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# "Science Wire" gives access to latest science news from research centers and R&D companies.
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Social Sciences - Psychology
25.07.2014
To be socially successful
Romantic, personal and professional relationships are fraught with danger, but a University of Queensland researcher has found the secret to interacting successfully with others in such settings. A study co-authored by Professor Bill von Hippel from UQ's School of Psychology has found it is crucial to recognise when the rules of social engagement shift in order to get along well with others.
History/Archeology
25.07.2014
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
24.07.2014
First ever biological amplifier created by Imperial scientists
First ever biological amplifier created by Imperial scientists
Scientists have made an amplifier to boost biological signals, using DNA and harmless E. coli bacteria. Conventional amplifiers, such as those that are combined with loudspeakers to boost the volume of electric guitars and other instruments, are used to increase the amplitude of electrical signals.
Agronomy/Food Science
24.07.2014
Adults are more apt than kids to clean their plates
If you eat pretty much everything you put on your plate, you're not alone. A new Cornell study shows that the average adult eats 92 percent of what he or she puts on his or her plate.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
24.07.2014
Atomic Structure of Key Muscle Component Revealed in Penn Study
Atomic Structure of Key Muscle Component Revealed in Penn Study
Actin is the most abundant protein in the body, and when you look more closely at its fundamental role in life, it's easy to see why. It is the basis of most movement in the body, and all cells and components within them have the capacity to move: muscle contracting, heart beating, blood clotting, and nerve cells communicating, among many other functions.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
24.07.2014
Link Between Ritual Circumcision Procedure and Herpes Infection in Infants Examined by Penn Medicine Analysis
A rare procedure occasionally performed during Jewish circumcisions that involves direct oral suction is a likely source of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) transmissions documented in infants between 1988 and 2012, a literature review conducted by Penn Medicine researchers and published online in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society found.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
24.07.2014
Incisionless Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Surgery Associated with Shorter Hospital Stays
New research from Penn Medicine shows that incisionless transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery cuts length of hospital stay by 30 percent and has no impact on post-operative vascular complication rates when compared with conventional transfemoral TAVR, which requires an incision in the groin.
Astronomy
24.07.2014
Astronomers create precision map to calculate amount of dark matter in far off galaxy cluster
Astronomers create precision map to calculate amount of dark matter in far off galaxy cluster
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue. Astronomers create precision map to calculate amount of dark matter in far off galaxy cluster Astronomers have produced the most precise map yet of mass within a distant galaxy cluster allowing them to accurately calculate the amount of dark matter within the galaxy system.
Pedagogy/Education Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
24.07.2014
New York communities join to help teen parents
New York communities join to help teen parents
Pregnancy changes lives at any age, but it can be especially burdensome if expectant parents are still in high school, when caring for a child can derail their education and career goals. To improve local resources for expectant and parenting teens and young adults, youth development experts at Cornell's Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research (BCTR) are partnering with community leaders in Buffalo, the Bronx and Rochester on Pathways to Success.
Earth Sciences
24.07.2014
Leaf-mining insects destroyed with the dinosaurs, others quickly appeared
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. After the asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous period that triggered the dinosaurs' extinction and ushered in the Paleocene, leaf-mining insects in the western United States completely disappeared. Only a million years later, at Mexican Hat, in southeastern Montana, fossil leaves show diverse leaf-mining traces from new insects that were not present during the Cretaceous, according to paleontologists.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
24.07.2014
University spinout signs licensing deal with major semiconductor foundry
A University of Glasgow spinout company which has developed technology to tackle the increasing challenges of silicon chip development has signed a multimillion dollar deal with a major semiconductor foundry.
Social Sciences - Environmental Sciences
24.07.2014
Global wildlife decline driving slave labor, organized crime
Global wildlife decline driving slave labor, organized crime
Global decline of wildlife populations is driving increases in violent conflicts, organized crime and child labor around the world, according to a new policy paper led by UC Berkeley researchers.
Literature/Linguistics - History/Archeology
24.07.2014
Clark family members make gifts to support library
Descendants of the namesake for UCLA's Clark Library donate family heirlooms purchased at auction of estate of notoriously reclusive relative Meg Sullivan Reed Hutchinson/UCLA Rodney D
Environmental Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
24.07.2014
To power California with wind, water and sun
To power California with wind, water and sun
New research outlines the path to a possible future for California in which renewable energy creates a healthier environment, generates jobs and stabilizes energy prices.
Law/Forensics - Arts and Design
24.07.2014
Works from American art giants enter Stanford's permanent collection
Works from American art giants enter Stanford’s permanent collection
Remarkable works by artists Richard Diebenkorn, Jacob Lawrence and Andy Warhol are entrusted to Stanford's Cantor Arts Center When Connie Wolf took over the helm at the Cantor Arts Center in 2012, she began seeking out opportunities to build on the Cantor's strong collections and its legacy.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
24.07.2014
Recently Identified Molecule Could Lead to New Way to Repair Tendons
Recently Identified Molecule Could Lead to New Way to Repair Tendons
It's an all-too familiar scenario for many people. You sprain your ankle or twist your knee. If you're an adult, the initial pain is followed by a long road of recovery, with no promise that the torn ligament or tendon will ever regain its full strength. That's because tendon and ligament cells in adults produce little collagen, the fibrous protein that is used to build new tendon and ligament tissue.
Medicine/Pharmacology
24.07.2014
Psoriatic arthritis patients need better screening, warns panel of experts
Leading experts have joined together for the first time to call for better screening of psoriatic arthritis to help millions of people suffering from the condition. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) causes painful joint inflammation and can cause irreversible joint damage if left untreated. PsA tends to affect people with the skin condition psoriasis, which causes a red, scaly rash, and affects approximately two per cent of people in the UK.
Event - Social Sciences
24.07.2014
Role of media in sharing life events
A new study finds that people strategically choose how to share their life events. Posting on social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, can intensify emotions - both good and bad.  Photo: Michael Forster Rothbart To share is human.
Environmental Sciences - Earth Sciences
24.07.2014
NASA funds study of changing climate, land use on Chesapeake and Delaware Bays
These maps show the amount of chlorophyll associated with three main phytoplankton groups, averaged over the period 1998-2007. UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Responding to the impact that a growing population and changing land use have had on the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays over the past 60 years is the focus of a research project led by Penn State and supported by a $1.4 million grant from NASA.
Administration/Government
24.07.2014
Transcribe Bentham project reaches 10,000th transcription
Transcribe Bentham project reaches 10,000th transcription
An experiment in 'scholarly crowdsourcing', which engages the public in the online transcription of papers written by the celebrated philosopher and reformer Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832), has published
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
24.07.2014
Seeing the same GP at every visit will reduce emergency department attendance
Press release issued: 24 July 2014 Attendances at emergency departments can be reduced by enabling patients to see the same GP every time they visit their doctor's surgery.
Business/Economics - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
24.07.2014
Wisconsin plastics industry has roots in modest, multitalented UW-Madison professor
Tom Mohs, founder of plastics manufacturing company Placon, holds a plastic container produced in the Madison factory.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
24.07.2014
FDA accepts Sandoz application for biosimilar filgrastim
Sandoz is the first company to announce it has filed for approval of a biologic under the biosimilars pathway created in the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (BPCIA).
