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# "Science Wire" gives access to latest science news from research centers and R&D companies.
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Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
01.08.2014
New oncology centre to focus on personalised cancer care
New oncology centre to focus on personalised cancer care
Research into skin, blood and breast cancers has been ramped up in Queensland with the opening of the southern hemisphere's largest and most sophisticated genome sequencing centre. The $2 million Diamantina Individualised Oncology Care Centre (DIOCC), based at The University of Queensland's Diamantina Institute , is funded by the Australian Cancer Research Foundation (ACRF).
History/Archeology
31.07.2014
Psychology - Life Sciences
31.07.2014
Goalkeepers prone to 'gambler's fallacy' but penalty takers fail to exploit it
Goalkeepers prone to ’gambler’s fallacy’ but penalty takers fail to exploit it
After a string of penalties aimed in the same direction, goalkeepers are more likely to dive in the opposite direction on the next penalty but kickers fail to exploit this pattern, finds new UCL research.
Astronomy - Earth Sciences
31.07.2014
Looking Forward to 2020 . . . on Mars
Looking Forward to 2020 . . . on Mars
While the Curiosity rover continues to interrogate Gale Crater on Mars, planning is well under way for its successor-another rover that is currently referred to as Mars 2020 .
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Business/Economics
31.07.2014
Carnegie Mellon’s Erica Fuchs Discusses How Global Redistribution of Manufacturing Is Changing Innovation
Press Release: Carnegie Mellon's Erica Fuchs Discusses How Global Redistribution of Manufacturing Is Changing Innovation-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University PITTSBURGH—Location, location, location.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
31.07.2014
Incyte collaborates with Genentech to evaluate combination of two novel cancer immunotherapies
Incyte Corporation announced a clinical trial agreement with Genentech, a subsidiary of Roche, to evaluate the safety, tolerability and preliminary efficacy of Incyte's oral indoleamine dioxygenase-1
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
31.07.2014
Engineering to lead new NSF-funded cybersecurity research center
Engineering to lead new NSF-funded cybersecurity research center
The UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science is leading a new multi-institution research center on cybersecurity that is funded by a major grant from the National Science Foundation.
Environmental Sciences - Computer Science/Telecom
31.07.2014
Stanford's Water in the West program offers new way to view groundwater resources
Stanford’s Water in the West program offers new way to view groundwater resources
New website, with interactive graphics, illustrates problems caused by California's over-tapped aquifers.
Environmental Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
31.07.2014
Effects of biomass burning on climate, health
Agricultural burning, like this farmer's burning of rice straw, contributes significantly to climate change and adverse health effects, according to a study by Stanford Professor Mark Z. Jacobson.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
31.07.2014
On the sunny side, nurses dispense better care
For the health and happiness of nurses - and for the best care of hospital patients - let the sunshine in.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
31.07.2014
Roche and Canadian venture capital fund AmorChem jointly focus on myotonic muscular dystrophy 1
Roche and AmorChem announced a collaboration to discover novel small molecule disease-modifying therapy for the treatment of myotonic muscular dystrophy 1 (known as Steinert's disease).
Social Sciences
31.07.2014
New book examines the known and unknown about OCD
New book examines the known and unknown about OCD
New book examines the known and unknown about OCD A new and thorough overview of a disturbing behavioural condition that will affect 2.3 per cent of the UK population in their lifetime has been written by University of Sussex researchers.
Environmental Sciences
31.07.2014
Program stitches together STEM, fashion design
Program stitches together STEM, fashion design
A Smart Clothing, Smart Girls participant experiments with the properties of non-Newtonian fluids, which are sometimes used in impact-protective clothing.
Astronomy
31.07.2014
ATV set loose
Title ATV-5 separation from Ariane 5 Released 31/07/2014 Length 00:01:14 Language English Footage Type Exterior shot Copyright ESA/Arianespace Description These images we
Medicine/Pharmacology
31.07.2014
Drug-resistant malaria has spread across Southeast Asia
Pediatric High Dependency Unit, Kilifi District Hospital Children attended to by Dr Neema Mturi. The KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme is a partnership between KEMRI, Oxford University and the Wellcome Trust. It conducts basic, epidemiological and clinical research from its headquarters in the rural district of Kilifi, Kenya Copyright © Alex Kamweru / Oxford University Images - All rights reserved.
Social Sciences - Arts and Design
31.07.2014
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
31.07.2014
Protein that fuels repair of treatment-resistant cancer cells
ANN ARBOR-Imagine you're fighting for your life but no matter how hard you hit, your opponent won't go down. The same can be said of highly treatment-resistant cancers, such as head and neck cancer, where during radiation and chemotherapy some cancer cells repair themselves, survive and thrive. Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the world, but the late detection and treatment resistance result in a high mortality rate.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
31.07.2014
New graphene framework bridges gap between traditional capacitors, batteries
New graphene framework bridges gap between traditional capacitors, batteries
Researchers at the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) at UCLA have set the stage for a watershed in mobile energy storage by using a special graphene material to significantly boost the energy density of electrochemical capacitors, putting them on a par with lead acid batteries.
Medicine/Pharmacology
31.07.2014
Baby bonus blues ahead for mothers
Young mothers who are not in the paid workforce or are marginally employed will be significantly disadvantaged by the removal of the Baby Bonus.  According to new research from the University of M
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
30.07.2014
KAE609 shows promise as next generation treatment for malaria
KAE609 is the first antimalarial drug candidate with a novel mechanism of action to achieve positive clinical proof-of-concept in over 20 years KAE609 was tested in adult patients with uncomplicated malaria and showed a median parasite clearance time of 12 hours, including in patients with resistant infections For more than a decade, Novartis has been a leader in the fight against malaria, setting the current gold standard for tre
Astronomy - History/Archeology
30.07.2014
Victorian scientists' drawings of nebulae explored in new book
Before the Hubble telescope, Victorian scientists used pencil and paper to record their observations of the stars.
Event
30.07.2014
Engineers to announce successful installation of experimental Asian Carp sonic deterrent system at Lock & Dam 8
University researcher and Corps of Engineers to announce successful installation of experimental Asian Carp sonic deterrent system at Lock & Dam 8 WHAT: Members of the media are invited to join
Astronomy
30.07.2014
Costa Concordia tow
Title Towing the Costa Concordia Released 30/07/2014 4:40 pm Copyright ESA Description This Sentinel-1A image was acquired on 26 July 2014 over the coast of northwestern Italy while the Costa Concordia cruise ship (enlarged) was being towed towards the city of Genoa.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
30.07.2014
Penn Medicine: Competition Seeks Experts in Science and Machine Learning to Predict and Detect Seizures
Penn Medicine: Competition Seeks Experts in Science and Machine Learning to Predict and Detect Seizures
Epilepsy affects more than 50 million people worldwide. The disorder is caused by abnormal electrical activity in the brain that can bring about seizures, changes in awareness or sensation and behavior.
