science wire

404 - page not found


# "Science Wire" gives access to latest science news from research centers and R&D companies.
Category


Last News

Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
01.02.2015
Feature: What's the point of Dry January?
Feature: What’s the point of Dry January?
Professor Matt Field is Professor of Experimental Addiction Research at the University's Institute of Psychology, Health and Society :   "Sunday, 1 February marks the end of a self-imposed
Astronomy - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
30.01.2015
The search continues
Despite earlier reports of a possible detection, a joint analysis of data from ESA's Planck satellite and the ground-based BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments has found no conclusive evidence of primordial gravitational waves. The Universe began about 13.8 billion years ago and evolved from an extremely hot, dense and uniform state to the rich and complex cosmos of galaxies, stars and planets we see today.
Astronomy
30.01.2015
Gravitational Waves from Early Universe Remain Elusive
Gravitational Waves from Early Universe Remain Elusive
A joint analysis of data from the Planck space mission and the ground-based experiment BICEP2 has found no conclusive evidence of gravitational waves from the birth of our universe, despite earlier reports of a possible detection.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
30.01.2015
New class of antibodies raises hope of dengue fever vaccine
New class of antibodies raises hope of dengue fever vaccine
Scientists have discovered a new class of human antibodies against the dengue fever virus, which could be exploited to develop a vaccine. Dengue fever cases have risen dramatically in recent decades as the disease has spread to new areas. An estimated 390 million infections occur each year, with around 40 per cent of the world's population living in areas at risk.
Arts and Design
30.01.2015
Game On
"Why is my heart broken?" asked Dani Belko, a producer at Schell Games, as she played a videogame called "A Plug's Life" on a large screen in Carnegie Mellon University's Hunt Library.
Chemistry - Medicine/Pharmacology
30.01.2015
Carl Djerassi, Stanford professor and world-renowned chemist, dead at 91
Carl Djerassi, Stanford professor and world-renowned chemist, dead at 91
In his long career, Stanford chemist Carl Djerassi excelled in science and the arts. He may be remembered most as the father of the birth control pill.
Business/Economics
30.01.2015
UK and US higher education boosts inward investment
Universities in UK and US are driving Indian firms' expansion across the globe, new research claims.
Medicine/Pharmacology
30.01.2015
UCLA cardiologists offer heart-healthy tips
With the arrival of American Heart Month in February, it's that time of the year to remind ourselves to take good care of our hearts.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
30.01.2015
UCLA is only West Coast medical center to offer pioneering surgery for phrenic nerve damage
David Powell could not catch his breath. The 35-year-old from San Diego got winded walking up the stairs, exercising or even just bending over to tie his shoes.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
30.01.2015
Face blindness predicted by structural differences in the brain, Stanford neuroscientists discover
Face blindness predicted by structural differences in the brain, Stanford neuroscientists discover
Differences in connectivity in the brain predict face blindness in adults, say Stanford neuroscientists. They plan to observe these surprising differences in children to discover how this visual deficit develops. Recognizing the faces of family and friends seems vital to social interaction. However, some individuals lack this essential skill.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
30.01.2015
Carnegie Mellon, Pitt Ethicists Question Impact of Hospital Advertising
By Shilo Rea / 412-268-6094 If you have ever "googled" illness symptoms and possible treatments, you are not alone. A national Pew Research Center survey indicated that 72 percent of adults searched the Internet for health information in the past year. But, how reliable is that information and what are the ethical implications? In a commentary piece published in JAMA Internal Medicine , Carnegie Mellon University's Alex John London and the University of Pittsburgh's Yael Schenker question the impact of health information that is available online, specifically hospital advertisements.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
30.01.2015
New technique could lead to cheaper, more efficient solar power and LEDs
U of'T experts are shining new light on an emerging family of solar-absorbing materials that could lead to cheaper and more efficient solar panels and LEDs.
Computer Science/Telecom
30.01.2015
Incentives encourage greater exploration, research finds
Poet Robert Frost urged us to explore "the road not taken." But what if you're not driving the bus? How do you encourage others to explore less-traveled roads? Cornell researchers have found an answer in an area of computer science you don't usually hear about: playing imaginary slot machines. There are applications in the academic world, from research funding to crowdsourcing, but also in everyday life.
Life Sciences - Environmental Sciences
30.01.2015
Learning lessons by following Madison’s foxes and coyotes
A young adult fox is pictured before being released from a cable snare trap on campus near the Lakeshore Nature Preserve as part of a research effort to study the behavior of growing fox and coyote p
Social Sciences
30.01.2015
Consumer sentiment highest in decade in January
ANN ARBOR-Consumer optimism rose in the January 2015 survey to its highest level in the past decade, according to the University of Michigan Surveys of Consumers.
Life Sciences
30.01.2015
NSF-funded study analyzes how manmade noise impacts bird decline
Derrick Taff, researcher and assistant professor, works with a mountaineer during a soundscape study at Denali National Park and Preserve.
Environmental Sciences - Astronomy
30.01.2015
Corsican waters
ESA Space in Images Title Corsica Released 30/01/2015 2:57 pm Copyright USGS/ESA Description The Mediterranean Sea's most mountainous island, Corsica, dominates this image from the Landsat-8 satellite.
Architecture - Environmental Sciences
30.01.2015
Straw Houses in the Front Line of Sustainable Construction
Straw Houses in the Front Line of Sustainable Construction
For the first time ever, an EPFL laboratory has carried out a complete energy analysis of a straw house, from planting the grass to the destruction of the materials.
Agronomy/Food Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
30.01.2015
A third of children in England are overweight/obese
A third of children in England are overweight/obese, finds a 20-year King's College London study of electronic health records, published online in Archives of Disease in Childhood . But the rapid rise in prevalence may be starting to level off—at least in younger children—the findings indicate, although there are no grounds for complacency, warn the researchers.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
30.01.2015
Using a single molecule to create a new magnetic field sensor
Using a single molecule to create a new magnetic field sensor
Researchers at the University of Liverpool and University College London (UCL) have shown a new way to use a single molecule as a magnetic field sensor.
Astronomy - Administration/Government
30.01.2015
Mount Stromlo ruin rises from the ashes »
ANU Heritage Officer Amy Jarvis and Director of the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics Professor Matthew Colless inspect the Director's Residence at Mount Stromlo.
Literature/Linguistics - Arts and Design
30.01.2015
Decoding the meaning of language
How is it possible that simple acoustic vibrations, hand gestures, and even ink patterns can give one person access to the thoughts of someone else? This is the central question of linguistics, and one that has fascinated Kai von Fintel throughout his career.
Computer Science/Telecom - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
30.01.2015
Parallelizing common algorithms
Every undergraduate computer-science major takes a course on data structures, which describes different ways of organizing data in a computer's memory.