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
24.07.2014
Seeing the same GP at every visit will reduce emergency department attendance
24 Jul 2014 Attendances at emergency departments can be reduced by enabling patients to see the same GP every time they visit their doctor's surgery, a new study shows. This is just one of several recommendations made in a report published today by researchers at the Universities of Manchester, Bristol, UCL and Oxford.
Administration/Government
24.07.2014
Australia's ageing population poses budget risks
Australia’s ageing population poses budget risks
Australia's public and private economy-wide deficit could blow out to more than $400 billion by 2050 due to the nation's ageing population, a new Australian National University report has found.
Social Sciences - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
24.07.2014
ARC Future Fellowships recognise research strengths at Sydney
ARC Future Fellowships recognise research strengths at Sydney 24 July 2014 The University of Sydney's strength in science and engineering and the humanities and social sciences has been recognised with the announcement of 13 Australian Research Council Future Fellowships.
Pedagogy/Education Science - History/Archeology
24.07.2014
A decade of dedication to become a doctor
A decade of dedication to become a doctor
Ten years ago, University of Queensland PhD student Penny Bailey had no idea it would take her a decade before she could attach the honorific Dr to her name.
Agronomy/Food Science - Life Sciences
23.07.2014
Boor joins board of food, agriculture research foundation
Kathryn Boor, the Ronald P. Lynch Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and a professor of food science, has been appointed to a five-year term on the inaugural board of director
Astronomy - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
23.07.2014
ATV-5: loaded and locked
23 July 2014 ESA's fifth Automated Transfer Vehicle is now scheduled for launch to the International Space Station at 23:44 GMT on 29 July (01:44 CEST 30 July) on an Ariane 5 rocket from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.07.2014
The human parasite Leishmania is a probiotic for the fly that carries it
The human parasite Leishmania is a probiotic for the fly that carries it
The Leishmania parasite, which causes the human disease leishmaniasis, acts as a probiotic in the insect that transmits it to humans, protecting them from bacterial disease.
Astronomy
23.07.2014
Galileo’s ’midwives’ stand ready for launch
23 July 2014 Galileo's post-launch team at ESA have finalised their preparations for taking control of the twin satellites being launched next month.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
23.07.2014
Probing Question: What is whisper therapy?
Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response is a term coined in 2010 to describe "sounds that feel good." The sound of whispering is considered the most common trigger for the ASMR feelings.  Consider the stress of modern life, with its cacophonous soundtrack of traffic, electronics and construction. It's no wonder so much of our leisure time is spent in a quest to let go of the workday and unwind.
Physics/Materials Science - Mathematics
23.07.2014
The physics of lead guitar playing
String bends, tapping, vibrato and whammy bars are all techniques that add to the distinctiveness of a lead guitarist's sound, whether it's Clapton, Hendrix, or BB King.
Business/Economics - Life Sciences
23.07.2014
High school interns bring curiosity, open minds to Stanford labs
High school interns bring curiosity, open minds to Stanford labs
Palo Alto High School student Maya Ben-Efraim focuses on how e-cigarette manufacturers target teens as part of her summer internship with Stanford Research into the Impact of Tobacco Advertising.
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences
23.07.2014
Future Fellows to champion diverse research projects
The University of Queensland has welcomed 16 new Future Fellows as part of a major Australian Research Council funding announcement today.
Computer Science/Telecom
23.07.2014
Carnegie Mellon Will Partner With Duolingo To Evaluate English Language Certification Test
Press Release: Carnegie Mellon Will Partner With Duolingo To Evaluate English Language Certification Test-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University Inexpensive Online Test Could Broaden Access for Prospective Students and Job Applicants : Byron Spice / 412-268-9068 / bspice [a] cs.cmu (p) edu PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University will partner with Duolingo , a CMU spinoff company that provides free online language education, to evaluate the company's new low-cost test for certifying the English skills of college and job applicants.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.07.2014
Grant generates increased access, network training to Dairyland Initiative
The Dean Foods Foundation's grant to The Dairyland Initiative will fund a network of trained consultants to conduct a variety of outreach efforts.
Architecture
23.07.2014
Historical guide 'Shaping Seattle Architecture' returns in second edition
Historical guide ‘Shaping Seattle Architecture’ returns in second edition
University of Washington Jeffrey Karl Ochsner is a University of Washington professor of architecture and associate dean for academic affairs in the College of Built Environments.
Medicine/Pharmacology
23.07.2014
Optimising immunotherapy for autoimmune disease: Dr Sarah Howlett
Dr Howlett and colleagues have been interested for many years in the genetics of the autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes.
Life Sciences
23.07.2014
Dr Lars Dolken
RNA is a family of large molecules found within the body which perform vital roles in how our genes operate.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.07.2014
Policy on the use of animals in research
Research using animals has made, and continues to make, a vital contribution to the understanding, treatment and cure of major human and animal health problems; including cancer, heart disease, polio, diabetes and neurological diseases and disorders. While new methods have enabled scientists and medical researchers to reduce studies involving animals, some work must continue for further fundamental advances to be made.
Environmental Sciences
23.07.2014
Teams up with BBC to launch World War One MOOC
The University of Glasgow is one of four UK Universities that will partner BBC in delivering a series of massive open online courses (MOOCs) on World War One, all of which will be available, for free, on the social learning platform, FutureLearn.com.
Life Sciences
23.07.2014
How does the brain develop? Professor Bill Harris
Over the course of the last 100 years, amphibian and fish embryos have been used to investigate the early development of vertebrates.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.07.2014
How do we make decisions - and why does this process go wrong? Professor Wolfram Schultz
How does the brain make decisions to obtain the most important objects from the environment, or rewards.
Life Sciences
23.07.2014
The role of protein misfolding in neurodegenerative diseases: Dr Roger Barker
There are a number of chronic neurodegenerative conditions of the aging brain that are currently incurable, such as Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease.
Arts and Design - Social Sciences
23.07.2014
University of Sussex appoints new Head of Media, Film and Music
University of Sussex appoints new Head of Media, Film and Music
University of Sussex appoints new Head of Media, Film and Music A founding figure in the development of digital culture and internet studies has been appointed as the new Head of the School of Media, Film and Music (MFM) at the University of Sussex.
History/Archeology - Earth Sciences
23.07.2014
Town meets gown to explore Wisconsin’s Trempealeau mounds
It's all eyes down in late June as UW-Madison students and local volunteers dig and screen for artifacts in the village of Trempealeau.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.07.2014
The role of the immune system in heart attack and stroke: Professor Ziad Mallat
Atherosclerosis is a severe disease of the feeding arteries, responsible for heart attack and stroke.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
23.07.2014
ANU wins funding for Future Fellowships
ANU wins funding for Future Fellowships
The Australian National University will continue to lead the country in academic research after the Australian Research Council (ARC) announced the University has won 16 prized Future Fellowships.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
23.07.2014
Astronomy
22.07.2014
Au!
Title Aausat4 Released 22/07/2014 2:21 pm Copyright Jari Makinen Description The miniature Aausat satellite undergoes repeated temperature variations in a vacuum chamber, cooling the CubeSat to -10°C and heating it to +45°C for more than two weeks.
Astronomy - Social Sciences
22.07.2014
Call Alex: live SocialSpace with Alexander Gerst in orbit
22 July 2014 ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst is sharing beautiful photographs from space on his social media pages.