Environmental Sciences - Chemistry
30.07.2014
Scientists head to tropical rainforests for climate study
30 Jul 2014 Scientists from The University of Manchester have teamed up with colleagues in Brazil to venture into the Amazonian rainforest to take part in a pioneering study of the gases emitted by trees which could help us better predict climate change.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Literature/Linguistics
30.07.2014
Medical libraries go online for all
The University of Leeds is joining forces with one of the world's major resources for the study of medical history as part of a project to create a comprehensive online resource.
Astronomy - Earth Sciences
30.07.2014
Lifetime of gravity measurements heralds new beginning
30 July 2014 Although ESA's GOCE satellite is no more, all of the measurements it gathered during its life skirting the fringes our atmosphere, including the very last as it drifted slowly back to Earth, have been drawn together to offer new opportunities for science. Carrying the first 3D gravity sensor in space, this state-of-the-art satellite measured Earth's gravity with unprecedented accuracy.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
30.07.2014
Penn Physics/Medicine Receives $2.8 Million Grant for Stroke Research
Penn Physics/Medicine Receives $2.8 Million Grant for Stroke Research
The National Institutes of Health have awarded University of Pennsylvania researchers a five-year, $2.8 million grant to further research on techniques for monitoring blood flow in the brain following strokes.
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
30.07.2014
Cyber-crime costs region's businesses almost £107 million a year – a new report reveals
Cyber-crime costs region’s businesses almost £107 million a year – a new report reveals
A report into the cyber security market in the North West has revealed that online criminal activity is costing key sectors in the regional economy almost £107 million a year – threatening growth, businesses and jobs.
Environmental Sciences - Life Sciences
30.07.2014
Scientists challenge theory on protection of threatened species
Scientists challenge theory on protection of threatened species
Instead of simply concentrating conservation efforts on threatened species, resource managers and policymakers should consider ecosystem-wide impacts, study's authors write.
Physics/Materials Science
30.07.2014
Watching Schrodinger's cat die
Watching Schrodinger’s cat die
One of the famous examples of the weirdness of quantum mechanics is the paradox of Schrödinger's cat. If you put a cat inside an opaque box and make his life dependent on a random event, when does the cat die? When the random event occurs, or when you open the box? Though common sense suggests the former, quantum mechanics - or at least the most common "Copenhagen” interpretation enunciated by Danish physicist Neils Bohr in the 1920s - says it's the latter.
Astronomy
30.07.2014
Medicine/Pharmacology - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
30.07.2014
Dissolvable fabric loaded with medicine might offer faster protection against HIV
Dissolvable fabric loaded with medicine might offer faster protection against HIV
University of Washington Posted under: Engineering , Health and Medicine , News Releases , Research , Science Soon, protection from HIV infection could be as simple as inserting a medicated, disappearing fabric minutes before having sex. University of Washington bioengineers have discovered a potentially faster way to deliver a topical drug that protects women from contracting HIV.
Astronomy
30.07.2014
Mars rover sets record after logging more than 25 miles
Mars rover sets record after logging more than 25 miles
NASA's Mars rover Opportunity now holds the off-Earth roving distance record after surpassing 25 miles of driving on the red planet since 2004.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
30.07.2014
AstraZeneca and Roche announce a collaboration to develop a diagnostic test for the treatment of lung cancer
AstraZeneca has announced a partnership with Roche to develop a plasma-based companion diagnostic test to support the development of AZD9291, a clinical stage compound to treat patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are resistant to initial treatment.
Medicine/Pharmacology
30.07.2014
Conference shines spotlight on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) will be in the spotlight at a conference in Brisbane at the weekend.
Life Sciences - Environmental Sciences
30.07.2014
Grants accelerate UQ research for a better world
Affordable housing and low-cost dengue vaccines are among seven University of Queensland research projects recognised in the State Government's latest round of science and innovation grants.
Physics/Materials Science
30.07.2014
Insulator makes electrons move in an ordered way
Insulator makes electrons move in an ordered way
Media Releases Research Using Synchrotron Light Materials Research Matter and Material Novel material shows properties necessary for spintronic devices The motion of electrons is at the heart of most electronic applications. However, in the quest for the next generation of devices, researchers are also interested in manipulating the electrons' spins – their traits that make them into tiny magnets.
Arts and Design
30.07.2014
More to an image than meets the eye
More to an image than meets the eye 30 July 2014 As society becomes increasingly desensitised to the daily deluge of images that are generated through digital technologies, a new exhibition
Astronomy
30.07.2014
Astronomy
30.07.2014
Astronomy - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
29.07.2014
Last ATV lifts off to supply the Space Station
29 July 2014 The fifth and final mission of ESA's Automated Transfer Vehicle got off to a flying start today with its launch from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, heading for the International Space Station.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Civil Engineering/Traffic Engineering
29.07.2014
Urbanisation of rural Africa associated with increased risk of heart disease and diabetes
The increasing urbanisation of rural areas in sub-Saharan Africa could lead to an explosion in incidences of heart disease and diabetes, according to a new study carried out in Uganda which found that
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
29.07.2014
Yale’s Roy Herbst to be featured on Times Square billboard
Look up at a Times Square digital billboard on July 30, and you just might find a Yale cancer researcher looking back.
Environmental Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
29.07.2014
Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean
Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean
University of Washington As the climate warms and sea ice retreats, the North is changing. An ice-covered expanse now has a season of increasingly open water which is predicted to extend across the whole Arctic Ocean before the middle of this century. Storms thus have the potential to create Arctic swell - huge waves that could add a new and unpredictable element to the region.
Astronomy
29.07.2014
Gaia: ’Go’ for science
29 July 2014 Following extensive in-orbit commissioning and several unexpected challenges, ESA's billion-star surveyor, Gaia, is now ready to begin its science mission. The satellite was launched on 19 December 2013, and is orbiting a virtual location in space 1.5 million kilometres from Earth.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
29.07.2014
Health Sciences News Digest 7.29.2014
Health Sciences News Digest 7.29.2014
University of Washington Posted under: Education , For UW Employees , Health and Medicine , Learning , News Roundups , Profiles , Research , Science , Technology , UW and the Community The lat
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
29.07.2014
Team Makes Cancer Glow to Improve Surgical Outcomes
Team Makes Cancer Glow to Improve Surgical Outcomes
The best way to cure most cases of cancer is to surgically remove the tumor. The Achilles heel of this approach, however, is that the surgeon may fail to extract the entire tumor, leading to a local recurrence. With a new technique, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have established a new strategy to help surgeons see the entire tumor in the patient, increasing the likelihood of a positive outcome.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
29.07.2014
Microscopic rowing - without a cox
New research shows that the whip-like appendages on many types of cells are able to synchronise their movements solely through interactions with the fluid that surrounds them. The search for the mechanisms underlying synchronisation can yield insights on many fronts Raymond Goldstein Many different types of cell, including sperm, bacteria and algae, propel themselves using whip-like appendages known as flagella.
