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# "Science Wire" gives access to latest science news from research centers and R&D companies.
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Life Sciences - Computer Science/Telecom
10:02
Neuroscience to Benefit from Hybrid Supercomputer Memory
Neuroscience to Benefit from Hybrid Supercomputer Memory
To handle large amounts of data from detailed brain models, IBM, EPFL, and ETH Zürich are collaborating on a new hybrid memory strategy for supercomputers.
Life Sciences - Computer Science/Telecom
10:02
HBP Summit Showcases Successes of Year One
HBP Summit Showcases Successes of Year One
Heidelberg. The second annual summit of the Human Brain Project (HBP) begins today at the University of Heidelberg. Nearly 400 participants from a dozen countries will present their key results and discuss the future challenges facing global collaborative brain research. Having expanded to 112 Partners in 24 countries in its first year, the HBP is well-placed to set new the frontiers of neuroscience, medicine, and computing.
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
24.01.2015
Blood flow image voted supporters' favourite in BHF competition
Blood flow image voted supporters’ favourite in BHF competition
An image showing a computer model of blood flow has been voted the British Heart Foundation supporters' favourite in a science image competition. ‘Lifelines', by Francesco Iori from the Department of Aeronautics , was one of four images from Imperial College London shortlisted for ‘Reflections of Research' , which showcases images produced by BHF-funded researchers.
Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
Novartis Bexsero vaccine approved by FDA for the prevention of meningitis B, the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in the US
With today's approval, Bexsero is now licensed in 37 countries; since first approval in Europe, over 1 million doses have been distributed worldwide Bexsero's two-dose regimen offers a flexib
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Physics/Materials Science
23.01.2015
Material can be both magnetic and electrically charged
Material can be both magnetic and electrically charged
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have controlled the structure of a material to simultaneously generate both magnetisation and electrical polarisation, an advance which has potential applications in information storage and processing.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
Five intriguing facts about viruses that cause measles, Ebola and other scourges
Viruses are incredibly simple, arguably the most simple living organisms on the planet. They have no brains, no metabolism, and they can't reproduce on their own.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
23.01.2015
Integral manoeuvres for the future
Since 2002, ESA's Integral spacecraft has been observing some of the most violent events in the Universe, including gamma-ray bursts and black holes.
Sport Sciences
23.01.2015
OCR complaint statement
A complaint has been filed with the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights (OCR), against the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities.  The complaint alleges discrimination in inte
Physics/Materials Science
23.01.2015
Catch the Northern Lights with your mobile
Catch the Northern Lights with your mobile
Updates on the best opportunities to spot the Northern Lights in the UK are now available on a mobile phone app developed in association with scientists at Lancaster University.
Pedagogy/Education Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
$3.9 million project will identify, treat Washington state toddlers at risk for autism
$3.9 million project will identify, treat Washington state toddlers at risk for autism
Early detection can make a world of difference for toddlers with autism, but many children do not get diagnosed until they're at least 4 years old.
Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
Novartis drug Jakavi recommended by CHMP for EU approval to treat adults with rare blood cancer polycythemia vera
Polycythemia vera (PV) is associated with overproduction of blood cells that can cause serious cardiovascular complications, such as stroke and heart attack Clinical data show Jakavi (ruxol
Psychology - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
‘Kindness curriculum’ boosts school success in preschoolers
Over the course of 12 weeks, twice a week, the pre-kindergarten students learned their ABCs. Attention, breath and body, caring practice - clearly not the standard letters of the alphabet. Rather, these 4- and-5-year-olds in the Madison Metropolitan School District were part of a study assessing a new curriculum meant to promote social, emotional and academic skills, conducted by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Investigating Healthy Minds (CIHM) at the Waisman Center.
Sport Sciences - Life Sciences
23.01.2015
Concussions – an issue for male and female athletes alike, Stanford professor says
Concussions – an issue for male and female athletes alike, Stanford professor says
William Maloney, professor of orthopaedic surgery, told the Faculty Senate on Thursday that while concussions are a problem in football, they also are a big concern in other sports, including soccer, basketball and club sports, involving both male and female players.