Arts and Design - Event
22.07.2014
Gray Center to continue bold collaborations between artists, scholars
In its first three years, the Richard and Mary L. Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry has made possible everything from a conference featuring the world's leading cartoonists in dialogue with each
Event - Physics/Materials Science
22.07.2014
Malaysian Airlines Flight MH17: examining the evidence
Nearly a week after the Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 was destroyed over Ukraine, questions abound over what exactly happened. Writer Jelena Damjanovic spoke to professors Tracy Rogers and Doug Perovic about the procedures − and the challenges − of gathering scientific evidence and performing analysis to determine the causes of such tragedies.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.07.2014
£16 million funding announced to create unique medical imaging facility
Related links: Stratified Medicine Scotland Innovation Centre Prof Keith Muir Prof Colin Berry Chancellor George Osborne has today (22 July) announced a £16m funding package to build a state-of-the-art Imaging Centre for Excellence (ICE) at the University of Glasgow.
Law/Forensics
22.07.2014
Comment: What will MH17’s black boxes reveal?
" The data inside should give a strong indication about what happened to the aircraft but the question now is whether that data has been tampered with.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
22.07.2014
The need for speed
As described in the Summer 2014 issue of Topics , Harvard researchers are pushing the limits of computing power to achieve new breakthroughs in science and engineering. What will high-performance computing mean for you? Sustainable energy To select the best chemicals for use in a flow battery, the researchers relied on high-performance computing power.
Computer Science/Telecom - Mathematics
22.07.2014
Built for speed: Designing exascale computers
"Imagine a heart surgeon operating to repair a blocked coronary artery. Someday soon, the surgeon might run a detailed computer simulation of blood flowing through the patient's arteries, showing how millions of red blood cells jostle and tumble through the small vessels.
Social Sciences
22.07.2014
Blacks lose homes more today than in '90s
New forms of racial inequality make homeownership a risky investment for African-Americans, according to a new study by Cornell and Rice University sociologists.
Social Sciences - Administration/Government
22.07.2014
Majority of Texas Voters Want Tighter Immigration Laws, UT/Texas Tribune Poll Shows
AUSTIN, Texas — The current migrant crisis on the Texas border comes weeks after the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll found that many Texans believe immigration and border security are the two most important problems facing the state. The statewide poll, conduced in late May and early June before the situation on the border drew national attention, featured a battery of questions about Texans' attitudes on border security and immigration.
Physics/Materials Science - Astronomy
22.07.2014
Birthday bash to celebrate laser inventor Charles Townes' 99th
Birthday bash to celebrate laser inventor Charles Townes’ 99th
Laser inventor Charles Hard Townes, professor emeritus of physics at the University of California, Berkeley, turns 99 on July 28, and an adoring campus is throwing him a long-overdue birthday party.
22.07.2014
UChicago to test cAlert emergency system on July 24
UChicago officials will conduct a routine test of cAlert, its emergency notification system, about 10 a.m. on Thursday, July 24.
Environmental Sciences - Earth Sciences
22.07.2014
North Atlantic right whale's prospects tied to climate
North Atlantic right whale's prospects tied to climate
A pleasant scientific surprise: The North Atlantic right whale population - once projected for extinction - exhibited an unexpected increase in calf production and population size during the past decade.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.07.2014
Researchers answer 'provocative question' on breast cancer
A Cornell proposal to study obesity as a risk factor for breast cancer has received support from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health. Claudia Fischbach-Teschl, associate professor of biomedical engineering, and colleagues at Cornell and Weill Cornell Medical College have received a $1.34 million grant to study whether obesity, a known risk factor for breast cancer, changes breast tissue in a manner similar to tumors, thereby permitting the disease to develop.
History/Archeology
22.07.2014
Carnegie Mellon’s Scott Sandage Helps "Modern Family’s" Jesse Tyler Ferguson Learn His Family History on "Who Do You Think You Are?"
Press Release: Carnegie Mellon's Scott Sandage Helps "Modern Family's" Jesse Tyler Ferguson Learn His Family History on "Who Do You Think You Are?"-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Administration/Government
22.07.2014
Fly's Super-Hearing Power Could Aid Humans
Fly’s Super-Hearing Power Could Aid Humans
AUSTIN, Texas — A team of researchers at the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin has developed a tiny, low-power device that mimics a fly's hearing mechanism.
History/Archeology - Architecture
22.07.2014
'Pompeii of the north' revealed by archaeologists
‘Pompeii of the north’ revealed by archaeologists
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue. 'Pompeii of the north' revealed by archaeologists Excavations at a Roman site in County Durham have revealed the 'Pompeii of the north', say archaeologists.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
22.07.2014
Making Chocolate Sustainable
Huck scientists find that spraying the leaves of Theobroma cacao trees with a non-toxic solution enhances natural disease resistence. Cocoa farmers this year will lose an estimated 30-40% of their crop to pests and disease, and with chocolate prices having risen globally by roughly two-thirds in the past decade, concern is growing about sustainability in cocoa production, particularly the environmental impact and human health risks of toxic agrichemicals - organochloride insecticides and heavy-metal-based fungicides - used in cocoa production to fight pests and disease.
Life Sciences
22.07.2014
Bright spark lights up Brain Bee
Bright spark lights up Brain Bee
Queensland's “brainiest student” has been announced, with 14-year-old Sophie Watson out-smarting 170 other high school students to become the 2014 Queensland Brain Bee Champion at The University of Queensland today.
Life Sciences
22.07.2014
Wildlife hospitals save 16,000 animals in four years
Wildlife hospitals save 16,000 animals in four years
Birds are the most commonly rescued wildlife in Queensland, with the laughing kookaburra among our hardiest species, according to new research from The University of Queensland's Gatton Campus.
Business/Economics
22.07.2014
Research hub to boost dairy product innovation
Research hub to boost dairy product innovation
Longer-lasting Australian dairy products with high nutritional value will soon be available in Australia and overseas, thanks to a major industrial research initiative.
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
22.07.2014
Innovations set to improve dairy products
Longer-lasting Australian dairy products with high nutritional value will soon be available to consumers in Australia and overseas thanks to a major industrial research initiative.
Earth Sciences - Environmental Sciences
22.07.2014
Commercial Fishing’s Impact on Sharks
UM Rosenstiel School and Abess Center-led study provides new information for shark conservation efforts July 22, 2014 MIAMI -A new study that examined the survival rates of 12 different shark species when captured as unintentional bycatch in commercial longline fishing operations found large differences in survival rates across the 12 species, with bigeye thresher, dusky, and scalloped hammerhead being the most vulnerable.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
21.07.2014
Toyota Gift Will Support Penn Research on Automotive Electronic and Computer Systems
Toyota Gift Will Support Penn Research on Automotive Electronic and Computer Systems
The University of Pennsylvania's PRECISE Center has received $120,000 from the Toyota InfoTechnology Center.
Astronomy
21.07.2014
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.07.2014
Some aggressive tumors silence genes that fight cancer
A study led by Yale Cancer Center may provide clues to how some aggressive cancers turn off, or silence, genes critical to suppressing tumors.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.07.2014
Metabolic Enzyme Stops Progression of Most Common Type of Kidney Cancer
Metabolic Enzyme Stops Progression of Most Common Type of Kidney Cancer
In an analysis of small molecules called metabolites used by the body to make fuel in normal and cancerous cells in human kidney tissue, a research team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania identified an enzyme key to applying the brakes on tumor growth.