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
29.07.2014
Researchers seek 'Holy Grail' in battery design
Researchers seek ’Holy Grail’ in battery design
Pure lithium anode closer to reality with development of protective layer of interconnected carbon domes.
Life Sciences
29.07.2014
Q&A: Stanford's Carla Shatz on fostering interdisciplinary collaboration
Q&A: Stanford’s Carla Shatz on fostering interdisciplinary collaboration
A national report on the value of interdisciplinary approaches in the sciences highlighted Stanford Bio-X as a model for success.
Computer Science/Telecom - Mathematics
29.07.2014
Vision-correcting display makes reading glasses so yesterday
Vision-correcting display makes reading glasses so yesterday
The blurred image on the left shows how a farsighted person would see a computer screen without corrective lenses.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
29.07.2014
"Killer sperm" prevents mating between worm species
The classic definition of a biological species is the ability to breed within its group, and the inability to breed outside it. A study published July 29 in the journal PLOS Biology offers some important clues about the evolution of barriers to breeding. The vast majority of the time, mating across species is merely unsuccessful in producing offspring, though there are exceptions.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
29.07.2014
Diet Affects Men's and Women's Gut Microbes Differently
Diet Affects Men’s and Women’s Gut Microbes Differently
AUSTIN, Texas - The microbes living in the guts of males and females react differently to diet, even when the diets are identical, according to a study by scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and six other institutions published this week . These results suggest that therapies designed to improve human health and treat diseases through nutrition might need to be tailored for each sex.
Astronomy
29.07.2014
Astronomy
29.07.2014
Unique images bring fossil insects back to life
29 Jul 2014 A ground breaking new book that brings together two of the major disciplines behind Jurassic Park is aiming to raise the profile of insect fossils through stunning photographs and unique illustrations.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
29.07.2014
Map of hepatitis C strains should help eradication efforts
Map of hepatitis C strains should help eradication efforts
Researchers have for the first time mapped the global distribution of hepatitis C strains, creating a crucial resource in the fight to eradicate it. An estimated 185 million people are infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide. A significant number of those who become infected will go on to develop liver cirrhosis or liver cancer, and up to 500,000 people die each year from liver diseases related to the virus.
Social Sciences
29.07.2014
“Not enough Undecideds moving towards ‘Yes’ vote”
29 Jul 2014 New data released by the British Election Study (BES) shows that previously undecided Scottish Referendum voters are more likely to say Yes on September 18, but are not enough in numbers to catch up with No voters. The findings come from waves of data collected in March and June by BES and analysed by Professor Ed Fieldhouse from The University of Manchester, who Co-directs the study.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
29.07.2014
Novartis vaccine Bexsero sees high uptake in first large-scale public vaccination program to help protect against devastating meningitis B
Program in Québec's Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region is the first public campaign globally to offer Bexsero to all from 2 months to 20 years of age More than 45,000 infants, young children an
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
29.07.2014
New research to tackle treatment for lung disease
Press release issued: 29 July 2014 Research into improving treatment for patients with one of the UK's most common respiratory diseases has received a £810,000 funding boost. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the name for a collection of diseases which cause breathing difficulties due to long-term damage to the lungs.
Careers/Employment - Law/Forensics
29.07.2014
Tribunal fees have ‘severely limited access to justice’ for workers
Press release issued: 29 July 2014 The introduction of employment tribunal fees a year ago has severely limited access to justice for workers, according to researchers who are calling for the regime to be overhauled.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
29.07.2014
Business/Economics - Environmental Sciences
28.07.2014
Why aren't consumers buying remanufactured products?
Firms looking to increase market share of remanufactured consumer products will have to overcome a big barrier to do so, according to a recent study from the Penn State Smeal College of Business.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
28.07.2014
Scissoring the lipids
Press release issued: 28 July 2014 A new strategy which enables molecules to be disconnected essentially anywhere, even remote from functionality, is described by researchers from the University of Bristol today. The method is now being developed to explore the possibility of creating a tuberculosis (TB) vaccine.
Astronomy - Earth Sciences
28.07.2014
Venus Express: up above the clouds so high
28 July 2014 ESA's Venus Express spacecraft has climbed to a new orbit following its daring aerobraking experiment, and will now resume observations of this fascinating planet for at least a few more months.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
28.07.2014
Three of four California children with mental health needs don’t get treatment
More than 300,000 California children between the ages 4 and 11 need mental health care, but only one in four is treated, according to a new policy brief from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research — this, despite the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommending early-childhood intervention as a critical step in reducing the severity of mental health problems in adulthood.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
28.07.2014
Shutsung Liao, biochemist who studied role of hormones in prostate cancer, 1931-2014
A pioneer in understanding the biochemistry of male hormones and their receptors and how they influenced the development and progression of prostate cancer, Shutsung Liao, PhD'61, professor emeritus
Social Sciences - Study of Religions
28.07.2014
’Next time we will win!’: Gaza’s cycles of violence
In this article - originally published on CRIAViews, the blog of the Cambridge Review of International Affairs - Lucy Thirkell explores some of the reasons behind the tragic and seemingly endless cycle of conflict in Gaza.
Architecture
28.07.2014
3-D printing helps designers build a better brick
3-D printing helps designers build a better brick
Using 3-D printing and advanced geometry, a team at Cornell has developed a new kind of building material - interlocking ceramic bricks that are lightweight, need no mortar and make efficient use of materials.
Business/Economics - Agronomy/Food Science
28.07.2014
Field day offers insight into hops industry
Field day offers insight into hops industry
Brewery owners, farmers and home brewers hoping to hop into New York's burgeoning hops industry gathered at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES) in Geneva, N.Y., July 12 to see its new hop yard and hear advice from experts and peers alike.
Astronomy
28.07.2014
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
28.07.2014
Cruising high seas, engineers detect fake GPS signals
Cruising high seas, engineers detect fake GPS signals
Cruising the Mediterranean aboard a superyacht, a Cornell professor and grad student took their Global Positioning System (GPS) research to the high seas.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
28.07.2014
Rocket Research Confirms X-Ray Glow Emanates from Galactic Hot Bubble
A University of Miami scientist led a NASA rocket mission to measure the diffuse X-ray background in space, revealing a "local hot bubble" and settling a debate. By Marie Guma-Diaz and.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) UM News CORAL GABLES, Fla. (July 28, 2014) — When we look up to the heavens on a clear night, we see an immense dark sky with uncountable stars.