Literature/Linguistics - Philosophy
23.01.2015
Stanford scholar explores Arabic obsession with language
Stanford scholar explores Arabic obsession with language
Through a study of metaphor in medieval Arabic literature, Stanford comparative literature professor Alexander Key finds that the Arab world had a head start on the West when it comes to understanding how language works.
Environmental Sciences - Business/Economics
23.01.2015
Larry Linden: Big changes needed to avert possible climate "catastrophe"
After a career that included work as a White House advisor in the Carter administration and as a partner at Goldman Sachs, Larry Linden SM '70, PhD '76 has turned his attention to what he says is the most critical issue facing humanity today: the threat of catastrophic global climate change.
Environmental Sciences - Business/Economics
23.01.2015
Calculating the future of solar-fuel refineries
A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has developed a new tool to help plot the future of solar fuels.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
23.01.2015
Medicaid "Fee Bump" to Primary Care Doctors Associated with Better Access to Appointments, According to Penn Study
As the United States population has doubled since 1955, the number of inpatient psychiatric beds in the United States has been cut by nearly 95 percent to just 45,000, a wholly inadequate equation when considering that there are currently 10 million U.S. residents with serious mental illness.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
Study Uncovers Secrets of a Clump-Dissolving Protein
Workhorse molecules called heat-shock proteins contribute to refolding proteins that were once misfolded and clumped, causing such disorders as Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. James Shorter, PhD , an associate professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania , has been developing ways to "reprogram" one such protein - a yeast protein called Hsp104 - to improve its therapeutic properties.
Earth Sciences - Environmental Sciences
23.01.2015
Aletsch
ESA Space in Images Title Aletsch Glacier Released 23/01/2015 10:00 am Copyright USGS/ESA Description Parts of the Swiss and Italian Alps are pictured in this satellite image.
Earth Sciences - Environmental Sciences
23.01.2015
A 3-D View of the Greenland Ice Sheet Opens Window on Ice History
A 3-D View of the Greenland Ice Sheet Opens Window on Ice History
AUSTIN, Texas -  Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA's Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet, opening a window on past climate conditions and the ice sheet's potentially perilous future.
Astronomy - Environmental Sciences
23.01.2015
Satellites catch Austfonna shedding ice
Rapid ice loss in a remote Arctic ice cap has been detected by the Sentinel-1A and CryoSat satellites. Located on Norway's Nordaustlandet island in the Svalbard archipelago, parts of the Austfonna ice cap have thinned by more than 50 m since 2012 - about a sixth of the ice's thickness. Over the last two decades, ice loss from the southeast region of Austfonna has increased significantly, and ice thinning has spread over 50 km inland and is now within 10 km of the summit.
Medicine/Pharmacology
23.01.2015
University of Sydney helping to build health capacity in Fiji
A newly refurbished centre dedicated to improving the health of women and children was today opened in Vatukarasa on Fiji's Coral Coast by Fijian Prime Minister Rear Admiral (rtd) J.V.Bainimarama.
Literature/Linguistics
23.01.2015
Advancing the appreciation of Australian literature through new Chair
In a first for Victoria, the Boisbouvier Founding Chair in Australian Literature has been established at the University of Melbourne to advance the teaching, understanding and public appreciation of Australian literature.
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
23.01.2015
Astronomy
22.01.2015
Comet close-ups
Crack extension in Anuket This OSIRIS narrow-angle camera image shows part of a large fracture running across Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's neck, in particular where it has left Hapi and is extending into Anuket. In this orientation, the Seth region is at the uppermost left and Hapi in the lower left.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
22.01.2015
Getting to know Rosetta’s comet
Rosetta is revealing its host comet as having a remarkable array of surface features and with many processes contributing to its activity, painting a complex picture of its evolution.