History/Archeology
21.07.2014
Comment: Don’t stop toddlers running around museums – it could help them learn
" My observations indicate a different kind of learning is going on for these young children. Rather than learning facts about the exhibits in the museum, they were learning with their bodies.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering
21.07.2014
Migrating wildebeests, raging hippos, and robotic boats on Kenya's Mara River
Above: Amanda Subalusky and Chris Dutton of the Yale Mara Project describe their research on the impact of wildebeests and hippos on rivers within Kenya's renowned Maasai Mara National Reserve.
Study of Religions
21.07.2014
Comment: Hollywood’s slew of biblical films is no return from Exodus
" Wherever you look you can find the Bible lurking. What is new in the latest offerings from Hollywood is how it's packaging the Bible – but then the Bible is constantly repackaged and retold for new audiences.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
21.07.2014
World-leading biophysicist to head Biological Sciences at Leeds
Professor John Ladbury has been appointed Dean of the Faculty of Biological Sciences at the University of Leeds.
Astronomy
21.07.2014
Messy peaks of Zucchius
Title The messy peaks of Zucchius Released 21/07/2014 10:29 am Copyright ESA/SMART-1/AMIE camera team/ Space Exploration Institute Description Even to the naked eye, our Moon looks heavily cratered.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Astronomy
21.07.2014
Stem cells aid muscle repair and strengthening after resistance exercise
University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Marni Boppart studies the mechanisms that enable muscles to recover and grow stronger after exercise. CHAMPAIGN, Ill. A new study in mice reveals that mesenchymal (mezz-EN-chem-uhl) stem cells (MSCs) help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
21.07.2014
Yimon Aye is a Beckman Young Investigator
Yimon Aye, assistant professor of chemistry and chemical biology, has received a Beckman Young Investigator award from the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation.
Life Sciences - Earth Sciences
21.07.2014
Research in the news: A 520 million-year-old food plan
Research in the news: A 520 million-year-old food plan
Anyone who's read a children's menu at a restaurant knows that kids and adults tend to like different foods.
Chemistry - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
21.07.2014
£1.8 million investment boosts cutting-edge molecular science at Imperial
£1.8 million investment boosts cutting-edge molecular science at Imperial
London and Westminster MP Mark Field visits Imperial today to launch a £1.8 million upgrade to the Department of Chemistry's analytical facilities. The department has upgraded its NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) Spectrometer , X-ray Diffractometer and Mass Spectrometer machines, which use highly sophisticated and powerful technology to conduct core chemistry experiments.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
21.07.2014
Study to trial intense exercise to aid mental health
Study to trial intense exercise to aid mental health
Can high-intensity exercise improve the physical and emotional health of people with mental illness? University of Queensland researchers are seeking volunteers to help find out. Researchers from the Centre for Research on Exercise, Physical Activity and Health at UQ's School of Human Movement Studies hope to improve the wellbeing of people with mental illness by comparing high-intensity to moderate-intensity exercise.
Medicine/Pharmacology
21.07.2014
Partners of miscarriage sufferers 'ignored'
Partners of miscarriage sufferers ’ignored’
The partners of women who miscarry often feel invisible, ignored and sidelined during and after miscarriage - and unable to talk about their own feelings of loss and pain - according to new findings from UCL and the Miscarriage Association.
Event - Environmental Sciences
21.07.2014
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Physics/Materials Science
21.07.2014
New material puts a twist in light
New material puts a twist in light
A team from the Research School of Physics and Engineering have uncovered the secret to twisting light at will. It is the latest step in the development of photonics, the faster, more compact and less carbon-hungry successor to electronics. A random find in the washing basket led the team to create the latest in a new breed of materials known as metamaterials.
Life Sciences - Event
21.07.2014
Royal recognition for UQ researcher
Royal recognition for UQ researcher
Studies involving some of the world's smallest creatures have resulted in one of the world's biggest honours for University of Queensland researcher Professor Mandyam Srinivasan.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
20.07.2014
New method for extracting radioactive elements from air and water
New method for extracting radioactive elements from air and water
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have successfully tested a material that can extract atoms of rare or dangerous elements such as radon from the air. Gases such as radon, xenon and krypton all occur naturally in the air but in minute quantities - typically less than one part per million.  As a result they are expensive to extract for use in industries such as lighting or medicine and, in the case of radon, the gas can accumulate in buildings.  In the US alone, radon accounts for around 21,000 lung cancer deaths a year.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
20.07.2014
Tiny laser sensor heightens bomb detection sensitivity
New technology under development at UC Berkeley could soon give bomb-sniffing dogs some serious competition. A team of researchers led by Xiang Zhang, UC Berkeley professor of mechanical engineering, has found a way to dramatically increase the sensitivity of a light-based plasmon sensor to detect incredibly minute concentrations of explosives.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.07.2014
Using ’Big Data’ approach to map relationships between human and animal diseases
This image describes the number and types of pathogens found in EU countries.
Physics/Materials Science
18.07.2014
Tracking the breakup of Arctic summer sea ice
As sea ice begins to melt back toward its late September minimum, it is being watched as never before.
Social Sciences - Administration/Government
18.07.2014
'Not by STEM alone': Panelists survey state of higher ed
'Not by STEM alone': Panelists survey state of higher ed
The closing session of a three-day conference on the future of higher education was soft on numbers but hard on detailing the pressing choices ahead.
Chemistry
18.07.2014
UW researchers create safe, resistant material to store waste
The researchers' material, shown being installed at a site in the Middle East, combines sodium bentonite clay and polymers to create a substance that can withstand industrial waste.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
18.07.2014
Two life-changing ideas selected as Google Impact finalists
Two projects involving Oxford University technology are among the ten finalists in the 2014 Google Impact Challenge, and you can vote to help decide the winners.
Social Sciences - Event
18.07.2014
Short Films, Big Impact
18 Jul 2014 On Wednesday, 23 July we launch eight short films showcasing the wider benefits of academic research in the social sciences and of engagement with the local community.
Event
18.07.2014
The 2014 legacy: what will it mean for Glasgow?
What will Glasgow's 2014 legacy be? While the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games are first and foremost a festival of sport and a showcase of the city and nation, the Games are underpinned by expectations that they deliver various long-term legacy outcomes.
Physics/Materials Science
18.07.2014
Extra time in math class has its minuses, says Stanford scholar
Eric Taylor, a PhD student at Stanford University's Center for Education Policy Analysis, found that students who spent more of the school day in math class had higher math scores, but the gains did not last for long.
Architecture - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.07.2014
Breathing new life into the yoga experience
A unique new architectural environment for people who practice yoga and meditation is planning to take this ancient discipline into the digital era. ‘ExoBuilding' is a piece of adaptive architecture which has been designed and built by a team of scientists and architects at The University of Nottingham.
Medicine/Pharmacology
18.07.2014
Imperial and Zhejiang University launch data science collaboration
Imperial and Zhejiang University launch data science collaboration
Some of the UK and China's leading data scientists will team up at a new London lab thanks to a partnership between Imperial and Zhejiang University.