Life Sciences - Environmental Sciences
29.01.2015
Our seas are in trouble
Conservation attention is focusing on land living animals and plants Increasing evidence that our seas are in trouble As many as one in every four sea species may be at risk of extinction
History/Archeology - Arts and Design
29.01.2015
In search of Vikings - University experts in arts and sciences publish new book
A new book containing some of the latest fascinating research into the Viking Age has been published by experts from The University of Nottingham, Oxford University and the Chester Grosvenor Museum. ‘ In Search of Vikings: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Scandinavian Heritage of North-West England ' is a unique collection of new discoveries from the arts and sciences about the presence and influence of these famous Scandinavian invaders in a region considered as a Viking ‘hot spot'.
Social Sciences
29.01.2015
Individuals May Fail To Navigate Complex Tradeoffs in Privacy Decision-Making
Carnegie Mellon Team Finds Individuals May Fail To Navigate Complex Tradeoffs in Privacy Decision-Making-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University Researchers Call for Policies That Seek
Business/Economics
29.01.2015
Poster session highlights latest evolution in GE-funded natural gas initiative
Charles H. Whiteman, John and Becky Surma Dean of the Penn State Smeal College of Business, listens as Zhenhui (Jessie) Li, an assistant professor in the College of Information Sciences and Technology, explains her research during the CCRINGSS poster presentation.
Astronomy
29.01.2015
Magnificent merger
ESA uses cookies to track visits to our website only, no personal information is collected. By continuing to use the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.
29.01.2015
IXV packed and ready
IXV during fairing encapsulation The IXV Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle, installed on its payload adapter, is being prepared for launch, at Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, on 28 January 2015.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
29.01.2015
Stanford launches major effort to expedite vaccine discovery with $50 million grant
Stanford launches major effort to expedite vaccine discovery with $50 million grant
Stanford University today announced that it has received a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to accelerate efforts in vaccine development. The $50 million grant over 10 years will build on existing technology developed at Stanford and housed in the Human Immune Monitoring Core, and will establish the Stanford Human Systems Immunology Center.
Mathematics
29.01.2015
Learn math without fear, Stanford expert says
Stanford Professor Jo Boaler says that students most effectively learn "math facts" working on problems that they enjoy, rather than through exercises and drills they fear.
Business/Economics - Arts and Design
29.01.2015
Privacy challenges
Privacy challenges
In this week's issue of the journal Science , MIT researchers report that just four fairly vague pieces of information - the dates and locations of four purchases - are enough to identify 90 percent
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
29.01.2015
New project looks to end lupus ’trial and error’
The University of Leeds is to be a key partner in a new £5.1 m project aimed at eliminating the 'trial and error' approach to the treatment of lupus.
Physics/Materials Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
29.01.2015
Los Alamos develops new technique for growing high-efficiency perovskite solar cells
Los Alamos develops new technique for growing high-efficiency perovskite solar cells
Science & Innovation Home » Science & Engineering Capabilities Research Library Publications Science Briefs Science Programs Science Pillars Science Organizations Science Features Collaboration Home » Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation Fellows Postdocs, Students Conferences User Facilities Pathogen
Environmental Sciences - Earth Sciences
29.01.2015
Global warming research: strong storms to become stronger, weak storms to become weaker
A study led by atmospheric physicists at the University of Toronto finds that global warming will not lead to an overall increasingly stormy atmosphere, a topic debated by scientists for decades. Instead, strong storms will become stronger while weak storms become weaker, and the cumulative result of the number of storms will remain unchanged.
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
29.01.2015
Qubits with staying power
Qubits with staying power
Quantum computers are experimental devices that promise exponential speedups on some computational problems.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
29.01.2015
Getting a Better Grip on HIV
Getting a Better Grip on HIV
Capitalizing on a new insight into HIV's strategy for evading antibodies-proteins produced by the immune system to identify and wipe out invading objects such as viruses-Caltech researchers have developed antibody-based molecules that are more than 100 times better than our bodies' own defenses at binding to and neutralizing HIV, when tested in vitro.
Administration/Government - Medicine/Pharmacology
29.01.2015
Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation near the top of the patent charts for 2013
The WARF building (right) towers over the west campus in this view from 2011. Established in 1925, WARF is one of the world's oldest university intellectual property organizations. Photo: Bryce Richter In 2013, with 160 patents, the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) was near the pinnacle of the university patent heap.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
29.01.2015
Decoding sugar addiction
Together, obesity and Type 2 diabetes rank among our nation's greatest health problem, and they largely result from what many call an "addiction" to sugar. But solving this problem is more complicated than solving drug addiction, because it requires reducing the drive to eat unhealthy foods without affecting the desire to eat healthy foods when hungry.
Environmental Sciences - Psychology
29.01.2015
Public perception of man-made climate change is at a 10-year high
The British public's belief in the reality of climate change and its humancauses rose last year following the winter floods, and is now at its highest since 2005, according to a new study.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
29.01.2015
£5M to improve treatment of lupus
£5M to improve treatment of lupus
The University of Liverpool is part of a new £5.1 million consortium, working to eliminate the 'trial and error' approach to the treatment of lupus.  The new project, launched by George Freeman MP
Medicine/Pharmacology
29.01.2015
Cancer fear can impact screening uptake
Cancer fear can impact screening uptake
People who worry about cancer are more likely to want to get screened for colon cancer, but feeling uncomfortable at the thought of cancer makes them less likely to actually go for the test, finds new UCL-led research. The study, published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention , looked at how different types of fear influenced colorectal cancer screening decisions in nearly eight thousand UK adults.
Environmental Sciences - Life Sciences
29.01.2015
Invasive Species in the Great Lakes by 2063
The Great Lakes have been invaded by more non-native species than any other freshwater ecosystem in the world.
Business/Economics - Social Sciences
29.01.2015
Many join 1 percent, but few stay for long
Here's some good news for the New Year: According to new research by Tom Hirschl, professor of development sociology at Cornell University, and Mark Rank of Washington University in St. Louis,
Literature/Linguistics
29.01.2015
U-M partners to make 25,000 early English books open to the public
U-M partners to make 25,000 early English books open to the public
ANN ARBOR-The texts of the first printed editions of Shakespeare, Chaucer and Milton as well as lesser-known titles from the early modern era can now be freely read by anyone with an Internet connection.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
29.01.2015
New £12 million Synthetic Biology Centre to help drive advances in biotechnology, medicine and food security
Researchers at the University of Warwick have won a £12 Million award to create a new Centre to develop advanced technologies in synthetic biology.
Life Sciences - Administration/Government
29.01.2015
Minister in Manchester to announce £40 million funding boost
The Business Secretary Vince Cable will visit The University of Manchester's Institute of Biotechnology today after announcing £40 million of funding for cutting edge research.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
29.01.2015
Manchester to lead project for better lupus treatment
The University of Manchester is to lead a new £5.1 million consortium of universities and industry partners in a project aimed at eliminating the 'trial and error' approach to the treatment of lupus.