Psychology - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.01.2015
Comment: Well-being programmes in schools might be doing children more harm than good
Kathryn Ecclestone, Professor of Education at the University of Sheffield, comments on the effects of well-being programmes in schools. by Katherine Ecclestone, 22 January 2015, posted on The Conversation Apocryphal depictions of an unprecedented crisis in young people's mental ill-health and their general vulnerability have been accompanied by increasingly alarmist claims that only schools can address this social "ticking time bomb".
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
22.01.2015
Exotic, gigantic molecules fit inside each other like Russian nesting dolls
University of Chicago scientists have experimentally observed for the first time a phenomenon in ultracold, three-atom molecules predicted by Russian theoretical physicist Vitaly Efimov in 1970. In this quantum phenomenon, called geometric scaling, the triatomic molecules fit inside one another like an infinitely large set of Russian nesting dolls.
Environmental Sciences - Business/Economics
22.01.2015
Boston’s natural gas infrastructure releases high levels of heat-trapping methane
Harvard-led study reveals aging natural gas distribution system short-changes customers, contributes to greenhouse gas buildup - Imagine if every time you filled your car with gas, a few gallons didn't make it into the tank and instead spilled onto the ground.
Administration/Government - Careers/Employment
22.01.2015
Faculty member to share research at special White House meeting
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. College of Education faculty member  Liza Conyers  will share her expertise on HIV and workforce development at a special White House meeting on Monday (Jan.
Environmental Sciences - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
22.01.2015
A new public private collaboration in Singapore aims to develop more eco-friendly ships
‌Singapore's Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Sembcorp Marine, the University of Glasgow and University of Glasgow Singapore (UGS) have signed an agreement to collaborate and d
Physics/Materials Science - Mathematics
22.01.2015
Is glass a true solid?
Does glass ever stop flowing? Researchers at the University of Bristol and Kyoto University have combined computer simulation and information theory, originally invented for telephone communication and cryptography, to answer this puzzling question. Watching a glass blower at work we can clearly see the liquid nature of hot glass.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
22.01.2015
Scientists set quantum speed limit
University of California, Berkeley, scientists have proved a fundamental relationship between energy and time that sets a "quantum speed limit" on processes ranging from quantum computing and tunneling to optical switching. The speed limit, that is, the minimal time to transition between two easily distinguishable states, such as the north and south poles representing up and down states of a quantum spin (top), is characterized by a well-known relationship.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.01.2015
Rare neurological disease shines light on health of essential nerve cells
Ian Duncan is a Scotsman with the iron discipline and stamina of a competitive marathoner, triathlete and cross-country skier.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.01.2015
Trust your gut: E. coli may hold one of the keys to treating Parkinson's
Trust your gut: E. coli may hold one of the keys to treating Parkinson’s
ANN ARBOR-E. coli usually brings to mind food poisoning and beach closures, but researchers recently discovered a protein in E. coli that inhibits the accumulation of potentially toxic amyloids-a hallmark of diseases such as Parkinson's. Amyloids are formed by proteins that misfold and group together, and when amyloids assemble at the wrong place or time, they can damage brain tissue and cause cell death, according to Marger
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
22.01.2015
Exotic, giantic molecules fit inside each other like Russian nesting dolls
University of Chicago scientists have experimentally observed for the first time a phenomenon in ultracold, three-atom molecules predicted by Russian theoretical physicsist Vitaly Efimov in 1970. In this quantum phenomenon, called geometric scaling, the triatomic molecules fit inside one another like an infinitely large set of Russian nesting dolls.
Environmental Sciences - Astronomy
22.01.2015
Scientists team with indigenous people to study carbon in Amazon rainforest
Scientists team with indigenous people to study carbon in Amazon rainforest
By teaching basic ecology field work techniques to indigenous groups in the Amazon, Stanford researchers have found that satellite measurements of rainforests in the area underestimate the region's carbon storage potential. When it comes to measuring the carbon storage potential of the Amazon forest, indigenous people might outperform sophisticated satellites.