Arts and Design - History/Archeology
28.07.2014
’Textiles of Timor, Island in the Woven Sea’ opens Sept. 7 at the Fowler Museum at UCLA
Awareness of Southeast Asia's textile arts expanded rapidly around the world in the late 20th century.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
28.07.2014
Cagey Material Acts as Alcohol Factory
Cagey Material Acts as Alcohol Factory
Some chemical conversions are harder than others. Refining natural gas into an easy-to-transport, easy-to-store liquid alcohol has so far been a logistic and economic challenge.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
28.07.2014
New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer's, related diseases
New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer’s, related diseases
University of Washington Posted under: Engineering , Health and Medicine , News Releases , Research , Science There is no cure for Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, but the research community is one step closer to finding treatment. University of Washington bioengineers have a designed a peptide structure that can stop the harmful changes of the body's normal proteins into a state that's linked to widespread diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and Lou Gehrig's disease.
Philosophy - Law/Forensics
28.07.2014
Stanford philosopher examines the legitimacy of political power
Stanford philosopher examines the legitimacy of political power
When applying ancient philosophic thought to contemporary issues like surveillance and health care reform, Stanford Humanities Center fellow Amanda Greene finds that claims to political legitimacy lie at the heart of many political debates.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
28.07.2014
Building ’invisible’ materials with light
A new technique which uses light like a needle to thread long chains of particles could help bring sci-fi concepts such as cloaking devices one step closer to reality. This level of control opens up a wide range of potential practical applications Ventsislav Valev A new method of building materials using light, developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge, could one day enable technologies that are often considered the realm of science fiction, such as invisibility cloaks and cloaking devices.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
28.07.2014
Our flocculent neighbour
Title Nearby M33 galaxy blossoming with star birth Released 28/07/2014 10:12 am Copyright ESA/Herschel/PACS/HerM33es Key Programme/C. Kramer/M. Boquien Description The sp
Earth Sciences - Environmental Sciences
28.07.2014
Timing of asteroid final straw that wiped out weakened dinos
Timing of asteroid final straw that wiped out weakened dinos
Dinosaurs might have survived the asteroid strike that wiped them out if it had taken place slightly earlier or later in history.
Medicine/Pharmacology
28.07.2014
Two ears are better than one
Hearing-impaired children fitted with a second cochlear implant (CI) early in life, have significantly better outcomes in aspects of their communication and learning.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
28.07.2014
Alcon’s Simbrinza approved in the EU to treat patients living with glaucoma, a chronic sight-threatening eye disease
Simbrinza provides a convenient option to reduce treatment burden versus concomitant administration of single drugs Simbrinza is the only beta blocker-free formulation combining two approved th
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
28.07.2014
Graphene surfaces on photonic racetracks
28 Jul 2014 Graphene could enable new kind of photonics-based chemical sensors and photo-detectors, University of Manchester researchers have shown.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
28.07.2014
£3m gift for brain disease research
£3m gift for brain disease research
Imperial's research into neurodegenerative conditions has been boosted by a £3 million gift from Lily Safra and the Edmond J. Safra Foundation.
Social Sciences
28.07.2014
Computer Science/Telecom
28.07.2014
Australia’s top 1% continues to take home the same share of the pie
The income for the top 1% of Australian earners has not increased for nearly a decade, according to tax data analysed by the Melbourne Institute at the University of Melbourne.
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
25.07.2014
Only big changes can save Social Security Disability Insurance
In testimony to the United States Senate Committee on Finance July 24, Richard Burkhauser, the Sarah Gibson Blanding Professor of Policy Analysis in the College of Human Ecology at Cornell, said unle
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
25.07.2014
Waters Corporation acquires iKnife technology
Waters Corporation acquires iKnife technology
Waters Corporation has secured a deal to acquire the technology behind the surgical "iKnife" being developed at Imperial College London. Waters, a leading analytical instrument manufacturer, announced that it acquired the technology, called Rapid Evaporative Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (REIMS), from MediMass Ltd, a company created by the iKnife's inventor, Imperial's Professor Zoltan Takats.
Physics/Materials Science - Astronomy
25.07.2014
Timely arrival of Pharao space clock
25 July 2014 ESA has welcomed the arrival of Pharao, an important part of ESA's atomic clock experiment that will be attached to the International Space Station in 2016.
Environmental Sciences - Life Sciences
25.07.2014
Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles
Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles
Invertebrate numbers have decreased by 45% on average over a 35 year period in which the human population doubled, reports a study on the impact of humans on declining animal numbers.  This dec
Administration/Government - Medicine/Pharmacology
25.07.2014
Less than 1% of UK public research funding spent on antibiotic research in past 5 years
Less than 1% of research funding awarded by public and charitable bodies to UK researchers in 2008–13 was awarded for research on antibiotics, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases . The study, which is the first detailed assessment of public and charitable funding to UK researchers focusing on bacteriology and antibiotic research, suggests that present levels of funding for antibiotic research in the UK are inadequate, and will need to be urgently increased if the growing crisis of antibiotic resistance is to be tackled effectively.
Earth Sciences - Astronomy
25.07.2014
Cal Madow
Title Cal Madow mountain range, Somalia Released 25/07/2014 10:00 am Copyright JAXA/ESA Description Northern Somalia's Cal Madow mountain range is pictured in this image from Japan's ALOS satellite.
Earth Sciences - Life Sciences
25.07.2014
A word in your ear, but make it snappy
To most, crocodiles conjure images of sharp teeth, powerful jaws and ferocious, predatory displays – but they are certainly not famous for their hearing abilities. However, this could all change, as new research is shedding light on the reptiles' ears, showcasing their evolution from the reign of the dinosaurs to the era of Crocodile Dundee .
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
25.07.2014
Architecture
25.07.2014
Hot exhibit highlights Queensland architecture
Hot exhibit highlights Queensland architecture
Innovative teaching and research technologies are bringing mid-20 th Century sub-tropical architecture to life at the State Library of Queensland.
Social Sciences - Psychology
25.07.2014
To be socially successful
Romantic, personal and professional relationships are fraught with danger, but a University of Queensland researcher has found the secret to interacting successfully with others in such settings. A study co-authored by Professor Bill von Hippel from UQ's School of Psychology has found it is crucial to recognise when the rules of social engagement shift in order to get along well with others.
History/Archeology
25.07.2014
Earth Sciences
25.07.2014
Dusty Beginnings
UM Rosenstiel scientists studied how fertilization of region could trigger carbonate formation July 25, 2014 MIAMI - A new study suggests that Saharan dust played a major role in the formation of the Bahamas islands. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science showed that iron-rich Saharan dust provides the nutrients necessary for specialized bacteria to produce the island chain's carbonate-based foundation.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
24.07.2014
First ever biological amplifier created by Imperial scientists
First ever biological amplifier created by Imperial scientists
Scientists have made an amplifier to boost biological signals, using DNA and harmless E. coli bacteria. Conventional amplifiers, such as those that are combined with loudspeakers to boost the volume of electric guitars and other instruments, are used to increase the amplitude of electrical signals.