Environmental Sciences - Administration/Government
29.01.2015
Skorton releases Accelerated Working Group report
President David Skorton issued the following statement Jan.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
29.01.2015
Friedmann Recognized for Pioneering Gene Therapy Research
Theodore Friedmann, MD, professor in the Department of Pediatrics at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine was named today one of three recipients of the 2015 Japan Prize, a prestigi
Environmental Sciences - Earth Sciences
29.01.2015
Biscuits help resolve climate change controversy
New analysis of seafloor sediments has provided scientists with direct evidence of dramatic natural changes in oceanic, atmospheric, climatic and ecological conditions, resolving long-standing controversy around climate change. Around 56 million years ago a large amount of carbon dioxide was added, by natural means, to the atmosphere.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
29.01.2015
Rotavirus vaccine reduces severe diarrhoea by 64% in Malawi
Rotavirus vaccine reduces severe diarrhoea by 64% in Malawi
Research at the University of Liverpool has found that diarrhoea caused by rotavirus infection is significantly reduced in the developing world with the use of a vaccine to prevent the condition.
Event - Physics/Materials Science
29.01.2015
On the hunt
It's early afternoon on Friday, Jan. 16. On the third floor of MIT's Building 34, three classrooms are buzzing with excitement.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering
29.01.2015
Environmental Sciences - Administration/Government
29.01.2015
Climate Action Plan Acceleration Working Group report released
President David Skorton issued the following statement Jan.
Medicine/Pharmacology
28.01.2015
Novartis announces study in NEJM showing Jakavi was superior to standard therapy in rare blood cancer polycythemia vera
Jakavi (ruxolitinib) treatment resulted in durable hematocrit control, spleen size reduction and symptom relief for patients with uncontrolled polycythemia vera Polycythemia vera (PV)
Earth Sciences - Astronomy
28.01.2015
Cubes with a view
ESA Space in Images Title Picasso CubeSat Released 28/01/2015 9:24 am Copyright BISA Description The PICosatellite for Atmospheric and Space Science Observations (Picasso) CubeSat, designed to investigate the upper layers of Earth's atmosphere.
Social Sciences - Arts and Design
28.01.2015
Child maltreatment not a clear path to adult crime
Research has found a significant link between childhood abuse and neglect and crime in adulthood. But a recent University of Washington study finds that link all but disappears when accounting for other life factors. "We find that children who were involved in child welfare services are at high risk of adult crimes, but once we accounted for childhood socioeconomic status and later marital status and education, many of those effects went away,” co-author Todd Herrenkohl said.
Medicine/Pharmacology
28.01.2015
HRH The Prince of Wales opens the Surgical Innovation Centre
HRH The Prince of Wales opens the Surgical Innovation Centre
A global centre for excellence in innovation and design in healthcare delivery was formally opened today by His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales.
Sport Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
28.01.2015
Deflategate: Could Physics Be at Fault?
By Jocelyn Duffy / 412-268-9982 By now, most people in America have heard about "Deflategate," where the New England Patriots are alleged to have used underinflated footballs during the AFC championship game against the Indianapolis Colts.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
28.01.2015
Possible Therapeutic Target for Common, But Mysterious Brain Blood Vessel Disorder
Possible Therapeutic Target for Common, But Mysterious Brain Blood Vessel Disorder
Tens of millions of people around the world have abnormal, leak-prone sproutings of blood vessels in the brain called cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormal growths can lead to seizures, strokes, hemorrhages, and other serious conditions, yet their precise molecular cause has never been determined.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
28.01.2015
Penn-led Study: Children With Respiratory Failure Can Be Awake Yet Comfortable in ICU
Penn-led Study: Children With Respiratory Failure Can Be Awake Yet Comfortable in ICU
For small children, being hospitalized is an especially frightening experience above and beyond the challenges of whatever they are being treated for. They are often connected to a variety of unpleasant tubes and monitors, which they may instinctively try to remove. Standard practice in hospitals is to fully sedate such children for their comfort and safety, but a new study, led by Martha Curley , the Ellen and Robert Kapito Professor in Nursing Science at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing , shows that lighter, more finely-tuned sedation can be just as effective.
Chemistry - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
28.01.2015
Spiky ’hedgehog particles’ for safer paints, fewer VOC emissions
ANN ARBOR-A new process that can sprout microscopic spikes on nearly any type of particle may lead to more environmentally friendly paints and a variety of other innovations.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
28.01.2015
Manchester United’s rising stars revolutionize heart health
A unique research project to identify the effects of exercise on young hearts has been announced today [Wednesday 28 January 2015]. Manchester United's Academy players are being put through their paces having their hearts monitored by the newest imaging technology to give invaluable insights into how young people's hearts work while doing exercise.
Literature/Linguistics - Event
28.01.2015
What would you ask Tony Award-winning choreographer Bill T. Jones?
What would you ask Tony Award-winning choreographer Bill T. Jones?
Jones and his dance company perform on campus and the choreographer carves out time to engage with students in writing before his visit and in person once he arrives.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
28.01.2015
Study identifies biological mechanisms for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression
Genes relating to immune function and histone methylation - molecular changes that alter DNA expression - are risk factors Mark Wheeler Common psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression share genetic risk factors related to immune function and DNA regulation, according to new findings by a large collaborative research project from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium involving UCLA, King's College London, Cardiff University, Harvard and MIT.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Mathematics
28.01.2015
Reengineering privacy, post-Snowden
Privacy isn't what it used to be. Post-Sony, post-Snowden, we know our digital world is insecure, yet most of us continue to share a vast amount of personal information over networks.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
28.01.2015
In Illinois, muskrats and minks harbor toxoplasmosis, a cat disease
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. A new study of muskrats and minks in central Illinois indicates that toxoplasmosis, a disease spread by cats, is moving rapidly through the landscape and contaminating local waterways. Researchers found antibodies for Toxoplasma gondii , the parasite that causes toxoplasmosis, in 18 of 30 muskrats and 20 of 26 minks tested for the disease in central Illinois.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
28.01.2015
Some potentially habitable planets began as gaseous, Neptune-like worlds
Some potentially habitable planets began as gaseous, Neptune-like worlds
Two phenomena known to inhibit the potential habitability of planets - tidal forces and vigorous stellar activity - might instead help chances for life on certain planets orbiting low-mass stars, University of Washington astronomers have found.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Physics/Materials Science
28.01.2015
New project aims to take the brakes off wireless broadband data transfer
A new European Commission-funded project is setting out to develop a novel form of ultra-fast wireless data transfer.
Administration/Government - Business/Economics
28.01.2015
Vince Cable announces that Warwick will be 1 of the 5 universities to lead the Alan Turing Institute
The University of Warwick is one five universities announced today, Wednesday 28 th January, by the Rt.
Mathematics - Computer Science/Telecom
28.01.2015
Cambridge announced as one of five key partners in new national Alan Turing Institute
The University of Cambridge is to be one of the five universities that will lead the new Alan Turing Institute, announced the Rt Hon Dr Vince Cable, Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills today.
Social Sciences - Environmental Sciences
28.01.2015
U-M survey reveals how personal concerns, income shape consumer attitudes about energy
ANN ARBOR-Americans are just as concerned about energy's impact on the environment as they are about its affordability, according to first-year results of the University of Michigan Energy Survey.