Environmental Sciences
22.01.2015
California's Policies Can Significantly Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions through 2030
California’s Policies Can Significantly Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions through 2030
A new model of the impact of California's existing and proposed policies on its greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goals suggests that the state is on track to meet 2020 goals, and could achieve greater emission reductions by 2030, but the state will need to do more to reach its 2050 climate goals.
Earth Sciences - Astronomy
22.01.2015
Mysteries in Nili Fossae
These new images from the high-resolution stereo camera on ESA's Mars Express show Nili Fossae, one of the most enticing regions on Mars.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
22.01.2015
Brookings Tops List of Penn’s 2014 Global Go To Think Tank Index Rankings
The increase in Medicaid reimbursement for primary care providers, a key provision of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), was associated with a 7.7 percentage points increase in new patient appointment availability without longer wait times, according to results of a new 10-state study - co-authored by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the Urban Institute, and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - published online-first by the New England Journal of Medicine .
Philosophy - Social Sciences
22.01.2015
Is cheating on the field worse than cheating on a spouse? Some fans think so
Is cheating on the field worse than cheating on a spouse? Some fans think so
ANN ARBOR-Why did fans and sponsors such as Nike drop Lance Armstrong but stay loyal to Tiger Woods? Probably because Armstrong's doping scandal took place on the field, unlike Wood's off-the-field extramarital affairs, according to new studies.
Astronomy - Social Sciences
22.01.2015
Black hole on a diet creates a 'changing look' quasar
Yale University astronomers have identified the first "changing look" quasar, a gleaming object in deep space that appears to have its own dimmer switch. The discovery may offer a glimpse into the life story of the universe's great beacons. Quasars are massive, luminous objects that draw their energy from black holes.
Administration/Government - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.01.2015
New program reduces hospitalizations for youth with psychosis
New program reduces hospitalizations for youth with psychosis
Providing coordinated care to young people who experience their first psychotic episode reduces hospitalization costs and helps patients continue to work and go to school, according to a new study scheduled to appear online Feb.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Astronomy
22.01.2015
UCLA and CASIS to collaborate on International Space Station study of possible therapy for bone loss
NASA A study of rodents on the International Space Station will allow astronauts to test the ability of a bone-forming molecule to direct stem cells to induce bone formation.
Environmental Sciences - Business/Economics
22.01.2015
Boston’s leaky pipes release high levels of heat-trapping methane
Harvard-led study reveals aging natural gas distribution system short-changes customers, contributes to greenhouse gas buildup - Imagine if every time you filled your car with gas, a few gallons didn't make it into the tank and instead spilled onto the ground.
Environmental Sciences
22.01.2015
UQ staff save cash and carbon with energy competition
University of Queensland staff have collectively prevented 77 tonnes of carbon emissions and saved $7600 in electricity costs during a three-week competition aimed at reducing energy consumption in laboratories.
Social Sciences
22.01.2015
Retreating from Darfur? A decade on, spectre of atrocities returns
By Phil Orchard News media have been reporting widespread atrocities by Boko Haram against as many as 2000 civilians in Nigeria.
Medicine/Pharmacology
21.01.2015
Novartis announces FDA approval for first IL-17A antagonist Cosentyx(TM) (secukinumab) for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis patients
Offering a new treatment option for patients, Cosentyx is the first approved human monoclonal antibody (mAb) that selectively binds to interleukin IL-17A , Phase III data demonstrated Cosentyx resulted in clear or almost clear skin in the majority of patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis Approval based on the efficacy and safety outcomes from 10 Phase II and III studies which included over 3,990 adult patients with mo
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
21.01.2015
Death of a dynamo - a hard drive from space
Hidden magnetic messages contained within ancient meteorites are providing a unique window into the processes that shaped our solar system, and may give a sneak preview of the fate of the Earth's core as it continues to freeze.