Agronomy/Food Science
24.07.2014
Adults are more apt than kids to clean their plates
If you eat pretty much everything you put on your plate, you're not alone. A new Cornell study shows that the average adult eats 92 percent of what he or she puts on his or her plate.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
24.07.2014
Atomic Structure of Key Muscle Component Revealed in Penn Study
Atomic Structure of Key Muscle Component Revealed in Penn Study
Actin is the most abundant protein in the body, and when you look more closely at its fundamental role in life, it's easy to see why. It is the basis of most movement in the body, and all cells and components within them have the capacity to move: muscle contracting, heart beating, blood clotting, and nerve cells communicating, among many other functions.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
24.07.2014
Link Between Ritual Circumcision Procedure and Herpes Infection in Infants Examined by Penn Medicine Analysis
A rare procedure occasionally performed during Jewish circumcisions that involves direct oral suction is a likely source of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) transmissions documented in infants between 1988 and 2012, a literature review conducted by Penn Medicine researchers and published online in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society found.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
24.07.2014
Incisionless Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Surgery Associated with Shorter Hospital Stays
New research from Penn Medicine shows that incisionless transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery cuts length of hospital stay by 30 percent and has no impact on post-operative vascular complication rates when compared with conventional transfemoral TAVR, which requires an incision in the groin.
Astronomy
24.07.2014
Astronomers create precision map to calculate amount of dark matter in far off galaxy cluster
Astronomers create precision map to calculate amount of dark matter in far off galaxy cluster
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue. Astronomers create precision map to calculate amount of dark matter in far off galaxy cluster Astronomers have produced the most precise map yet of mass within a distant galaxy cluster allowing them to accurately calculate the amount of dark matter within the galaxy system.
Pedagogy/Education Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
24.07.2014
New York communities join to help teen parents
New York communities join to help teen parents
Pregnancy changes lives at any age, but it can be especially burdensome if expectant parents are still in high school, when caring for a child can derail their education and career goals. To improve local resources for expectant and parenting teens and young adults, youth development experts at Cornell's Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research (BCTR) are partnering with community leaders in Buffalo, the Bronx and Rochester on Pathways to Success.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
24.07.2014
8.2% of our DNA is ’functional’
Only 8.2% of human DNA is likely to be doing something important - is 'functional' - say Oxford University researchers.  The figure of 8.2% is very different from one given in 2012, when some scie
Earth Sciences
24.07.2014
Leaf-mining insects destroyed with the dinosaurs, others quickly appeared
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. After the asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous period that triggered the dinosaurs' extinction and ushered in the Paleocene, leaf-mining insects in the western United States completely disappeared. Only a million years later, at Mexican Hat, in southeastern Montana, fossil leaves show diverse leaf-mining traces from new insects that were not present during the Cretaceous, according to paleontologists.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
24.07.2014
University spinout signs licensing deal with major semiconductor foundry
A University of Glasgow spinout company which has developed technology to tackle the increasing challenges of silicon chip development has signed a multimillion dollar deal with a major semiconductor foundry.
Social Sciences - Environmental Sciences
24.07.2014
Global wildlife decline driving slave labor, organized crime
Global wildlife decline driving slave labor, organized crime
Global decline of wildlife populations is driving increases in violent conflicts, organized crime and child labor around the world, according to a new policy paper led by UC Berkeley researchers.
Literature/Linguistics - History/Archeology
24.07.2014
Clark family members make gifts to support library
Descendants of the namesake for UCLA's Clark Library donate family heirlooms purchased at auction of estate of notoriously reclusive relative Meg Sullivan Reed Hutchinson/UCLA Rodney D
Environmental Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
24.07.2014
To power California with wind, water and sun
To power California with wind, water and sun
New research outlines the path to a possible future for California in which renewable energy creates a healthier environment, generates jobs and stabilizes energy prices.
Law/Forensics - Arts and Design
24.07.2014
Works from American art giants enter Stanford's permanent collection
Works from American art giants enter Stanford’s permanent collection
Remarkable works by artists Richard Diebenkorn, Jacob Lawrence and Andy Warhol are entrusted to Stanford's Cantor Arts Center When Connie Wolf took over the helm at the Cantor Arts Center in 2012, she began seeking out opportunities to build on the Cantor's strong collections and its legacy.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
24.07.2014
Recently Identified Molecule Could Lead to New Way to Repair Tendons
Recently Identified Molecule Could Lead to New Way to Repair Tendons
It's an all-too familiar scenario for many people. You sprain your ankle or twist your knee. If you're an adult, the initial pain is followed by a long road of recovery, with no promise that the torn ligament or tendon will ever regain its full strength. That's because tendon and ligament cells in adults produce little collagen, the fibrous protein that is used to build new tendon and ligament tissue.
Medicine/Pharmacology
24.07.2014
Psoriatic arthritis patients need better screening, warns panel of experts
Leading experts have joined together for the first time to call for better screening of psoriatic arthritis to help millions of people suffering from the condition. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) causes painful joint inflammation and can cause irreversible joint damage if left untreated. PsA tends to affect people with the skin condition psoriasis, which causes a red, scaly rash, and affects approximately two per cent of people in the UK.
Event - Social Sciences
24.07.2014
Role of media in sharing life events
A new study finds that people strategically choose how to share their life events. Posting on social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, can intensify emotions - both good and bad.  Photo: Michael Forster Rothbart To share is human.
Environmental Sciences - Earth Sciences
24.07.2014
NASA funds study of changing climate, land use on Chesapeake and Delaware Bays
These maps show the amount of chlorophyll associated with three main phytoplankton groups, averaged over the period 1998-2007. UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Responding to the impact that a growing population and changing land use have had on the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays over the past 60 years is the focus of a research project led by Penn State and supported by a $1.4 million grant from NASA.
Administration/Government
24.07.2014
Transcribe Bentham project reaches 10,000th transcription
Transcribe Bentham project reaches 10,000th transcription
An experiment in 'scholarly crowdsourcing', which engages the public in the online transcription of papers written by the celebrated philosopher and reformer Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832), has published
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
24.07.2014
Seeing the same GP at every visit will reduce emergency department attendance
Press release issued: 24 July 2014 Attendances at emergency departments can be reduced by enabling patients to see the same GP every time they visit their doctor's surgery.
Business/Economics - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
24.07.2014
Wisconsin plastics industry has roots in modest, multitalented UW-Madison professor
Tom Mohs, founder of plastics manufacturing company Placon, holds a plastic container produced in the Madison factory.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
24.07.2014
FDA accepts Sandoz application for biosimilar filgrastim
Sandoz is the first company to announce it has filed for approval of a biologic under the biosimilars pathway created in the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (BPCIA).
