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
10.09.2014
Long acting HIV drugs to be developed
HIV drugs which only need to be taken once a month are to be developed at the University of Liverpool in a bid to overcome the problem of 'pill fatigue'.
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
10.09.2014
Scottish referendum: what the experts say
Scottish referendum: what the experts say
With a week to go until Scotland takes to the polls, experts at the University of Sheffield share their views on different aspects of the independence debate.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
10.09.2014
Centre launches to improve wound treatment
A new centre devoted to tackling the "silent epidemic" of wound care will launch today. Wound care currently costs the NHS across the UK at least £4billion annually, accounting for around 5% of the NHS's overall budget and rising.
Business/Economics - Social Sciences
10.09.2014
U of M researcher, partners expose market structure behind juvenile sex trafficking in Minneapolis
Findings reveal violent, sophisticated system of buyers, facilitators and recruitment tactics Exploitation, violence and brutality play key operational roles in the juvenile sex trafficking business models in Minneapolis, according to a new study released today by Lauren Martin, director of research for the University of Minnesota Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center (UROC), and Alexandra Pierce, president of Othayonih Research.
Social Sciences
10.09.2014
Fitting image: athletes pick their favourite pic
Fitting image: athletes pick their favourite pic 10 September 2014 A University of Sydney study has revealed a gender bias in how top-level athletes are photographed. Dr Kate Russell, from the University of Sydney's Faculty of Education and Social Work, asked top level athletes to consider how they want to be represented in a photograph as 'an elite athlete' to a younger audience of boys and girls between the ages of nine and 14.
Earth Sciences - Environmental Sciences
10.09.2014
RSMAS Part of $21 Million Research Program
MIAMI - Researchers for the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science are part of a $21 million collaborative research program led by Princeton University to create a biogeochemical and physical portrait of the Southern Ocean using hundreds of robotic floats deployed around Antarctica and an expanded computational capacity.
Careers/Employment - Business/Economics
10.09.2014
Companies tighten reins on noncompete agreements
Greta Guest, (734) 936-7821, gguest [a] umich (p) edu or Terry Kosdrosky, (734) 936-2502, terrykos [a] umich (p) edu ANN ARBOR-The use of noncompete agreements in employment contracts from t
Environmental Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.09.2014
State of the Birds report shows success and need for conservation
The main threats to birds are habitat loss, cats, collisions, and pollution, but the good news is people know how to reduce them.
Mathematics - Environmental Sciences
10.09.2014
Bartels Fellow Hans Rosling finds hope in numbers
Bartels Fellow Hans Rosling finds hope in numbers
A statistician with an eye for spotting pioneering trends, Hans Rosling, a Swedish medical doctor and academic, dispels myths about the developing world.
Astronomy - Computer Science/Telecom
09.09.2014
Where to grab space debris
Where to grab space debris
Objects in space tend to spin - and spin in a way that's totally different from the way they spin on earth.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
09.09.2014
Buckyballs and diamondoids join forces in tiny electronic gadget from Stanford and SLAC
Buckyballs and diamondoids join forces in tiny electronic gadget from Stanford and SLAC
Scientists craft two exotic forms of carbon into a molecule for steering electron flow. Scientists have married two unconventional forms of carbon – one shaped like a soccer ball, the other a tiny diamond – to make a molecule that conducts electricity in only one direction. This tiny electronic component, known as a rectifier, could play a key role in shrinking chip components down to the size of molecules to enable faster, more powerful devices.
Careers/Employment - Medicine/Pharmacology
09.09.2014
Stanford and SEIU reach agreement; SEIU votes overwhelmingly to approve contract
Stanford University and the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 2007 have reached an agreement on a new five-year contract for the more than 1,200 union members who work on campus and at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The union employees voted overwhelmingly in favor of approving the new contract last Thursday, Sept.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering
09.09.2014
Engineer aims to connect the world with ant-sized radios
Costing just pennies to make, tiny radios-on-a-chip are designed to serve as controllers or sensors for the 'Internet of Things.' A Stanford engineering team has built a radio the size of an ant, a
Astronomy
09.09.2014
Business/Economics
09.09.2014
Life Sciences
09.09.2014
Hazardous waste-eating bacteria
09 Sep 2014 Tiny single-cell organisms discovered living underground could help with the problem of nuclear waste disposal, say researchers involved in a study at The University of Manchester. Although bacteria with waste-eating properties have been discovered in relatively pristine soils before, this is the first time that microbes that can survive in the very harsh conditions expected in radioactive waste disposal sites have been found.
Arts and Design - Careers/Employment
09.09.2014
Artists celebrate a world of carnival, fantasy and make-believe
Six prominent artists whose colourful creations were inspired by the enchanting National Fairground Archive will showcase their work at a new exhibition which opens its doors to the public this week (10 September 2014).
Law/Forensics
09.09.2014
Documents that Changed the World: The Star Spangled Banner turns 200
Documents that Changed the World: The Star Spangled Banner turns 200
University of Washington From Francis Scott Key's pen in 1814 through war, peace and even Jimi Hendrix's screeching electric guitar at Woodstock, the Star Spangled Banner has lasted as an American icon - and an anthem that's nearly impossible to sing.