Business/Economics - Social Sciences
18.07.2014
One in four could not find £200 in an emergency, research shows
Nearly a quarter of people would be unable to find £200 at short notice, new research shows. One in six admit they would have to borrow the money, with a further 8% saying they simply could not pay, according to data published in an annual financial-state-of-the-nation report by academics. And most people continue to cut back on their spending, despite recent signs of recovery for the economy.
Astronomy
18.07.2014
Astronomy
18.07.2014
ESA mission name for astronaut Tim Peake: Principia
18 July 2014 When ESA astronaut Tim Peake sets off for his six-month space journey next year, he will be flying under the mission name of Principia.
Business/Economics - Environmental Sciences
18.07.2014
Kleinman Gift Establishes Energy Policy Center at Penn
Kleinman Gift Establishes Energy Policy Center at Penn
The Kleinman Center for Energy Policy has been established at PennDesign with a $10 million gift from Scott, C'94, W'94, and Wendy Kleinman.
Administration/Government
18.07.2014
Environmental Sciences - Life Sciences
18.07.2014
Scientists enlist big data to guide conservation efforts
Scientists enlist big data to guide conservation efforts
Despite a deluge of new information about the diversity and distribution of plants and animals around the globe, "big data” has yet to make a mark on conservation efforts to preserve the planet's biodiversity.
Environmental Sciences - Earth Sciences
18.07.2014
Scientists and community collaborate to secure future of Australia’s ecosystems
Scientists and community collaborate to secure future of Australia's ecosystems 18 July 2014 The University of Sydney's Faculty of Science has been part of a major collaboration to create Au
Agronomy/Food Science - Philosophy
18.07.2014
Outcome of inquiry into ’Australian Paradox’ research
Outcome of inquiry into 'Australian Paradox' research 18 July 2014 A formal inquiry into allegations brought against a University of Sydney academic and her research collaborator has found no research misconduct occurred. There was no breach of the University's research code of conduct or of the Australian code for the responsible conduct of research.
Agronomy/Food Science
18.07.2014
Statement from Professor Jennie Brand-Miller and Dr Alan Barclay
Statement from Professor Jennie Brand-Miller and Dr Alan Barclay 18 July 2014 The following is a statement from the University of Sydney's Professor Jennie Brand-Miller and Dr Alan Barclay from the Glycemic Index Foundation (Ltd). We welcome the report of an independent inquiry into a complaint against us as authors of The Australian Paradox: A Substantial Decline in Sugars Intake over the Same Timeframe that Overweight and Obesity Have Increased (Nutrients 2011) and The Australian Paradox Revisited (Nutrients 2012).
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
18.07.2014
Medicine/Pharmacology
17.07.2014
High-quality traffic-free routes encourage more walking and cycling
This is one of the first studies to show that changing the environment to support walking and cycling in the UK can have measurable benefits for public health David Ogilvie The provision of new, high-quality, traffic-free cycling and walking routes in local communities has encouraged more people to get about by foot and by bike, according to a new study published today in the American Journal of Public Health .
Administration/Government - Law/Forensics
17.07.2014
U-M initiative transforming what it means to ’go to court’
ANN ARBOR-The University of Michigan is spearheading the development of what is believed to be the first-of-its-kind technology to help people who have been charged with minor offenses interact with courts online, without needing to hire an attorney.
Law/Forensics
17.07.2014
Tory plans on European Court of Human Rights 'cosmetic nonsense', says legal expert
Tory plans on European Court of Human Rights ‘cosmetic nonsense’, says legal expert
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Business/Economics - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.07.2014
Book examines hows and whys of economic choices
Valerie Reyna, professor of human development in Cornell's College of Human Ecology, and graduate student Evan Wilhelms are editors of a new book: "Neuroeconomics, Judgment and Decision Making" (Taylor & Francis).
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.07.2014
Food-poisoning pathogen detection speeds up dramatically
Food-poisoning pathogen detection speeds up dramatically
New York is on the front lines of detecting foodborne pathogen outbreaks, thanks to a partnership between public health scientists and Cornell researchers. Members of the Cornell Food Safety Lab, led by food science professor Martin Wiedmann and research associate Henk den Bakker, are helping the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) harness the capabilities and cost efficiencies of next-generation DNA sequencing techniques to rapidly identify strains of salmonella and read the results in a way that could quicken responses to potential outbreaks.
Arts and Design - Literature/Linguistics
17.07.2014
Rude a #1 Billboard hit for MAGIC! man Mark Pellizzer
For Faculty of Music graduate and MAGIC! guitarist Mark Pellizzer there are no tricks to writing a Billboard #1 hit single – just hard work, an ear for a musical hook, and persistence.
Physics/Materials Science
17.07.2014
There's a kind of Hush surrounding quantum systems
Has a persistent noise ever kept you awake at night? Well it isn't just you. Scientists at The University of Nottingham have had the same problem with quantum technologies. But their sleepless nights could be over. Inspired by old technology, researchers at The University of Nottingham in collaboration with a team from The University of Queensland have proposed a way to make technologies of the future more stable.
Event
17.07.2014
Issues of social and educational disadvantage addressed by key research event at Sussex
Issues of social and educational disadvantage addressed by key research event at Sussex
Issues of social and educational disadvantage addressed by key research event at Sussex The University's Centre for Teaching and Learning Research (CTLR) hosted an event on campus on Monday (14
Physics/Materials Science - Astronomy
17.07.2014
It's go time for LUX-Zeplin experiment in dark matter
It’s go time for LUX-Zeplin experiment in dark matter
From the physics labs at Yale University to the bottom of a played-out gold mine in South Dakota, a new generation of dark matter experiments is ready to commence. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and the National Science Foundation recently gave the go-ahead to LUX-Zeplin (LZ), a key experiment in the hunt for dark matter, the invisible substance that may make up much of the universe.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Physics/Materials Science
17.07.2014
Future Electronics May Depend on Lasers, Not Quartz
Future Electronics May Depend on Lasers, Not Quartz
Nearly all electronics require devices called oscillators that create precise frequencies-frequencies used to keep time in wristwatches or to transmit reliable signals to radios. For nearly 100 years, these oscillators have relied upon quartz crystals to provide a frequency reference, much like a tuning fork is used as a reference to tune a piano.
Life Sciences - Business/Economics
17.07.2014
Infosys Co-founder Kris Gopalakrishnan Donates $1.8 Million to Carnegie Mellon To Promote Brain Research and Education
Press Release: Infosys Co-founder Kris Gopalakrishnan Donates $1.8 Million to Carnegie Mellon To Promote Brain Research and Education-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University New Collabo
Literature/Linguistics - Architecture
17.07.2014
How people power saved Bloomsbury from destruction
The story of how 'one of the last villages in London' was saved from demolition to make way for the British Library is the subject of new research and an exhibition which opened in Bloomsbury this week.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
17.07.2014
ATV’s fiery break-up to be seen from inside
17 July 2014 As ESA's remaining supply ferry to the International Space Station burns up in the atmosphere, its final moments as its hull disintegrates will be recorded from the inside by a unique infrared camera.