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
24.07.2014
Seeing the same GP at every visit will reduce emergency department attendance
24 Jul 2014 Attendances at emergency departments can be reduced by enabling patients to see the same GP every time they visit their doctor's surgery, a new study shows. This is just one of several recommendations made in a report published today by researchers at the Universities of Manchester, Bristol, UCL and Oxford.
Administration/Government
24.07.2014
Australia's ageing population poses budget risks
Australia’s ageing population poses budget risks
Australia's public and private economy-wide deficit could blow out to more than $400 billion by 2050 due to the nation's ageing population, a new Australian National University report has found.
Social Sciences - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
24.07.2014
ARC Future Fellowships recognise research strengths at Sydney
ARC Future Fellowships recognise research strengths at Sydney 24 July 2014 The University of Sydney's strength in science and engineering and the humanities and social sciences has been recognised with the announcement of 13 Australian Research Council Future Fellowships.
Pedagogy/Education Science - History/Archeology
24.07.2014
A decade of dedication to become a doctor
A decade of dedication to become a doctor
Ten years ago, University of Queensland PhD student Penny Bailey had no idea it would take her a decade before she could attach the honorific Dr to her name.
Agronomy/Food Science - Life Sciences
23.07.2014
Boor joins board of food, agriculture research foundation
Kathryn Boor, the Ronald P. Lynch Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and a professor of food science, has been appointed to a five-year term on the inaugural board of director
Astronomy - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
23.07.2014
ATV-5: loaded and locked
23 July 2014 ESA's fifth Automated Transfer Vehicle is now scheduled for launch to the International Space Station at 23:44 GMT on 29 July (01:44 CEST 30 July) on an Ariane 5 rocket from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana.
Life Sciences - Environmental Sciences
23.07.2014
Biologist warns of early stages of Earth’s 6th mass extinction event
Stanford Biology Professor Rodolfo Dirzo and his colleagues warn that this "defaunation" could have harmful downstream effects on human health.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.07.2014
The human parasite Leishmania is a probiotic for the fly that carries it
The human parasite Leishmania is a probiotic for the fly that carries it
The Leishmania parasite, which causes the human disease leishmaniasis, acts as a probiotic in the insect that transmits it to humans, protecting them from bacterial disease.
Astronomy
23.07.2014
Galileo’s ’midwives’ stand ready for launch
23 July 2014 Galileo's post-launch team at ESA have finalised their preparations for taking control of the twin satellites being launched next month.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
23.07.2014
Probing Question: What is whisper therapy?
Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response is a term coined in 2010 to describe "sounds that feel good." The sound of whispering is considered the most common trigger for the ASMR feelings.  Consider the stress of modern life, with its cacophonous soundtrack of traffic, electronics and construction. It's no wonder so much of our leisure time is spent in a quest to let go of the workday and unwind.
Physics/Materials Science - Mathematics
23.07.2014
The physics of lead guitar playing
String bends, tapping, vibrato and whammy bars are all techniques that add to the distinctiveness of a lead guitarist's sound, whether it's Clapton, Hendrix, or BB King.
Business/Economics - Life Sciences
23.07.2014
High school interns bring curiosity, open minds to Stanford labs
High school interns bring curiosity, open minds to Stanford labs
Palo Alto High School student Maya Ben-Efraim focuses on how e-cigarette manufacturers target teens as part of her summer internship with Stanford Research into the Impact of Tobacco Advertising.
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences
23.07.2014
Future Fellows to champion diverse research projects
The University of Queensland has welcomed 16 new Future Fellows as part of a major Australian Research Council funding announcement today.
Computer Science/Telecom
23.07.2014
Carnegie Mellon Will Partner With Duolingo To Evaluate English Language Certification Test
Press Release: Carnegie Mellon Will Partner With Duolingo To Evaluate English Language Certification Test-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University Inexpensive Online Test Could Broaden Access for Prospective Students and Job Applicants : Byron Spice / 412-268-9068 / bspice [a] cs.cmu (p) edu PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University will partner with Duolingo , a CMU spinoff company that provides free online language education, to evaluate the company's new low-cost test for certifying the English skills of college and job applicants.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.07.2014
Grant generates increased access, network training to Dairyland Initiative
The Dean Foods Foundation's grant to The Dairyland Initiative will fund a network of trained consultants to conduct a variety of outreach efforts.
Architecture
23.07.2014
Historical guide 'Shaping Seattle Architecture' returns in second edition
Historical guide ‘Shaping Seattle Architecture’ returns in second edition
University of Washington Jeffrey Karl Ochsner is a University of Washington professor of architecture and associate dean for academic affairs in the College of Built Environments.
Medicine/Pharmacology
23.07.2014
Optimising immunotherapy for autoimmune disease: Dr Sarah Howlett
Dr Howlett and colleagues have been interested for many years in the genetics of the autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes.
Life Sciences
23.07.2014
Dr Lars Dolken
RNA is a family of large molecules found within the body which perform vital roles in how our genes operate.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.07.2014
Policy on the use of animals in research
Research using animals has made, and continues to make, a vital contribution to the understanding, treatment and cure of major human and animal health problems; including cancer, heart disease, polio, diabetes and neurological diseases and disorders. While new methods have enabled scientists and medical researchers to reduce studies involving animals, some work must continue for further fundamental advances to be made.
Environmental Sciences
23.07.2014
Teams up with BBC to launch World War One MOOC
The University of Glasgow is one of four UK Universities that will partner BBC in delivering a series of massive open online courses (MOOCs) on World War One, all of which will be available, for free, on the social learning platform, FutureLearn.com.
Life Sciences
23.07.2014
How does the brain develop? Professor Bill Harris
Over the course of the last 100 years, amphibian and fish embryos have been used to investigate the early development of vertebrates.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.07.2014
How do we make decisions - and why does this process go wrong? Professor Wolfram Schultz
How does the brain make decisions to obtain the most important objects from the environment, or rewards.
Life Sciences
23.07.2014
The role of protein misfolding in neurodegenerative diseases: Dr Roger Barker
There are a number of chronic neurodegenerative conditions of the aging brain that are currently incurable, such as Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease.
Arts and Design - Social Sciences
23.07.2014
University of Sussex appoints new Head of Media, Film and Music
University of Sussex appoints new Head of Media, Film and Music
University of Sussex appoints new Head of Media, Film and Music A founding figure in the development of digital culture and internet studies has been appointed as the new Head of the School of Media, Film and Music (MFM) at the University of Sussex.
