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Life Sciences - Sport Sciences
20.07.2015
Football helmet tests may not account for concussion-prone actions
Football helmet tests may not account for concussion-prone actions
Mounting evidence suggests that concussions in football are caused by the sudden rotation of the skull. David Camarillo's lab at Stanford has evidence that suggests current football helmet tests don't account for these movements. When modern football helmets were introduced, they all but eliminated traumatic skull fractures caused by blunt force impacts.
Sport Sciences - Business/Economics
14.01.2015
Rise of billion pound replica kit industry has changed the design of football shirts, study finds
Although new kits have become more frequent, designs have become more governed by tradition over last two decades Adult market for replica football shirts as leisurewear only developed significantly from the late 1980s and early 1990s Rise due to wider social fashion trends, the phenomenon of 'kidulthood', a generation of fans who had grown up wearing child replica shirts, and the commercialisation of football as the Premier League era beg
Sport Sciences
15.12.2014
Home umpires favour their own teams in Test matches, study finds
Economists discover the introduction of neutral umpires in Test cricket led to a drop in Leg Before Wicket (LBW) decisions going in favour of home teams Findings published amid debate over whether neutral umpiring is still required following introduction of Decision Review System The introduction of neutral umpires in Test cricket led to a drop in the number of Leg Before Wicket (LBW) decisions going in favour of home teams, a study has revealed.
Sport Sciences
28.11.2014
Home umpires favour their own teams in Test matches
The introduction of neutral umpires in Test cricket led to a drop in the number of LBW decisions going in favour of home teams, a study has revealed. The findings from research by economists, published by the Journal of the Royal Statistical Society , come amidst renewed debate on whether neutral umpiring is still required in Test matches following the introduction of the Decision Review System (DRS).
Sport Sciences - Administration/Government
27.11.2014
Research examines relationship between domestic abuse and football
A report, published today by the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR), highlights a correlation between the occurrence of certain football matches and increased reports of domestic abuse. The report, which was commissioned by the Scottish Government and carried out by academics at the University of Glasgow and Glasgow Caledonian University, found an increase in recorded domestic violence incidents on the day that football matches were played.
Sport Sciences - Business/Economics
10.03.2014
Footy clubs can't buy success (yet), study finds
Professor Borland 03 8344 5294 or via Ryan Sheales (media office) 0402 351 412 The study - AFL team performance and football expenditure - looked at the football department spending and on-field success of AFL clubs between 1994 and 2011. It found that, over recent years, clubs that spent 10 percent above average on their football departments enjoyed a 9.5 percent increase in their winning ratio during the home-and-away season.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Sport Sciences
27.02.2014
Scottish study to advance rugby player welfare
Scottish study to advance rugby player welfare
Scottish Rugby is seeking the assistance of former international players with a ground-breaking medical project that could benefit future generations. Working alongside world-renowned experts in the field of head injuries, Scottish Rugby is asking Scotland players of the past to take part in a study on the effects of concussion.
Sport Sciences
12.02.2014
Game-winning 'momentum' illusion is but a delusion
Game-winning 'momentum' illusion is but a delusion
A hot hand may be hokum: Cornell researchers have examined the concept of "winning momentum" with varsity college hockey teams, and they conclude that momentum advantages don't exist, says a new study in the journal Economics Letters. "Whether it's sports commentators or stock analysts who are talking, momentum is routinely assumed to be important on a day-to-day basis," said Kevin M. Kniffin, a postdoctoral research associate at Cornell's Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management.
Sport Sciences
24.01.2014
How strong of a football fan are you? There’s a test for that
University of Washington So, you think you're a loyal supporter of a certain football team? Would you care to put that to a scientific test? University of Washington psychologist Anthony Greenwald has developed a new version of his Implicit Association Test to measure the strength of one's support for one of several football teams.