Business/Economics
28.01.2015
Crude conspiracy theories could be right
Researchers have for the first time provided strong evidence for what conspiracy theorists have long thought – oil is often the reason for interfering in another country's war. Throughout recent history, countries which need oil have found reasons to interfere in countries with a good supply of it and, the researchers argue, this could help explain the US interest in ISIS in northern Iraq.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Life Sciences
28.01.2015
Electronic circuits with reconfigurable pathways closer to reality
Electronic circuits with reconfigurable pathways closer to reality
Multitasking circuits capable of reconfiguring themselves in real time and switching functions as the need arises - this is the promising application stemming from a discovery made at EPFL and published. Other potential uses: miniaturising our electronic devices and developing resilient circuits. Will it be possible one day to reconfigure electronic microchips however we want, even when they are in use? A recent discovery by a team at EPFL suggests as much.
Medicine/Pharmacology
28.01.2015
Research in the news: Anxiety associated with greater cognitive decline in those at risk for Alzheimer’s
Older persons at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease because of accumulated amyloid-beta plaques experience more rapid cognitive decline if they also have elevated anxiety symptoms, according to new research published online Jan.
Earth Sciences - Environmental Sciences
28.01.2015
Fossils' surroundings shed light on extinction and environmental changes
Penn State paleobiologist Mark Patzkowsky at a favorite study site, the Upper Missouri Breaks National Monument in Montana.  Paleobiologist Mark Patzkowsky remembers when the insight that would set the direction of his career snapped into focus.
Life Sciences
28.01.2015
The winners and losers of ocean acidification
The population balance of some marine 'pests' could be drastically changed as the world's oceans become increasingly acidic.
Astronomy - Event
28.01.2015
Does time pass?
Does time pass?
"If you walk into a cocktail party and say, 'I don't believe that time passes,' everyone's going to think you're completely insane," says Brad Skow, an associate professor of philosophy at MIT.
Mathematics - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
27.01.2015
Study identifies common elements of STEM schools
Science, technology, engineering and mathematics schools vary in many ways, but they share eight major common elements.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
27.01.2015
Faculty members receive named, distinguished service professorships
Five UChicago faculty members— Leora Auslander , Daniel Diermeier , Yang-Xin Fu , Lucia Rothman-Denes and Benoît Roux —have received named professorships, while two UChicago faculty members— A
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Chemistry
27.01.2015
Generators that relieve power grid worsen ozone pollution
Generators that relieve power grid worsen ozone pollution
Cornell engineers have found that firing up diesel backup generators in non-emergency situations triggers rising atmospheric ozone concentrations due to additional nitrogen oxide emissions.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.01.2015
Scientist wins international award for discoveries leading to new class of cancer drugs
Scientist wins international award for discoveries leading to new class of cancer drugs
A Spanish foundation has awarded a major scientific prize to Yale researcher Joseph Schlessinger and two colleagues in recognition of their work leading to the first personalized treatments for cancer. The 2015 Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Biomedicine from the Madrid-based BBVA Foundation includes a ¤400,000 cash prize.
Earth Sciences - Environmental Sciences
27.01.2015
UW researchers helping region get ready for the next Big One
UW researchers helping region get ready for the next Big One
More than three hundred years ago this week, the geologic fault off Washington and Oregon's coast lurched and caused a massive earthquake.
Environmental Sciences
27.01.2015
Penn State doctoral candidate creates virtual tour of Ricketts Glen State Park
Matt McKinney used a specialized set up with a Glidecam that allowed him to capture ultra-smooth hiking video along the trails at Ricketts Glen State Park.
Computer Science/Telecom - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
27.01.2015
History/Archeology
27.01.2015
Comment: In praise of TV history
Dr Catherine Fletcher, a Lecturer in Public History at the University of Sheffield, comments on how the best television series convey the sweep and thrill of history and make us anew about the past.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
27.01.2015
Research Table
Research Table
The University of Liverpool has been ranked fifth in the UK's first University Global Health Research League Table.
27.01.2015
IXV into position
IXV installed on its payload adapter The IXV Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle installed on its payload adapter, on 26 January 2015 at Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana.
Earth Sciences - Environmental Sciences
27.01.2015
Long dry spell doomed Mexican city 1,000 years ago
Archaeologists continue to debate the reasons for the collapse of many Central American cities and states, from Teotihuacan in Mexico to the Yucatan Maya, and climate change is considered one of the major causes.
Business/Economics - Law/Forensics
27.01.2015
Tax reform could reduce wealth inequality gap, Stanford scholar says
Stanford Law Professor Joseph Bankman discusses eight tax policies aimed at reducing inequality among the wealthiest Americans and the rest of society.
Arts and Design - Computer Science/Telecom
27.01.2015
Stanford's 'Live Context' series explores art and its ideas
Stanford’s ’Live Context’ series explores art and its ideas
Leveraging the university's deep intellectual and artistic resources, "Live Context" is inspired by the conviction that the more you know about a work of art's historical and contemporary resonance the richer your experience.
Social Sciences - Administration/Government
27.01.2015
New research compares inequalities in UK's child safeguarding systems
Why are children from poor neighbourhoods more likely to be subject to a child protection intervention than those living in better off areas? And is deprivation the primary cause? Researchers at The University of Nottingham are involved in a major new research project to study inequalities in child welfare systems across the UK.
Computer Science/Telecom - Medicine/Pharmacology
27.01.2015
Bristol gets smarter with launch of ground-breaking innovation project
Bristol is set to see the launch of its first joint venture between the city council and the University of Bristol.
Psychology - Medicine/Pharmacology
27.01.2015
World Cup ref blows the whistle on mental health
Former international rugby referee Clive Norling presided over more than 1,000 matches in a career lasting almost 25 years, including 35 test matches and the quarter-final of the first ever Rugby World Cup in 1987.
Life Sciences
27.01.2015
Why Do We Feel Thirst?
Why Do We Feel Thirst?
To fight dehydration on a hot summer day, you instinctively crave the relief provided by a tall glass of water.
Astronomy
27.01.2015
Striking lightning
ESA Space in Images Title Striking lightning from space Released 27/01/2015 11:28 am Copyright ESA/NASA Description Lightning illuminates the area it strikes on Earth but the flash can be seen from space, too.
Computer Science/Telecom - Business/Economics
27.01.2015
Oxford named a key founder of Alan Turing Institute
The Institute will build on the UK's existing academic strengths and help position the country as a world leader in the analysis and application of big data and algorithm research.
Environmental Sciences
27.01.2015
The burning issue of the world’s vulnerable carbon sinks
Changing climate conditions and increasing occurrences of wildfires may leave globally important carbon stocks defenceless, new research shows.
Astronomy
27.01.2015
Replica solar system
Replica solar system
Scientists have located an ancient solar system, dating back to the dawn of the galaxy, which appears to be a miniature version of the inner planets in our own solar system. An international research group, including Yale University professors of astronomy Sarbani Basu and Debra Fischer, announced the discovery Jan.
Astronomy
27.01.2015
Black Hole Chokes on a Swallowed Star
Black Hole Chokes on a Swallowed Star
FORT DAVIS, Texas - A five-year analysis of an event captured by a tiny telescope at McDonald Observatory and followed up by telescopes on the ground and in space has led astronomers to believe they witnessed a giant black hole tear apart a star.