Astronomy
21.01.2015
SPIDER Experiment Touches Down in Antarctica
SPIDER Experiment Touches Down in Antarctica
After spending 16 days suspended from a giant helium balloon floating 115,000 feet above Antarctica, a scientific instrument dubbed SPIDER has landed in a remote region of the frozen continent.
Astronomy
21.01.2015
Let there be light
ESA Space in Images Title ESA's Optical Ground Station laser tags ISS Released 21/01/2015 3:21 pm Copyright Victor R. Ruiz Description The future of space
Literature/Linguistics - Life Sciences
21.01.2015
Chinese Academy of Sciences and EPFL Renew Agreement in Davos
Chinese Academy of Sciences and EPFL Renew Agreement in Davos
The agreement signed in 2010 between the Chinese Academy of Sciences and EPFL was renewed yesterday, a few hours before the WEF opening ceremony in Davos, in the presence of Chinese Premier Li Keqi
Business/Economics
21.01.2015
Doing it for the team: Business study tests motivational techniques
Every year, U.S. companies spend billions on incentives for salespeople, and although incentives can help boost sales figures, the associated costs cut into the bottom line in a big way.
Medicine/Pharmacology
21.01.2015
New drug compounds show promise against endometriosis
An interdisciplinary research team developed a new approach to treating endometriosis. The team includes, clockwise, from back left: molecular and integrative physiology professor Milan Bagchi, chemistry professor John Katzenellenbogen, visiting research scientist Ping Gong, molecular and integrative physiology professor Benita Katzenellenbogen, postdoctoral fellow Yiru Chen, research scientist Yuechao Zhao, and comparative biosciences professor CheMyong Ko.
History/Archeology - Administration/Government
21.01.2015
Exploiting sports triumphs for political gain a classic tale, scholar demonstrates
Reed Hutchinson/UCLA In a new book, classics professor Kathryn Morgan examines the tactics of Hieron, an ambitious ruler who trumpeted his horses' victories at the horse track and chariot races to gain political power.
Arts and Design - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.01.2015
Sharing the Secret to ‘Results’
Alumnus Sam Daley-Harris shared his journey from musician to global activist during his Distinguished Alumni Lecture.
Pedagogy/Education Science
21.01.2015
We must scrap new baseline tests for primary school children
Cathy Nutbrown, Professor of Education and Head of the School of Education at the University of Sheffield comments on the planned reintroduction of baseline assessment.
Careers/Employment - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.01.2015
Why sickness absence policies at work need to be reformed
Part-time sick pay is needed for employees with fluctuating health conditions, say researchers.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
21.01.2015
Got charisma? Look for it in your voice
Kenjo-Baptiste OIKAWA/Wikimedia Commons In examining the vocal style of former President of France Nicolas Sarkozy, UCLA voice scholar Rosario Signorello found characteristics that convey dominance and contrast with that of his successor, President Francois Hollande.
Administration/Government
21.01.2015
Ithaca mayor: Perspective moves us from fear to hope
Ithaca mayor: Perspective moves us from fear to hope
In a talk about hope, City of Ithaca Mayor Svante Myrick '09 shared his thoughts first about fear. Fear is "the largest obstacle any of us can face - any community can face, any individual, any family," he said Jan.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
21.01.2015
New worldwide estimates for herpes simplex virus type 2 published
New global estimates for herpes simplex virus type 2 show that over 400-million people worldwide were infected with the virus in 2012. The estimates underline the extent to which herpes simplex virus type 2 - the virus which causes genital herpes - is widespread throughout the world causing a significant burden of disease.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.01.2015
Synthetic amino acid enables safe, new biotechnology solutions to global problems
Scientists from Yale have devised a way to ensure genetically modified organisms (GMOs) can be safely confined in the environment, overcoming a major obstacle to widespread use of GMOs in agriculture, energy production, waste management, and medicine.