History/Archeology - Earth Sciences
23.07.2014
Town meets gown to explore Wisconsin’s Trempealeau mounds
It's all eyes down in late June as UW-Madison students and local volunteers dig and screen for artifacts in the village of Trempealeau.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.07.2014
The role of the immune system in heart attack and stroke: Professor Ziad Mallat
Atherosclerosis is a severe disease of the feeding arteries, responsible for heart attack and stroke.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
23.07.2014
ANU wins funding for Future Fellowships
ANU wins funding for Future Fellowships
The Australian National University will continue to lead the country in academic research after the Australian Research Council (ARC) announced the University has won 16 prized Future Fellowships.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
23.07.2014
Astronomy
22.07.2014
Au!
Title Aausat4 Released 22/07/2014 2:21 pm Copyright Jari Makinen Description The miniature Aausat satellite undergoes repeated temperature variations in a vacuum chamber, cooling the CubeSat to -10°C and heating it to +45°C for more than two weeks.
Astronomy - Social Sciences
22.07.2014
Call Alex: live SocialSpace with Alexander Gerst in orbit
22 July 2014 ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst is sharing beautiful photographs from space on his social media pages.
Arts and Design - Event
22.07.2014
Gray Center to continue bold collaborations between artists, scholars
In its first three years, the Richard and Mary L. Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry has made possible everything from a conference featuring the world's leading cartoonists in dialogue with each
Event - Physics/Materials Science
22.07.2014
Malaysian Airlines Flight MH17: examining the evidence
Nearly a week after the Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 was destroyed over Ukraine, questions abound over what exactly happened. Writer Jelena Damjanovic spoke to professors Tracy Rogers and Doug Perovic about the procedures − and the challenges − of gathering scientific evidence and performing analysis to determine the causes of such tragedies.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.07.2014
£16 million funding announced to create unique medical imaging facility
Related links: Stratified Medicine Scotland Innovation Centre Prof Keith Muir Prof Colin Berry Chancellor George Osborne has today (22 July) announced a £16m funding package to build a state-of-the-art Imaging Centre for Excellence (ICE) at the University of Glasgow.
Law/Forensics
22.07.2014
Comment: What will MH17’s black boxes reveal?
" The data inside should give a strong indication about what happened to the aircraft but the question now is whether that data has been tampered with.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
22.07.2014
The need for speed
As described in the Summer 2014 issue of Topics , Harvard researchers are pushing the limits of computing power to achieve new breakthroughs in science and engineering. What will high-performance computing mean for you? Sustainable energy To select the best chemicals for use in a flow battery, the researchers relied on high-performance computing power.
Computer Science/Telecom - Mathematics
22.07.2014
Built for speed: Designing exascale computers
"Imagine a heart surgeon operating to repair a blocked coronary artery. Someday soon, the surgeon might run a detailed computer simulation of blood flowing through the patient's arteries, showing how millions of red blood cells jostle and tumble through the small vessels.
Social Sciences
22.07.2014
Blacks lose homes more today than in '90s
New forms of racial inequality make homeownership a risky investment for African-Americans, according to a new study by Cornell and Rice University sociologists.
Social Sciences - Administration/Government
22.07.2014
Majority of Texas Voters Want Tighter Immigration Laws, UT/Texas Tribune Poll Shows
AUSTIN, Texas — The current migrant crisis on the Texas border comes weeks after the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll found that many Texans believe immigration and border security are the two most important problems facing the state. The statewide poll, conduced in late May and early June before the situation on the border drew national attention, featured a battery of questions about Texans' attitudes on border security and immigration.
Physics/Materials Science - Astronomy
22.07.2014
Birthday bash to celebrate laser inventor Charles Townes' 99th
Birthday bash to celebrate laser inventor Charles Townes’ 99th
Laser inventor Charles Hard Townes, professor emeritus of physics at the University of California, Berkeley, turns 99 on July 28, and an adoring campus is throwing him a long-overdue birthday party.
22.07.2014
UChicago to test cAlert emergency system on July 24
UChicago officials will conduct a routine test of cAlert, its emergency notification system, about 10 a.m. on Thursday, July 24.
Environmental Sciences - Earth Sciences
22.07.2014
North Atlantic right whale's prospects tied to climate
North Atlantic right whale's prospects tied to climate
A pleasant scientific surprise: The North Atlantic right whale population - once projected for extinction - exhibited an unexpected increase in calf production and population size during the past decade.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.07.2014
Researchers answer 'provocative question' on breast cancer
A Cornell proposal to study obesity as a risk factor for breast cancer has received support from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health. Claudia Fischbach-Teschl, associate professor of biomedical engineering, and colleagues at Cornell and Weill Cornell Medical College have received a $1.34 million grant to study whether obesity, a known risk factor for breast cancer, changes breast tissue in a manner similar to tumors, thereby permitting the disease to develop.
History/Archeology
22.07.2014
Carnegie Mellon’s Scott Sandage Helps "Modern Family’s" Jesse Tyler Ferguson Learn His Family History on "Who Do You Think You Are?"
Press Release: Carnegie Mellon's Scott Sandage Helps "Modern Family's" Jesse Tyler Ferguson Learn His Family History on "Who Do You Think You Are?"-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Administration/Government
22.07.2014
Fly's Super-Hearing Power Could Aid Humans
Fly’s Super-Hearing Power Could Aid Humans
AUSTIN, Texas — A team of researchers at the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin has developed a tiny, low-power device that mimics a fly's hearing mechanism.
History/Archeology - Architecture
22.07.2014
'Pompeii of the north' revealed by archaeologists
‘Pompeii of the north’ revealed by archaeologists
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue. 'Pompeii of the north' revealed by archaeologists Excavations at a Roman site in County Durham have revealed the 'Pompeii of the north', say archaeologists.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
22.07.2014
Making Chocolate Sustainable
Huck scientists find that spraying the leaves of Theobroma cacao trees with a non-toxic solution enhances natural disease resistence. Cocoa farmers this year will lose an estimated 30-40% of their crop to pests and disease, and with chocolate prices having risen globally by roughly two-thirds in the past decade, concern is growing about sustainability in cocoa production, particularly the environmental impact and human health risks of toxic agrichemicals - organochloride insecticides and heavy-metal-based fungicides - used in cocoa production to fight pests and disease.
Life Sciences
22.07.2014
Bright spark lights up Brain Bee
Bright spark lights up Brain Bee
Queensland's “brainiest student” has been announced, with 14-year-old Sophie Watson out-smarting 170 other high school students to become the 2014 Queensland Brain Bee Champion at The University of Queensland today.
Life Sciences
22.07.2014
Wildlife hospitals save 16,000 animals in four years
Wildlife hospitals save 16,000 animals in four years
Birds are the most commonly rescued wildlife in Queensland, with the laughing kookaburra among our hardiest species, according to new research from The University of Queensland's Gatton Campus.