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences
27.01.2015
Spider electro-combs its sticky nano-filaments
A spider commonly found in garden centres in Britain is giving fresh insights into how to spin incredibly long and strong fibres just a few nanometres thick. The majority of spiders spin silk threads several micrometres thick but unusually the 'garden centre spider' or 'feather-legged lace weaver' Uloborus plumipes can spin nano-scale filaments.
Business/Economics - Medicine/Pharmacology
27.01.2015
Novartis delivered solid sales growth, margin expansion and pipeline progress in 2014; portfolio transformation will focus company on leading businesses
Net sales grew in FY 2014, with strong core margin expansion Net sales increased 1% (+3% cc ) to USD 58.0 billion in FY (Q4: -2%, +4% cc) Operating income grew 1% (+7% cc) to USD 10.7 billion
Administration/Government - Social Sciences
27.01.2015
Youngest children and poorer households worst hit by Coalition’s selective cuts
Major new report, entitled 'Social Policy in a Cold Climate', find it is the poor, not the rich, who have carried the burden of austerity.
Agronomy/Food Science
27.01.2015
Scientists call for soil mapping program to help Indian agriculture
Scientists call for soil mapping program to help Indian agriculture
Scientists attending an agriculture workshop in India organised by the University of Sydney have called for a detailed soil mapping program to help policy makers and farmers draw up effective land management proposals.
Medicine/Pharmacology
27.01.2015
3D copy of patient's heart
A 3D printed model of a patient's heart has been used by surgeons to help plan how to fix the heart.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
27.01.2015
Study explores historical influences on health policy
Study explores historical influences on health policy
University of Liverpool medical historian, Professor Sally Sheard , has been appointed as a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator to study the development of health policy in Britain since the launch of the National Health Service in 1948.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
27.01.2015
Biology, driven by data
Biology, driven by data
Cells are incredibly complicated machines with thousands of interacting parts - and disruptions to any of those interactions can cause disease.
Medicine/Pharmacology
27.01.2015
Is the medical match fair?
When medical-school graduates apply for their residencies, they use a centralized clearinghouse that matches applicants with jobs.
Medicine/Pharmacology
27.01.2015
New Dean for Nursing and Midwifery
Professor Donna Waters has commenced her role as the University's new Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery.
Administration/Government - Medicine/Pharmacology
27.01.2015
Inside Operation Boring, the LNP's strategy to reclaim Queensland
By John Harrison If Queensland's Liberal National Party reclaims government at this Saturday's election, you can be sure the politicians will be quick to take the credit.
Life Sciences
27.01.2015
Sharks aren't criminals, but our fear makes us talk as if they are
By Adrian Peace Sharks have been making news yet again, after a spate of sightings in Newcastle, New South Wales, prompted days of beach closures and reports of oceangoers allegedly being “ stalked ” by “ monster ” specimens.
Administration/Government
27.01.2015
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
26.01.2015
Rosetta watches comet shed its dusty coat
ESA's Rosetta mission is providing unique insight into the life cycle of a comet's dusty surface, watching 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it sheds the dusty coat it has accumulated over the past four years. The COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser, or COSIMA, is one of Rosetta's three dust analysis experiments.
Business/Economics
26.01.2015
Identify HR’s role for M&A deals to succeed
HR needs to adapt to the right role for the many different types of mergers and acquisitions to improve the chance of the deal being a success, says new research. Most mergers and acquisitions are doomed to failure, when a deal that looks great on paper comes undone because of human issues, like a clash of cultures.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
26.01.2015
Study explores key influences on British health policy
Study explores key influences on British health policy
University of Liverpool medical historian, Professor Sally Sheard , has been appointed as a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator to study the development of health policy in Britain since the launch of the National Health Service in 1948.
Literature/Linguistics - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.01.2015
One in five online scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot'
One in five online scholarly articles affected by ’reference rot’
Science & Innovation Home » Science & Engineering Capabilities Research Library Publications Science Briefs Science Programs Science Pillars Science Organizations Science Features Collaboration Home » Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation Fellows Postdocs, Students Conferences User Facilities Pathogen
Law/Forensics
26.01.2015
Does the First Amendment need a New Deal?
Does the First Amendment need a New Deal?
The terrorist attack on the office of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical magazine in Paris, sparked a heated debate on the freedom of speech around the world.
Computer Science/Telecom
26.01.2015
Researcher talks about his involvement in the film Ex-Machina
Researcher talks about his involvement in the film Ex-Machina
An Imperial researcher talks about his role as an advisor on the latest science fiction film currently out in the cinemas.
History/Archeology - Event
26.01.2015
Site of Brunel’s ss Great Britain ‘shipwreck’ located in Northern Ireland
Archaeologists have located the exact position where the ss Great Britain was grounded for nearly a year during her fifth voyage to New York in 1846.
Astronomy - Environmental Sciences
26.01.2015
Satellites for peat’s sake
Satellites can help us to safeguard nature's richest carbon storehouses - peatlands. Peatlands make up just 3% of land but capture twice as much carbon as all forests combined.
Event - Media Sciences/Political Sciences
26.01.2015
Foreign correspondent Richard Engel will be Stanford’s 2015 Commencement speaker
Engel, a veteran war correspondent and Stanford alumnus who has covered international events for nearly two decades, will deliver the 124th Commencement address.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Careers/Employment
26.01.2015
The Blue Shield and Sutter Health impasse and what it means to Stanford employees
The recent contract renewal negotiations between Blue Shield and Sutter Health have many employees feeling uneasy.
Business/Economics
26.01.2015
Super Bowl ads not profitable for competing brands, Stanford scholar says
A Stanford study finds that Super Bowl television commercials for beer and soda may generate sales, but when two major brands of the same type run competing ads, the sales benefits disappear. The Super Bowl is the most watched American TV spectacle, and companies annually put forth their biggest efforts to make stunning commercials aimed at creating impressions and buzz.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.01.2015
Stanford bioengineers develop tool for reprogramming genetic code
By selectively manipulating how DNA issues biological commands, Stanford bioengineers have developed a tool that could prove useful in future gene therapies. Biology relies upon the precise activation of specific genes to work properly. If that sequence gets out of whack, or one gene turns on only partially, the outcome can often lead to a disease.
Medicine/Pharmacology
26.01.2015
Ethnic minorities and deprived communities hardest hit by air pollution
Ethnic minorities and deprived communities hardest hit by air pollution
A new study has found big differences in air pollution across communities in England, with deprived and ethnic minority areas the worst affected. Air pollution levels are linked to many forms of ill health, including higher risk of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, especially for more vulnerable groups such as children and the elderly.
Business/Economics - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.01.2015
Want to kickstart the Canadian economy? Try "indovation", says U of’T prof
University of Toronto president Meric Gertler is visiting India from January 27 to 31, on his first visit to south Asia since becoming president.