Environmental Sciences
09.09.2014
Southern Ocean's role in climate regulation, ocean health is goal of $21 million federal grant
Southern Ocean's role in climate regulation, ocean health is goal of $21 million federal grant
Southern Ocean's role in climate regulation, ocean health is goal of $21 million federal grant Posted September 9, 2014; 11:30 a.m. by Morgan Kelly, Office of The Southern Ocean that encircles Antarctica lends a considerable hand in keeping Earth's temperature hospitable by soaking up half of the human-made carbon in the atmosphere and a majority of the planet's excess heat.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
09.09.2014
How age alters our immune response to bereavement
Young people have a more robust immune response to the loss of a loved one, according to new research from the University of Birmingham, providing insight into how different generations cope with loss.
Environmental Sciences
09.09.2014
Visit the planet's wildlife on your doorstep at Imperial's Silwood Park
Visit the planet’s wildlife on your doorstep at Imperial’s Silwood Park
Fancy a day out hunting for bugs, foraging for fungi or finding out how to help conservationists monitor wildlife in your garden?
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
09.09.2014
NHMRC grants to improve the health of the world
NHMRC grants to improve the health of the world 9 September 2014 The University of Sydney has been awarded more than $6.7 million in funding in the latest round of grants from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). University researchers received 10 Research Fellowships and one Practitioner Fellowship.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
09.09.2014
Chief Medical Officer's Annual Report focuses on mental health
Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Professor Graham Thornicroft and Dr Max Henderson of the IoPPN at King's today launched the Chief Medical Officer's (CMO) Annual Report - Public Mental Health Priorities:
Environmental Sciences - Life Sciences
09.09.2014
Biologists try to dig endangered pupfish out of its hole
Biologists try to dig endangered pupfish out of its hole
Devils Hole pupfish in the Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility in Nevada's Amargosa Valley. These individuals hatched from eggs removed from Devils Hole in November 2013.
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
09.09.2014
Computer Science/Telecom
09.09.2014
Google-funded research will scan clothing and behavior
Two faculty members have received awards from Research at Google, the Internet giant's R&D division, to support computer science projects.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
09.09.2014
Optogenetics shed light on cardiac, lung, immune disease
Optogenetics shed light on cardiac, lung, immune disease
New technologies involving optogenetic proteins, which use light to control and observe cells with unprecedented precision, have begun to illuminate processes underlying cellular behavior and the effects of celland gene-based therapies. Cornell researchers are developing advanced forms of these proteins to create a toolkit to make them more widely available to scientists.
Psychology
09.09.2014
Experiment makes energy savings a game
Let's face it: We're energy hogs. We want more light, we flip a switch. If we're hot, we crank up the AC, without a second thought on the power grid strain.
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
08.09.2014
Paradigm shifter
Paradigm shifter
Maxime Cohen, a graduate student at the MIT Operations Research Center, could be doing just about anything now.
Social Sciences - Sport Sciences
08.09.2014
NFL needs consciousness-raising campaign on domestic abuse, say Stanford experts
NFL needs consciousness-raising campaign on domestic abuse, say Stanford experts
Stanford professors say the NFL should finally address the problem of players committing violence against women.
Civil Engineering/Traffic Engineering - Event
08.09.2014
Q&A: Allison Carruth, your navigator on the L.A. River
A Colorado native, Allison Carruth grew up enjoying free-flowing alpine rivers fed by snow melt. So the UCLA associate professor of English is not an obvious advocate for the largely channelized Los Angeles River that is fed by urban run-off, treated wastewater and other less pristine sources.
Life Sciences - Business/Economics
08.09.2014
Study links honesty to prefrontal region of the brain
Study links honesty to prefrontal region of the brain
Are humans programmed to tell the truth? Not when lying is advantageous, says a new study led by Assistant Professor Ming Hsu at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business.
Earth Sciences
08.09.2014
Textbook Theory Behind Volcanoes May Be Wrong
Textbook Theory Behind Volcanoes May Be Wrong
In the typical textbook picture, volcanoes, such as those that are forming the Hawaiian islands, erupt when magma gushes out as narrow jets from deep inside Earth. But that picture is wrong, according to a new study from researchers at Caltech and the University of Miami in Florida. New seismology data are now confirming that such narrow jets don't actually exist, says Don Anderson, the Eleanor and John R. McMillian Professor of Geophysics, Emeritus, at Caltech.
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
08.09.2014
New motor under development by UW-Madison spinoff
A prototype electric motor that uses a new principle for transforming electricity into rotary force is being developed at C-Motive Technologies, a company co-founded by UW-Madison assistant professor Dan Ludois.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
08.09.2014
In one of nature's innovations, a single cell smashes and rebuilds its own genome
In one of nature's innovations, a single cell smashes and rebuilds its own genome
In one of nature's innovations, a single cell smashes and rebuilds its own genome Posted September 8, 2014; 01:45 p.m. by Morgan Kelly, Office of Life can be so intricate and novel that even a single cell can pack a few surprises, according to a study led by Princeton University researchers.
Administration/Government - Law/Forensics
08.09.2014
National Trustworthy Software Initiative to be based at WMG’s Cyber Security Centre
WMG's Cyber Security Centre at the University of Warwick is to host a million pound programme designed to enhance the cyber security of many of our everyday technologies and tools by ensuring that the software that underpins them is more trustworthy.