Life Sciences - Sport Sciences
17.10.2013
Brain scans show unusual activity in retired American football players
Brain scans show unusual activity in retired American football players
A new study has discovered profound abnormalities in brain activity in a group of retired American football players. Although the former players in the study were not diagnosed with any neurological condition, brain imaging tests revealed unusual activity that correlated with how many times they had left the field with a head injury during their careers.
Sport Sciences
09.10.2013
Putting the boot in! Sports scientists look into antisocial behaviour on and off the pitch
Athletes participating in a team sport like football, rugby, or hockey, who behave in an anti-social way on the pitch, are also antisocial in their interactions with other students at university, according to research published by University of Birmingham sports scientists in the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology .
Sport Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.06.2013
Research leads to enhanced CFL concussion guidelines
Research leads to enhanced CFL concussion guidelines
Study tests how much CFL players and their university-level counterparts know about concussions-and how to deal with them. Research from the University of Alberta shows Canadian Football League players are more likely than university-level players to value medical tests after concussions. But the professional athletes are more apt to incorrectly believe it's OK to return to the sport within 24 to 48 hours if they have no symptoms.
Careers/Employment - Sport Sciences
28.02.2013
A sporting chance for those less likely to be considered
A sporting chance for those less likely to be considered
If you are born earlier in the sporting year there is a good chance the elite sports selection process will be biased in your favour. According to a study published today in the online science journal PLOS ONE , National Hockey League (NHL) draftees born between July and December were on average much more likely to go on to have successful top level playing careers and compared to those born in the first three months of the sporting year who were initially more favoured by the sports' system.
Sport Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
24.10.2012
Researchers measure impact of football concussions
Stanford Report, October 24, 2012 Preventing concussions in football requires first knowing what types of hits cause them. Stanford scientists have developed technologies that will help unlock that mystery. Concussions are arguably football's most prominent injury, but they're also its most mysterious.
Life Sciences - Sport Sciences
09.10.2012
Could neuroscience help future football stars reach their full potential?
Could neuroscience help future football stars reach their full potential?
Creating the next generation of football stars may be down to understanding the teenage brain, according to new research from the University of Bristol.
Sport Sciences
05.04.2012
Psychological testing may predict success in football
Measuring what are known as 'executive functions', which reflect the cognitive ability to deal with sudden problems, may make it possible to predict how good an elite football player will become in the future. This has been shown by a new study from Karolinska Institutet. Scientists believe for the first time that they have found the scientific key to what has previously been described as 'game intelligence' in successful football players.
Sport Sciences - Business/Economics
15.03.2012
March Madness: Can Losing Lead to Winning?
March Madness: Can Losing Lead to Winning?
Is your March Madness bracket filled out yet? Imagine you're watching a close game. As the teams head to the locker room at half time, only two points separate the two competitors. Which team do you think is more likely to win? The team down by one or the team up by one? If you're like most people, you said up by one.
Business/Economics - Sport Sciences
03.02.2012
Media portrayal of race in sports reveals biases in corporate world
Media portrayal of race in sports reveals biases in corporate world
University Park, Pa. The U.S. may have its first black president and the Fortune 500 its first black female chief executive, but African American CEOs account for a mere one percent of the chiefs of those 500 largest companies.
Sport Sciences - Life Sciences
01.02.2012
Swimming goes high tech
Swimming goes high tech
Scientists have developed inertial systems, worn in a full-body swimming suit, which can analyse the strengths and weaknesses of elite-level swimmers during workout sessions. It's a revolutionary new tool for coaches. Will scientists play a role in creating the next Michael Phelps or Laure Manaudou? Researchers from EPFL and University of Lausanne have at least taken the first step, by developing a tool that can help improve elite swimmers' workouts.
Physics/Materials Science - Sport Sciences
06.07.2011
The universe may have been born spinning, according to new findings on the symmetry of the cosmos
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Physicists and astronomers have long believed that the universe has mirror symmetry, like a basketball. But recent findings from the University of Michigan suggest that the shape of the Big Bang might be more complicated than previously thought, and that the early universe spun on an axis.
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