Business/Economics
26.01.2015
Look what happens when researchers from one of the world's top ten computer science departments launch a startup
MaRS Innovation and the University of Toronto have announced that the founders of Granata Decision Systems Inc., a graduate of the University of Toronto Early-Stage Technology (UTEST) start-up incubator program, have joined Google Inc.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
26.01.2015
Researchers at Penn, Berkeley and Illinois Use Oxides to Flip Graphene Conductivity
Graphene, a one-atom thick lattice of carbon atoms, is often touted as a revolutionary material that will take the place of silicon at the heart of electronics. The unmatched speed at which it can move electrons, plus its essentially two-dimensional form factor, make it an attractive alternative, but several hurdles to its adoption remain.
Environmental Sciences - Earth Sciences
26.01.2015
Susan Kidwell receives Mary Clark Thompson Medal
The National Academy of Sciences has awarded the 2015 Mary Clark Thompson Medal to geologist Susan Kidwell , the William Rainey Harper Professor in Geophysical Sciences and the Committee on Evolutionary Biology at the University of Chicago.
Arts and Design
26.01.2015
The Quadrangle Club Revels Presents ’Any Resemblance: A Revels Selfie’
The Quadrangle Club Revels will return for its annual musical revue in Any Resemblance: A Revels Selfie , taking place at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, Jan.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
26.01.2015
Good bedtime habits equal better sleep for kids
Several potential reasons for poor sleep include the use of technology in the bedroom, complicated and busy daily schedules with competing work, school, social, and recreational activities as well as neighborhood noise from vehicular traffic, commercial or industrial activity and neighbors. UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa.
Earth Sciences - Astronomy
26.01.2015
3 Questions: Dara Entekhabi on NASA's soil-moisture mission
3 Questions: Dara Entekhabi on NASA’s soil-moisture mission
Dara Entekhabi, an MIT professor of civil and environmental engineering and of earth, atmospheric and planetary sciences, is the science team leader of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, scheduled to be launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Jan.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
26.01.2015
Intrepid projects backed by Bose Grants
What if the unique properties of diamond could be harnessed for use in electronics? What if a light bulb could operate at 100 percent efficiency? What if the search for extraterrestrial life could be abetted by a deeper understanding of the chemistry of life on Earth? All of these ideas would be considered big "ifs" by many.
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences
26.01.2015
Five NY companies receive jump start from Cornell
Five New York state companies have received JumpStart grants for spring 2015.
Medicine/Pharmacology
26.01.2015
Yale cardiac surgeon helps famed football ref get back in the game
Cardiac surgeon Dr. John Elefteriades, the William W.L. Glenn professor of surgery at Yale School of Medicine, has treated more than 10,000 patients in his over three-decade career.
Architecture - Arts and Design
26.01.2015
Heavenly matters, earthly delights
In his book, Gothic Wonder, Professor Paul Binski explores a period in which English art and architecture pushed the boundaries to produce some of Europe's most spectacular buildings and illuminated manuscripts.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.01.2015
Zombie bacteria in tuberculosis
Zombie bacteria in tuberculosis
"Living-dead" bacteria exist in limbo: biologically active but not proliferating. Buried in this zombie state, disease-causing bacteria could come back from the dead to re-infect patients. Researchers at EPFL have produced the first evidence of this strange phenomenon in tuberculosis, suggesting new avenues for treatment.
Administration/Government
26.01.2015
How can we protect our information in the era of cloud computing?
Private information would be much more secure if individuals moved away from cloud-based storage towards peer-to-peer systems, where data is stored in a variety of ways and across a variety of sites, argues a University of Cambridge researcher.
Life Sciences
26.01.2015
Caterpillar discovery hailed a "wonderful piece of evolution"
A new caterpillar has been discovered with the unique ability to make its cocoon out of flakes of dried resin - a sticky substance exuded from trees that hardens over time. The research team, led by Professor William Symondson from Cardiff University School of Biosciences, discovered the caterpillar at the Danau Girang Field Station in the forests of Borneo.
Astronomy - Earth Sciences
25.01.2015
Ancient and cratered
ESA Space in Images Title Jupiter's cratered moon, Callisto Released 26/01/2015 10:00 am Copyright NASA/JPL/DLR Description The speckled object depicted here is Callisto, Jupiter's second largest moon.
Life Sciences - Computer Science/Telecom
25.01.2015
Neuroscience to Benefit from Hybrid Supercomputer Memory
Neuroscience to Benefit from Hybrid Supercomputer Memory
To handle large amounts of data from detailed brain models, IBM, EPFL, and ETH Zürich are collaborating on a new hybrid memory strategy for supercomputers.
Life Sciences - Computer Science/Telecom
25.01.2015
HBP Summit Showcases Successes of Year One
HBP Summit Showcases Successes of Year One
Heidelberg. The second annual summit of the Human Brain Project (HBP) begins today at the University of Heidelberg. Nearly 400 participants from a dozen countries will present their key results and discuss the future challenges facing global collaborative brain research. Having expanded to 112 Partners in 24 countries in its first year, the HBP is well-placed to set new the frontiers of neuroscience, medicine, and computing.
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
24.01.2015
Blood flow image voted supporters' favourite in BHF competition
Blood flow image voted supporters’ favourite in BHF competition
An image showing a computer model of blood flow has been voted the British Heart Foundation supporters' favourite in a science image competition. ‘Lifelines', by Francesco Iori from the Department of Aeronautics , was one of four images from Imperial College London shortlisted for ‘Reflections of Research' , which showcases images produced by BHF-funded researchers.
Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
Novartis Bexsero vaccine approved by FDA for the prevention of meningitis B, the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in the US
With today's approval, Bexsero is now licensed in 37 countries; since first approval in Europe, over 1 million doses have been distributed worldwide Bexsero's two-dose regimen offers a flexib
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Physics/Materials Science
23.01.2015
Material can be both magnetic and electrically charged
Material can be both magnetic and electrically charged
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have controlled the structure of a material to simultaneously generate both magnetisation and electrical polarisation, an advance which has potential applications in information storage and processing.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
Five intriguing facts about viruses that cause measles, Ebola and other scourges
Viruses are incredibly simple, arguably the most simple living organisms on the planet. They have no brains, no metabolism, and they can't reproduce on their own.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
23.01.2015
Integral manoeuvres for the future
Since 2002, ESA's Integral spacecraft has been observing some of the most violent events in the Universe, including gamma-ray bursts and black holes.
Sport Sciences
23.01.2015
OCR complaint statement
A complaint has been filed with the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights (OCR), against the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities.  The complaint alleges discrimination in inte
Physics/Materials Science
23.01.2015
Catch the Northern Lights with your mobile
Catch the Northern Lights with your mobile
Updates on the best opportunities to spot the Northern Lights in the UK are now available on a mobile phone app developed in association with scientists at Lancaster University.
Pedagogy/Education Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
$3.9 million project will identify, treat Washington state toddlers at risk for autism
$3.9 million project will identify, treat Washington state toddlers at risk for autism
Early detection can make a world of difference for toddlers with autism, but many children do not get diagnosed until they're at least 4 years old.
Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
Novartis drug Jakavi recommended by CHMP for EU approval to treat adults with rare blood cancer polycythemia vera
Polycythemia vera (PV) is associated with overproduction of blood cells that can cause serious cardiovascular complications, such as stroke and heart attack Clinical data show Jakavi (ruxol
Psychology - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
‘Kindness curriculum’ boosts school success in preschoolers
Over the course of 12 weeks, twice a week, the pre-kindergarten students learned their ABCs. Attention, breath and body, caring practice - clearly not the standard letters of the alphabet. Rather, these 4- and-5-year-olds in the Madison Metropolitan School District were part of a study assessing a new curriculum meant to promote social, emotional and academic skills, conducted by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Investigating Healthy Minds (CIHM) at the Waisman Center.
Sport Sciences - Life Sciences
23.01.2015
Concussions – an issue for male and female athletes alike, Stanford professor says
Concussions – an issue for male and female athletes alike, Stanford professor says
William Maloney, professor of orthopaedic surgery, told the Faculty Senate on Thursday that while concussions are a problem in football, they also are a big concern in other sports, including soccer, basketball and club sports, involving both male and female players.
Literature/Linguistics - Philosophy
23.01.2015
Stanford scholar explores Arabic obsession with language
Stanford scholar explores Arabic obsession with language
Through a study of metaphor in medieval Arabic literature, Stanford comparative literature professor Alexander Key finds that the Arab world had a head start on the West when it comes to understanding how language works.
Environmental Sciences - Business/Economics
23.01.2015
Larry Linden: Big changes needed to avert possible climate "catastrophe"
After a career that included work as a White House advisor in the Carter administration and as a partner at Goldman Sachs, Larry Linden SM '70, PhD '76 has turned his attention to what he says is the most critical issue facing humanity today: the threat of catastrophic global climate change.
Philosophy
23.01.2015
New sports centre building to be named after Olympic rower Acer Nethercott
Oxford University is to name the first phase of its new sports centre at Iffley Road after Olympic rower and scholar Dr Acer Nethercott.
Environmental Sciences - Business/Economics
23.01.2015
Calculating the future of solar-fuel refineries
A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has developed a new tool to help plot the future of solar fuels.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
23.01.2015
Medicaid "Fee Bump" to Primary Care Doctors Associated with Better Access to Appointments, According to Penn Study
As the United States population has doubled since 1955, the number of inpatient psychiatric beds in the United States has been cut by nearly 95 percent to just 45,000, a wholly inadequate equation when considering that there are currently 10 million U.S. residents with serious mental illness.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
Study Uncovers Secrets of a Clump-Dissolving Protein
Workhorse molecules called heat-shock proteins contribute to refolding proteins that were once misfolded and clumped, causing such disorders as Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. James Shorter, PhD , an associate professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania , has been developing ways to "reprogram" one such protein - a yeast protein called Hsp104 - to improve its therapeutic properties.
Earth Sciences - Environmental Sciences
23.01.2015
Aletsch
ESA Space in Images Title Aletsch Glacier Released 23/01/2015 10:00 am Copyright USGS/ESA Description Parts of the Swiss and Italian Alps are pictured in this satellite image.
Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
Researcher takes top spot in national image competition
A University of Leeds researcher has been named the winner of the British Heart Foundation (BHF) image competition.
Earth Sciences - Environmental Sciences
23.01.2015
A 3-D View of the Greenland Ice Sheet Opens Window on Ice History
A 3-D View of the Greenland Ice Sheet Opens Window on Ice History
AUSTIN, Texas -  Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA's Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet, opening a window on past climate conditions and the ice sheet's potentially perilous future.
Astronomy - Environmental Sciences
23.01.2015
Satellites catch Austfonna shedding ice
Rapid ice loss in a remote Arctic ice cap has been detected by the Sentinel-1A and CryoSat satellites. Located on Norway's Nordaustlandet island in the Svalbard archipelago, parts of the Austfonna ice cap have thinned by more than 50 m since 2012 - about a sixth of the ice's thickness. Over the last two decades, ice loss from the southeast region of Austfonna has increased significantly, and ice thinning has spread over 50 km inland and is now within 10 km of the summit.
Environmental Sciences - Life Sciences
23.01.2015
Research to help farmers address environmental challenges of climate change
Charles Anderson (left), assistant professor of biology, and undergraduate researcher Liam Farrell examine the growth and development of Brachypodium plants.
Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
University of Sydney helping to build health capacity in Fiji
A newly refurbished centre dedicated to improving the health of women and children was today opened in Vatukarasa on Fiji's Coral Coast by Fijian Prime Minister Rear Admiral (rtd) J.V.Bainimarama.
Literature/Linguistics
23.01.2015
Advancing the appreciation of Australian literature through new Chair
In a first for Victoria, the Boisbouvier Founding Chair in Australian Literature has been established at the University of Melbourne to advance the teaching, understanding and public appreciation of Australian literature.
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
23.01.2015
Astronomy
22.01.2015
Comet close-ups
Crack extension in Anuket This OSIRIS narrow-angle camera image shows part of a large fracture running across Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's neck, in particular where it has left Hapi and is extending into Anuket. In this orientation, the Seth region is at the uppermost left and Hapi in the lower left.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
22.01.2015
Getting to know Rosetta’s comet
Rosetta is revealing its host comet as having a remarkable array of surface features and with many processes contributing to its activity, painting a complex picture of its evolution.
Psychology - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.01.2015
Comment: Well-being programmes in schools might be doing children more harm than good
Kathryn Ecclestone, Professor of Education at the University of Sheffield, comments on the effects of well-being programmes in schools. by Katherine Ecclestone, 22 January 2015, posted on The Conversation Apocryphal depictions of an unprecedented crisis in young people's mental ill-health and their general vulnerability have been accompanied by increasingly alarmist claims that only schools can address this social "ticking time bomb".
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
22.01.2015
Exotic, gigantic molecules fit inside each other like Russian nesting dolls
University of Chicago scientists have experimentally observed for the first time a phenomenon in ultracold, three-atom molecules predicted by Russian theoretical physicist Vitaly Efimov in 1970. In this quantum phenomenon, called geometric scaling, the triatomic molecules fit inside one another like an infinitely large set of Russian nesting dolls.
Environmental Sciences - Business/Economics
22.01.2015
Boston’s natural gas infrastructure releases high levels of heat-trapping methane
Harvard-led study reveals aging natural gas distribution system short-changes customers, contributes to greenhouse gas buildup - Imagine if every time you filled your car with gas, a few gallons didn't make it into the tank and instead spilled onto the ground.
Administration/Government - Careers/Employment
22.01.2015
Faculty member to share research at special White House meeting
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. College of Education faculty member  Liza Conyers  will share her expertise on HIV and workforce development at a special White House meeting on Monday (Jan.
Environmental Sciences - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
22.01.2015
A new public private collaboration in Singapore aims to develop more eco-friendly ships
‌Singapore's Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Sembcorp Marine, the University of Glasgow and University of Glasgow Singapore (UGS) have signed an agreement to collaborate and d
Physics/Materials Science - Mathematics
22.01.2015
Is glass a true solid?