Medicine/Pharmacology
17.07.2014
Alliance Boots and The University of Manchester renew partnership
17 Jul 2014 Five year skin research programme to help further develop the understanding of skin ageing.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.07.2014
Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) and the books that made the father of anatomy
Born 500 years ago, Andreas Vesalius has iconic status in the history of science.  Cambridge University Library holds several copies of the remarkable books that he published to revive the lost art of anatomy and promote his own career as a physician.
Business/Economics - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.07.2014
Novartis maintained strong innovation momentum in second quarter, while reconfirming full year outlook
Net sales grew 2% in Q2, with core operating leverage across Q2 and H1 Net sales of USD 14.6 billion grew 2% (+2% cc ) in Q2; USD 28.7 billion (+2%, +2% cc) in H1 Strong operating income growth i
Arts and Design - Environmental Sciences
17.07.2014
UQP author built Pig City on rock and roll
University of Queensland Press has released a 10 th anniversary edition of author Andrew Stafford 's cult classic Pig City .
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.07.2014
Foodborne pathogen detection speeds up dramatically
Foodborne pathogen detection speeds up dramatically
New York is on the front lines of detecting foodborne pathogen outbreaks, thanks to a partnership between public health scientists and Cornell researchers. Members of the Cornell Food Safety Lab, led by food science professor Martin Wiedmann and research associate Henk den Bakker, are helping the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) harness the capabilities and cost efficiencies of next-generation DNA sequencing techniques to rapidly identify strains of salmonella and read the results in a way that could quicken responses to potential outbreaks.
Business/Economics
17.07.2014
Innovation index highlights advances in Europe, Africa
Innovation index highlights advances in Europe, Africa
The Global Innovation Index 2014, co-authored by Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management Dean Soumitra Dutta, was released in Sydney, Australia, July 18 at the B20 gathering of international business leaders.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.07.2014
Developed by UCLA team, new terahertz modulator could lead to more advanced medical and security imaging
UCLA Engineering Electron microscope image showing the metasurface for a terahertz modulator developed by a group led by UCLA professor Mona Jarrahi.
Philosophy - Social Sciences
16.07.2014
Facebook Study Did Not Breach Research Ethics, Says Carnegie Mellon’s Alex John London
Press Release: Facebook Study Did Not Breach Research Ethics, Says Carnegie Mellon's Alex John London-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University : Shilo Rea / 412-268-6094 / shilo [a] cmu (p) edu PITTSBURGH—The Facebook study that unknowingly put nearly 700,000 of the social networking site's users in a psychological experiment was not ethically ideal, but it did not breach research ethics, according to Carnegie Mellon University's Alex John London (right).
Astronomy
16.07.2014
Finding NEEMO
NEEMO - NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations - trains astronauts for life in space. Living and working in an underwater base is similar to being on a space station.
Social Sciences - Administration/Government
16.07.2014
Treatment of UK’s ‘sans papiers’ damned
16 Jul 2014 Undocumented migrants living in the UK and their children face hostility from officials and the public, ill-health, self-harm, and even suicide, according to a consultation, whose report is published this week.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
16.07.2014
From bench to bedside to community: 50 years of nursing research at Penn State
Donna Fick, Distinguished Professor of Nursing, standing left, and her research team a prospective patient for a study on early detection of delirium superimposed on dementia at Mount Nittany Medical Center. A Penn State College of Nursing researcher works with colleagues at other universities and academic medical centers to identify genetic and hormonal links to depression and eating disorders in adolescents.
Environmental Sciences
16.07.2014
Sustainable Support
UM researchers are examining which bridge designs and materials are the most eco-friendly. By Marie Guma-Diaz and.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) UM News CORAL GABLES, Fla. (July 16, 2014) — When envisioning a new structure, engineers often have to balance design choices against the environmental impact of materials used.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
16.07.2014
Researcher: Hallucinatory 'voices' shaped by local culture
Researcher: Hallucinatory ’voices’ shaped by local culture
Stanford anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann found that voice-hearing experiences of people with serious psychotic disorders are shaped by local culture – in the United States, the voices are harsh and threatening, in Africa and India, they are more benign and playful. This may have clinical implications for how to treat people with schizophrenia, she suggests.
Literature/Linguistics - Social Sciences
16.07.2014
Stanford poetry scholar offers new perspective on Chinese poet
In the first comprehensive study in English, East Asian languages and cultures Professor Ronald Egan argues that the poetry of 12th-century writer Li Qingzhao has been consistently misrepresented due to centuries of gender bias.
Literature/Linguistics
16.07.2014
On not forgetting Nadine Gordimer
In this article, originally posted on the CRASSH website, Graham Riach - a PhD candidate in the English Faculty working on South African literature - explores the life and legacy of Nadine Gordimer, who recently passed away.
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
16.07.2014
Olver to lead University Research Park
A worker programs and tests a new line of CapTel, a captioned telephone system, at one of Ultratec's multiple telecommunication and manufacturing facilities at University Research Park.
Physics/Materials Science
16.07.2014
Tracking the breakup of Arctic summer sea ice
Tracking the breakup of Arctic summer sea ice
University of Washington As sea ice begins to melt back toward its late September minimum, it is being watched as never before.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
16.07.2014
Pre-diabetes label 'unhelpful and unnecessary'
Pre-diabetes label ’unhelpful and unnecessary’
Labelling people with moderately high blood sugar as pre-diabetic is a drastically premature measure with no medical value and huge financial and social costs, say researchers from UCL and the Mayo Clinic, Minnesota. The analysis, published in the BMJ, considered whether a diagnosis of pre-diabetes carried any health benefits such as improved diabetes prevention.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
16.07.2014
Watch your step: Older African Americans fall less often
ANN ARBOR-A University of Michigan study examining how race and ethnicity predicts the frequency of falls by older people shows that African Americans are less likely to fall than others. "Millions of older adults living in community settings are just one bad fall away from a nursing home," said Emily Nicklett, an assistant professor of social work and the study's lead author.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
16.07.2014
Self-assembling nanoparticle could improve MRI scanning for cancer diagnosis
Self-assembling nanoparticle could improve MRI scanning for cancer diagnosis
Scientists have designed a new self-assembling nanoparticle that targets tumours, to help doctors diagnose cancer earlier. The new nanoparticle, developed by researchers at Imperial College London, boosts the effectiveness of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanning by specifically seeking out receptors that are found in cancerous cells.
Medicine/Pharmacology
16.07.2014
People wanted for healthy eating and exercise trial to prevent type-2 diabetes
People wanted for healthy eating and exercise trial to prevent type-2 diabetes 16 July 2014 Sydney University is calling out for Sydneysiders to join a research study assessing the effects of healthy eating and exercise on the risk of type-2 diabetes.
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.07.2014
Highest risk of suicide in first two weeks after leaving hospital
16 Jul 2014 Researchers call for suicides soon after discharge and deaths following restraint to be 'never events' in NHS. Mental health patients are at their highest risk of dying by suicide in the first two weeks after leaving hospital - a report out today shows. Around 3,225 patients died by suicide in the UK within the first three months of their discharge from hospital – 18% of all patient suicides, between 2002-2012.
Medicine/Pharmacology
16.07.2014
Researchers respond to criticism of hospital mortality data
Researchers respond to criticism of hospital mortality data
Data on hospital mortality rates are essential for identifying and tackling variations in the quality of healthcare, argues a report published today.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
16.07.2014
Business/Economics - Arts and Design
16.07.2014
Using the Early History of Jazz as a Case Study for Innovation, Marketing and More
Damon Phillips remembers finding the Smithsonian Collection of Classic Jazz in his parents' record collection with its 46-page booklet of liner notes about the music when he was about 10 years old.