Business/Economics
22.07.2014
Research hub to boost dairy product innovation
Research hub to boost dairy product innovation
Longer-lasting Australian dairy products with high nutritional value will soon be available in Australia and overseas, thanks to a major industrial research initiative.
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
22.07.2014
Innovations set to improve dairy products
Longer-lasting Australian dairy products with high nutritional value will soon be available to consumers in Australia and overseas thanks to a major industrial research initiative.
Earth Sciences - Environmental Sciences
22.07.2014
Commercial Fishing’s Impact on Sharks
UM Rosenstiel School and Abess Center-led study provides new information for shark conservation efforts July 22, 2014 MIAMI -A new study that examined the survival rates of 12 different shark species when captured as unintentional bycatch in commercial longline fishing operations found large differences in survival rates across the 12 species, with bigeye thresher, dusky, and scalloped hammerhead being the most vulnerable.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
21.07.2014
Toyota Gift Will Support Penn Research on Automotive Electronic and Computer Systems
Toyota Gift Will Support Penn Research on Automotive Electronic and Computer Systems
The University of Pennsylvania's PRECISE Center has received $120,000 from the Toyota InfoTechnology Center.
Astronomy
21.07.2014
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.07.2014
Some aggressive tumors silence genes that fight cancer
A study led by Yale Cancer Center may provide clues to how some aggressive cancers turn off, or silence, genes critical to suppressing tumors.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.07.2014
Metabolic Enzyme Stops Progression of Most Common Type of Kidney Cancer
Metabolic Enzyme Stops Progression of Most Common Type of Kidney Cancer
In an analysis of small molecules called metabolites used by the body to make fuel in normal and cancerous cells in human kidney tissue, a research team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania identified an enzyme key to applying the brakes on tumor growth.
History/Archeology
21.07.2014
Comment: Don’t stop toddlers running around museums – it could help them learn
" My observations indicate a different kind of learning is going on for these young children. Rather than learning facts about the exhibits in the museum, they were learning with their bodies.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering
21.07.2014
Migrating wildebeests, raging hippos, and robotic boats on Kenya's Mara River
Above: Amanda Subalusky and Chris Dutton of the Yale Mara Project describe their research on the impact of wildebeests and hippos on rivers within Kenya's renowned Maasai Mara National Reserve.
Study of Religions
21.07.2014
Comment: Hollywood’s slew of biblical films is no return from Exodus
" Wherever you look you can find the Bible lurking. What is new in the latest offerings from Hollywood is how it's packaging the Bible – but then the Bible is constantly repackaged and retold for new audiences.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
21.07.2014
World-leading biophysicist to head Biological Sciences at Leeds
Professor John Ladbury has been appointed Dean of the Faculty of Biological Sciences at the University of Leeds.
Astronomy
21.07.2014
Messy peaks of Zucchius
Title The messy peaks of Zucchius Released 21/07/2014 10:29 am Copyright ESA/SMART-1/AMIE camera team/ Space Exploration Institute Description Even to the naked eye, our Moon looks heavily cratered.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Astronomy
21.07.2014
Stem cells aid muscle repair and strengthening after resistance exercise
University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Marni Boppart studies the mechanisms that enable muscles to recover and grow stronger after exercise. CHAMPAIGN, Ill. A new study in mice reveals that mesenchymal (mezz-EN-chem-uhl) stem cells (MSCs) help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
21.07.2014
Yimon Aye is a Beckman Young Investigator
Yimon Aye, assistant professor of chemistry and chemical biology, has received a Beckman Young Investigator award from the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation.
Life Sciences - Earth Sciences
21.07.2014
Research in the news: A 520 million-year-old food plan
Research in the news: A 520 million-year-old food plan
Anyone who's read a children's menu at a restaurant knows that kids and adults tend to like different foods.
Chemistry - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
21.07.2014
£1.8 million investment boosts cutting-edge molecular science at Imperial
£1.8 million investment boosts cutting-edge molecular science at Imperial
London and Westminster MP Mark Field visits Imperial today to launch a £1.8 million upgrade to the Department of Chemistry's analytical facilities. The department has upgraded its NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) Spectrometer , X-ray Diffractometer and Mass Spectrometer machines, which use highly sophisticated and powerful technology to conduct core chemistry experiments.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
21.07.2014
Study to trial intense exercise to aid mental health
Study to trial intense exercise to aid mental health
Can high-intensity exercise improve the physical and emotional health of people with mental illness? University of Queensland researchers are seeking volunteers to help find out. Researchers from the Centre for Research on Exercise, Physical Activity and Health at UQ's School of Human Movement Studies hope to improve the wellbeing of people with mental illness by comparing high-intensity to moderate-intensity exercise.
Medicine/Pharmacology
21.07.2014
Partners of miscarriage sufferers 'ignored'
Partners of miscarriage sufferers ’ignored’
The partners of women who miscarry often feel invisible, ignored and sidelined during and after miscarriage - and unable to talk about their own feelings of loss and pain - according to new findings from UCL and the Miscarriage Association.
Event - Environmental Sciences
21.07.2014
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Physics/Materials Science
21.07.2014
New material puts a twist in light
New material puts a twist in light
A team from the Research School of Physics and Engineering have uncovered the secret to twisting light at will. It is the latest step in the development of photonics, the faster, more compact and less carbon-hungry successor to electronics. A random find in the washing basket led the team to create the latest in a new breed of materials known as metamaterials.
Life Sciences - Event
21.07.2014
Royal recognition for UQ researcher
Royal recognition for UQ researcher
Studies involving some of the world's smallest creatures have resulted in one of the world's biggest honours for University of Queensland researcher Professor Mandyam Srinivasan.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
20.07.2014
New method for extracting radioactive elements from air and water
New method for extracting radioactive elements from air and water
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have successfully tested a material that can extract atoms of rare or dangerous elements such as radon from the air. Gases such as radon, xenon and krypton all occur naturally in the air but in minute quantities - typically less than one part per million.  As a result they are expensive to extract for use in industries such as lighting or medicine and, in the case of radon, the gas can accumulate in buildings.  In the US alone, radon accounts for around 21,000 lung cancer deaths a year.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
20.07.2014
Tiny laser sensor heightens bomb detection sensitivity
New technology under development at UC Berkeley could soon give bomb-sniffing dogs some serious competition. A team of researchers led by Xiang Zhang, UC Berkeley professor of mechanical engineering, has found a way to dramatically increase the sensitivity of a light-based plasmon sensor to detect incredibly minute concentrations of explosives.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.07.2014
Using ’Big Data’ approach to map relationships between human and animal diseases
This image describes the number and types of pathogens found in EU countries.
Physics/Materials Science
18.07.2014
Tracking the breakup of Arctic summer sea ice
As sea ice begins to melt back toward its late September minimum, it is being watched as never before.