Does glass ever stop flowing? Researchers at the University of Bristol and Kyoto University have combined computer simulation and information theory, originally invented for telephone communication and cryptography, to answer this puzzling question. Watching a glass blower at work we can clearly see the liquid nature of hot glass.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
22.01.2015
Scientists set quantum speed limit
University of California, Berkeley, scientists have proved a fundamental relationship between energy and time that sets a "quantum speed limit" on processes ranging from quantum computing and tunneling to optical switching. The speed limit, that is, the minimal time to transition between two easily distinguishable states, such as the north and south poles representing up and down states of a quantum spin (top), is characterized by a well-known relationship.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.01.2015
Rare neurological disease shines light on health of essential nerve cells
Ian Duncan is a Scotsman with the iron discipline and stamina of a competitive marathoner, triathlete and cross-country skier.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.01.2015
Trust your gut: E. coli may hold one of the keys to treating Parkinson's
Trust your gut: E. coli may hold one of the keys to treating Parkinson’s
ANN ARBOR-E. coli usually brings to mind food poisoning and beach closures, but researchers recently discovered a protein in E. coli that inhibits the accumulation of potentially toxic amyloids-a hallmark of diseases such as Parkinson's. Amyloids are formed by proteins that misfold and group together, and when amyloids assemble at the wrong place or time, they can damage brain tissue and cause cell death, according to Marger
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
22.01.2015
Exotic, giantic molecules fit inside each other like Russian nesting dolls
University of Chicago scientists have experimentally observed for the first time a phenomenon in ultracold, three-atom molecules predicted by Russian theoretical physicsist Vitaly Efimov in 1970. In this quantum phenomenon, called geometric scaling, the triatomic molecules fit inside one another like an infinitely large set of Russian nesting dolls.
Environmental Sciences - Astronomy
22.01.2015
Scientists team with indigenous people to study carbon in Amazon rainforest
Scientists team with indigenous people to study carbon in Amazon rainforest
By teaching basic ecology field work techniques to indigenous groups in the Amazon, Stanford researchers have found that satellite measurements of rainforests in the area underestimate the region's carbon storage potential. When it comes to measuring the carbon storage potential of the Amazon forest, indigenous people might outperform sophisticated satellites.
Environmental Sciences
22.01.2015
California's Policies Can Significantly Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions through 2030
California’s Policies Can Significantly Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions through 2030
A new model of the impact of California's existing and proposed policies on its greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goals suggests that the state is on track to meet 2020 goals, and could achieve greater emission reductions by 2030, but the state will need to do more to reach its 2050 climate goals.
Earth Sciences - Astronomy
22.01.2015
Mysteries in Nili Fossae
These new images from the high-resolution stereo camera on ESA's Mars Express show Nili Fossae, one of the most enticing regions on Mars.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
22.01.2015
Brookings Tops List of Penn’s 2014 Global Go To Think Tank Index Rankings
The increase in Medicaid reimbursement for primary care providers, a key provision of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), was associated with a 7.7 percentage points increase in new patient appointment availability without longer wait times, according to results of a new 10-state study - co-authored by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the Urban Institute, and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - published online-first by the New England Journal of Medicine .
Philosophy - Social Sciences
22.01.2015
Is cheating on the field worse than cheating on a spouse? Some fans think so
Is cheating on the field worse than cheating on a spouse? Some fans think so
ANN ARBOR-Why did fans and sponsors such as Nike drop Lance Armstrong but stay loyal to Tiger Woods? Probably because Armstrong's doping scandal took place on the field, unlike Wood's off-the-field extramarital affairs, according to new studies.
Astronomy - Social Sciences
22.01.2015
Black hole on a diet creates a 'changing look' quasar
Yale University astronomers have identified the first "changing look" quasar, a gleaming object in deep space that appears to have its own dimmer switch. The discovery may offer a glimpse into the life story of the universe's great beacons. Quasars are massive, luminous objects that draw their energy from black holes.
Administration/Government - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.01.2015
New program reduces hospitalizations for youth with psychosis
New program reduces hospitalizations for youth with psychosis
Providing coordinated care to young people who experience their first psychotic episode reduces hospitalization costs and helps patients continue to work and go to school, according to a new study scheduled to appear online Feb.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Astronomy
22.01.2015
UCLA and CASIS to collaborate on International Space Station study of possible therapy for bone loss
NASA A study of rodents on the International Space Station will allow astronauts to test the ability of a bone-forming molecule to direct stem cells to induce bone formation.
Environmental Sciences - Business/Economics
22.01.2015
Boston’s leaky pipes release high levels of heat-trapping methane
Harvard-led study reveals aging natural gas distribution system short-changes customers, contributes to greenhouse gas buildup - Imagine if every time you filled your car with gas, a few gallons didn't make it into the tank and instead spilled onto the ground.
Environmental Sciences
22.01.2015
UQ staff save cash and carbon with energy competition
University of Queensland staff have collectively prevented 77 tonnes of carbon emissions and saved $7600 in electricity costs during a three-week competition aimed at reducing energy consumption in laboratories.
Social Sciences
22.01.2015
Retreating from Darfur? A decade on, spectre of atrocities returns
By Phil Orchard News media have been reporting widespread atrocities by Boko Haram against as many as 2000 civilians in Nigeria.
Medicine/Pharmacology
21.01.2015
Novartis announces FDA approval for first IL-17A antagonist Cosentyx(TM) (secukinumab) for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis patients
Offering a new treatment option for patients, Cosentyx is the first approved human monoclonal antibody (mAb) that selectively binds to interleukin IL-17A , Phase III data demonstrated Cosentyx resulted in clear or almost clear skin in the majority of patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis Approval based on the efficacy and safety outcomes from 10 Phase II and III studies which included over 3,990 adult patients with mo
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
21.01.2015
Death of a dynamo - a hard drive from space
Hidden magnetic messages contained within ancient meteorites are providing a unique window into the processes that shaped our solar system, and may give a sneak preview of the fate of the Earth's core as it continues to freeze.
Astronomy
21.01.2015
SPIDER Experiment Touches Down in Antarctica
SPIDER Experiment Touches Down in Antarctica
After spending 16 days suspended from a giant helium balloon floating 115,000 feet above Antarctica, a scientific instrument dubbed SPIDER has landed in a remote region of the frozen continent.
Astronomy
21.01.2015
Let there be light
ESA Space in Images Title ESA's Optical Ground Station laser tags ISS Released 21/01/2015 3:21 pm Copyright Victor R. Ruiz Description The future of space
Literature/Linguistics - Life Sciences
21.01.2015
Chinese Academy of Sciences and EPFL Renew Agreement in Davos
Chinese Academy of Sciences and EPFL Renew Agreement in Davos
The agreement signed in 2010 between the Chinese Academy of Sciences and EPFL was renewed yesterday, a few hours before the WEF opening ceremony in Davos, in the presence of Chinese Premier Li Keqi
Business/Economics
21.01.2015
Doing it for the team: Business study tests motivational techniques
Every year, U.S. companies spend billions on incentives for salespeople, and although incentives can help boost sales figures, the associated costs cut into the bottom line in a big way.