Astronomy - Earth Sciences
16.07.2014
ESA’s spaceplane set for flight
16 July 2014 All eyes are on ESA's spaceplane to showcase reentry technologies after its unconventional launch on a Vega rocket this November.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.07.2014
Scientists gear up to fight deadly snake fungal disease
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Researchers have developed a faster and more accurate way to test for infection with Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola , a fungus that is killing snakes in the Midwest and eastern United States. The test also allows scientists to monitor the progression of the infection in living snakes. The researchers reported on the test at the 2014 Mycological Society of America Annual Meeting.
Physics/Materials Science - Astronomy
15.07.2014
Next-Generation Dark Matter Experiments Get the Green Light
Next-Generation Dark Matter Experiments Get the Green Light
Last week, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and the National Science Foundation announced support for a suite of upcoming experiments to search for dark matter that will be many times more sensitive than those currently deployed. These so-called Generation 2 Dark Matter Experiments include the LUX-Zeplin (LZ) experiment, an international collaboration formed in 2012, managed by DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (Berkeley Lab) and to be located at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota.
Sport Sciences - Business/Economics
15.07.2014
Man U deal is ‘good news for Adidas’
15 Jul 2014 Yesterday, Manchester United announced a 10-year contract with Adidas, making it the club's new kit sponsor for a record-breaking minimum £750m.
Environmental Sciences - Chemistry
15.07.2014
Sustainable skincare range created from waste products of grapes
University of Leeds spin-out Keracol Limited has teamed up with Marks & Spencer to produce a natural skin care range using the waste products of grapes. The research team at Keracol found a new way to extract resveratrol, a natural molecule found in the outer skins of red grapes, which is an antioxidant and known to have protective anti-ageing properties.
Environmental Sciences
15.07.2014
Hungry, invasive ‘crazy worm’ makes first appearance in Wisconsin
Wisconsin's newest invasive species has done its best to stay underground, but the voracious, numerous and mysterious Asian crazy worm has emerged for the first time in the state on the campus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Environmental Sciences - Business/Economics
15.07.2014
University of Minnesota selects MnDRIVE projects to develop safe, sustainable food system
Seventeen new research projects involving University of Minnesota researchers and more than 65 food industry partners have been awarded $3 million in funds through the U's  MnDRIVE initiative, the university announced today.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.07.2014
Clinical child psychologist joins Network on Child Protection and Well-Being
HARRISBURG, Pa. Brian Allen is looking forward to building Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital's TLC (Transforming the Lives of Children) Clinic from the ground up, relying on evidence-based practices as its foundation. Allen joined Penn State's Network on Child Protection and Well-Being in June as the sixth of at least 12 new co-funded faculty hires.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Computer Science/Telecom
15.07.2014
Supercomputer to boost health research
A new supercomputer hosted at the University of Leeds is set to transform health research in the North of England.
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics - Chemistry
15.07.2014
Best-ever efficiency points to clean, green gas-diesel engine
Sage Kokjohn, left, and Rolf Reitz check a room with test monitors and air regulators that are connected to an operating, one-cylinder diesel engine in the Caterpillar Engine Lab at the Engineering Research Building.
Environmental Sciences - Chemistry
15.07.2014
Sustainable, sharing communities explored in Karen Litfin's book 'Ecovillages'
Sustainable, sharing communities explored in Karen Litfin’s book ‘Ecovillages’
University of Washington Karen Litfin is a University of Washington associate professor of political science and author of the book " Ecovillages: Lessons for Sustainable Community.” She answered a few questions about the book, and her work, for UW Today.
Life Sciences
15.07.2014
Researchers talk about talking to the animals for BBC documentary
Researchers talk about talking to the animals for BBC documentary
Sussex researchers talk about talking to the animals for BBC documentary Mammal communication experts at the University of Sussex will be demonstrating just how far they've got with their research for a major two-part BBC documentary this week. Professor Karen McComb and Dr David Reby are appearing in ‘ Talk to the Animals ,' which is being broadcast on BBC1 on Wednesday and Thursday (16 and 17 July) at 8pm and features experts from around the globe who are working on finding out what animals are saying to each other.
Physics/Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
15.07.2014
Two Imperial researchers receive Fellowships from Royal Academy of Engineering
Two Imperial researchers receive Fellowships from Royal Academy of Engineering
Imperial research to develop safer nuclear reactors and more fuel-efficient vehicles gets a boost, thanks to new Fellowships awarded this month.
Business/Economics
15.07.2014
Study examines impact of local authority budget cuts on election results
Study examines impact of local authority budget cuts on election results
Cuts to local authority budgets had a more significant impact on councils in the North and councils controlled by Labour Higher levels of deprivation appear to explain these trends Conservative
Life Sciences - Psychology
15.07.2014
Brain responses to emotional images predict PTSD symptoms after Boston Marathon bombing
Brain responses to emotional images predict PTSD symptoms after Boston Marathon bombing
University of Washington The area of the brain that plays a primary role in emotional learning and the acquisition of fear - the amygdala - may hold the key to who is most vulnerable to post-traumatic stress disorder. Researchers at the University of Washington, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Boston University collaborated on a unique opportunity to study whether patterns of brain activity predict teenagers' response to a terrorist attack.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
15.07.2014
Toward ultimate light efficiency on the cheap
Toward ultimate light efficiency on the cheap
ANN ARBOR-Researchers at the University of Michigan have taken a major stride toward perfectly efficient lighting that is also relatively inexpensive and simple to make.
Physics/Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
15.07.2014
Two Imperial researchers announced as Fellows of Royal Academy of Engineering
Two Imperial researchers announced as Fellows of Royal Academy of Engineering
Imperial research to develop safer nuclear reactors and more fuel-efficient vehicles gets a boost, thanks to new Fellowships awarded this month.
Architecture
15.07.2014
New research and exhibition takes the public inside Mackintosh's architecture
New research and exhibition takes the public inside Mackintosh’s architecture
A new exhibition opening at the Hunterian Art Gallery this Friday (18 July) will offer new insights into the architectural work of Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The opening of the exhibition coincides with the culmination of a four-year research project, led by experts at the University of Glasgow. The ‘Mackintosh Architecture: Context, Making and Meaning' project is the largest study of Mackintosh's architectural works ever undertaken and has led to a revaluation of this remarkably under-researched area of Mackintosh's output.
Astronomy
15.07.2014
Test driving rover
Title Test driving remote-control rover Released 14/07/2014 11:58 am Copyright ESA-L. Wellard Description A team at ESA's Space Operations Centre, ESOC, in Darmstadt, Darmstadt
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.07.2014
Scientists crack the code of a cancer-causing parasite
Dr Andi Horvath  andrea.horvath(at)unimelb.edu.au 041 935 935 0     Scientists have sequenced the genome and characterised the genes of the Asian liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini .
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.07.2014
New hope for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease
Judes Poirier, PhD, C.Q., from the Douglas Mental Health Institute and McGill University in Montréal (Canada) and his team have discovered that a relatively frequent genetic variant actually conveys significant protection against the common form of Alzheimer's disease and can delay the onset of the disease by as much as 4 years.
Astronomy - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
15.07.2014
Space Engineering facility takes off
Space Engineering facility takes off
Australian space scientists will no longer need to go offshore to build satellites, following the completion of the Advanced Instrumentation and Technology Centre (AITC) at The Australian National University.
Business/Economics
15.07.2014
New Imperial and KPMG institute will harness the power of corporate data
New Imperial and KPMG institute will harness the power of corporate data
KPMG and Imperial College London today announce the launch of a major new partnership to create the 'KPMG Centre for Advanced Business Analytics'.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.07.2014
Novartis to license Google "smart lens" technology
Innovative technology offers potential to transform eye care and further enhance Alcon's leadership in contact lenses and intraocular lenses Agreement is a first step for Novartis to evo
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.07.2014
Novartis announces collaboration with Banner Alzheimer’s Institute on a pioneering prevention study for Alzheimer’s Disease
Two Novartis anti-amyloid investigational treatments will be studied in people with a genetic risk of developing Alzheimer's Disease (AD) The build-up of amyloid in the brain is believed to be
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
15.07.2014
CBT in school reduces childhood anxiety
  Introducing lessons in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in primary schools would significantly reduce anxiety levels among 9 - 10 year olds, according to new research published today (Wednesday) in The Lancet Psychiatry. The study, from researchers at Cardiff University and the Universities of Bath, Oxford and Exeter, suggests that anxiety prevention programmes delivered in schools for Year 5 pupils significantly reduce anxiety symptoms.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.07.2014
Fungicides for crops: worrying link to fungal drug resistance warn scientists
15 Jul 2014 Crop spraying on British farms could be aiding a life-threatening fungus suffered by tens of thousand of people in the UK each year. New research by British and Dutch scientists has found that Aspergillus – a common fungus that attacks the lungs and is found in soil and other organic matter – has become resistant to life - saving drugs in parts of rural Yorkshire.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Computer Science/Telecom
15.07.2014
Crowd-source snaps of falling space debris
Crowd-source snaps of falling space debris
Crowd-source snaps of falling space debris 15 July 2014 Australian researchers who are designing robotic rovers capable of searching for fallen space debris are asking people to share images or videos that they may have captured during last Thursday evening 's skyfall. University of Sydney robotics researchers in conjunction with scientists at Curtin University believe the images or videos could help program a rover 's ability to track the why, when and where of a space junk movements.
Business/Economics - Environmental Sciences
15.07.2014
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.07.2014
Viewing how neurons work
Viewing how neurons work New tool allows researchers to stimulate them and observe their signals in real time I n oncology, the notion of personalized medicine - in which genetic tools can be used precisely to characterize a patient's cancer and tailor treatment to a genetic profile - is now all but standard practice.
Medicine/Pharmacology
14.07.2014
UCLA doctor to lead major trial to prevent fall-related injuries among older people
New patient-centered strategies to be tested in large, multisite trial funded by NIH and Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Enrique Rivero Each year, one in three adults aged 65 or older falls, and a third of these falls result in moderate to severe injuries that can lead to further declines in health and a loss of independence.
Medicine/Pharmacology
14.07.2014
Donation boosts College research into heart conditions that cause sudden death
Donation boosts College research into heart conditions that cause sudden death
Imperial has received a £50,000 donation from charitable foundation Dan's Trust to support a research project into Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome.
Law/Forensics - Social Sciences
14.07.2014
Q&A on child immigration crisis with Law School’s Maria Woltjen
Since October 2013, more than 52,000 children, most from Central America and unaccompanied by adults, have crossed the Southwest border into the United States, according to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
Psychology - Social Sciences
14.07.2014
Power of an Apology
UM researchers explore how conciliatory gestures promote human forgiveness. By Marie Guma-Diaz and.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) UM News CORAL GABLES, Fla. (July 14, 2014) — It's well known that when a person takes steps to make amends for a wrongdoing, the victim is more inclined to forgive and forget.
Astronomy - Administration/Government
14.07.2014
FIA in images
Jean-Jacques Dordain and Arlene Forster Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA Director General, presents to Arlene Forster, Minister for the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Investment, Northern Ireland, the ESA's exhibition at the Farnborough air and space show, on 15 July 2014.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
14.07.2014
Researchers Successfully Alleviate Pulmonary Inflammation through Targeted Drug Delivery
Pulmonary inflammation can cause shallow breathing and the lungs to become brittle in patients who experience multiple blood transfusions, sepsis, lung surgery and acute lung trauma. This complication can leave patients on ventilators, which can further traumatize the lungs, and often results in a mortality rate of 30 to 40 percent.
History/Archeology - Life Sciences
14.07.2014
Sussex historian digs up the facts for major BBC radio series on botany
Sussex historian digs up the facts for major BBC radio series on botany
Sussex historian digs up the facts for major BBC radio series on botany A University of Sussex historian is the advisor on a major new BBC radio series this summer documenting the growth of Kew's Royal Botanic Gardens.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.07.2014
Pinpointing the damage alcohol does to the brain
New research has identified, for the first time, the structural damage at a molecular level that excessive alcohol abuse causes to the brain. The study, led by The University of Nottingham, detected the loss and modification of several key cellular proteins in the brains of alcoholics. Published in the academic journal PloS ONE , the research will help scientists make informed choices on appropriate drugs and diet to reduce brain damage and limit addictive behaviour in alcoholics.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
14.07.2014
Twilight tour highlights heritage grain research
Twilight tour highlights heritage grain research
Farmers hoping to cash in on the latest foodie trends flocked to Freeville, New York, July 1 for a twilight tour of Cornell's value-added grain trials at Homer C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm.
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.07.2014
Minnesota Population Center announces annual IPUMS Research Awards
The Minnesota Population Center (MPC) is excited to announce the winners of its annual IPUMS Research Awards.
Social Sciences - Law/Forensics
14.07.2014
California's prison realignment plan needs adjustments, Stanford law professor says
California’s prison realignment plan needs adjustments, Stanford law professor says
California's shift of thousands of criminals from state prisons into county jails was intended to ease overcrowding, reduce costs and improve rehabilitation while ensuring public safety.
Philosophy - Social Sciences
14.07.2014
Stanford scholar takes a philosophical approach to human behavior
By analyzing how people cooperate and make plans, philosophy Professor Michael Bratman creates a framework for understanding human sociality that has implications in fields ranging from psychology to artificial intelligence.
Computer Science/Telecom - Physics/Materials Science
14.07.2014
New Computing Cluster at Carnegie Mellon Traces Lineage to Los Alamos’ Roadrunner Supercomputer
Press Release: New Computing Cluster at Carnegie Mellon Traces Lineage to Los Alamos' Roadrunner Supercomputer-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University Salvaged Components Reconfigured T
History/Archeology
14.07.2014
Prehistoric ’bookkeeping’ continued long after invention of writing
An ancient token-based recording system from before the dawn of history was rendered obsolete by the birth of writing, according to popular wisdom.
Astronomy
14.07.2014
Extreme explosion
Title Extreme explosion Released 14/07/2014 9:56 am Copyright ESA, illustration by ESA/ECF Description The electromagnetic spectrum is vast, ranging from high-energy gamma rays all the way to low-energy radio waves.