Careers/Employment - Administration/Government
21.01.2015
Sanctions linked to drop in benefits but few return to work report
The government's imposition of sanctions on Jobseeker's Allowance claimants has led to a significant rise in people leaving unemployment benefits, but they are not returning to work, according to researchers at the University of Oxford and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Sanctions are used to punish claimants who do not meet government conditions for actively seeking work and result in claimants having their benefit payments cut for a minimum of four weeks.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
21.01.2015
Cosmic radio burst caught red-handed
A team of astronomers using twelve telescopes from around the world, and in space, have for the first time captured a 'fast radio burst' happening live. The achievement will help scientists trap more bursts in the future, which could offer insight into the evolution of the universe. University of Manchester academics working from Jodrell Bank were members of the team, led by Emily Petroff from the Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia, that captured the burst using the Parkes radio telescope located in eastern Australia.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.01.2015
Ebola becomes lethal as it spreads
Ebola becomes lethal as it spreads
Researchers from the University of Liverpool, in collaboration with Public Health England, have determined why Ebola virus becomes increasingly lethal as it jumps species.    Scientists investigated why Ebola virus is so deadly when it spreads from animals to humans and then from human-to-human.  The research team looked at the Zaire Ebola strain in an animal system to understand how it gains strength.
Social Sciences - Literature/Linguistics
21.01.2015
First edited volume of Burns’s prose reveals new details about Scottish tours
Researchers have created the most complete mapping of the route that Robert Burns took on his famous tours of the Borders, Highland, and Lowland Scotland. It has been published as part of a major new edition of the Bard's prose work, the first time that Burns's complete writings have been made available to the public in fully annotated and edited form.
Life Sciences
21.01.2015
Research in the News: Ribosomal motor crucial part of cellular protein factory
The ribosome is the protein-making "factory" within cells responsible for knitting together amino acids into polypeptide chains that form proteins.
Arts and Design
21.01.2015
Culture at King's at Davos
Deborah Bull, Director, Cultural Partnerships at King's College London will be amongst the world's top political and business leaders and intellectuals taking part in this year's annual World Economic Forum at Davos.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
21.01.2015
The AMA and Medicare: a love-hate relationship
The Australian Medical Association (AMA) has emerged from the recent brouhaha over the Abbott government's proposed Medicare reforms as both a winner in the protection of doctors' incomes and an apparent champion of the affordability of health care for patients.
Computer Science/Telecom - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
21.01.2015
Optimizing optimization algorithms
Optimization algorithms, which try to find the minimum values of mathematical functions, are everywhere in engineering.
Life Sciences - Environmental Sciences
21.01.2015
Farming in a Hot, Dry World
Penn State Eberly College of Science Professor Charles Anderson and his research team are looking to help farmers and crop breeders grow hardier plants to boost world food supplies.
Earth Sciences
20.01.2015
Sequestration on shaky ground
Carbon sequestration promises to address greenhouse-gas emissions by capturing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and injecting it deep below the Earth's surface, where it would permanently solidify into rock. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that current carbon-sequestration technologies may eliminate up to 90 percent of carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants.
Mathematics - Pedagogy/Education Science
20.01.2015
Software teaches computers to translate words to math
Software teaches computers to translate words to math
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. If Johnny has five apples and seven oranges, and he wants to share them with three of his friends, can a computer understand the text to figure out how many pieces of fruit each person gets?
Medicine/Pharmacology - Environmental Sciences
20.01.2015
Comment: Chimps and gorillas desperately need Ebola vaccine too – virus has wiped out a third of the
Meera Inglis, a PhD student in Conservation Policy at the University of Sheffield, comments on the threat posed by the Ebola virus to the great apes of Africa.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.01.2015
Alumna fights Ebola on the front lines in Liberia
Alumna fights Ebola on the front lines in Liberia
Beer encountered numerous infrastructural challenges in Liberia. Many of the major roads were muddy and filled with overloaded trucks that often got stuck, such as the one pictured, and caused massive traffic jams.
Astronomy - Administration/Government
20.01.2015
Winter tracking
ESA Space in Images Title Kiruna station Released 20/01/2015 3:17 pm Copyright ESA Description ESA's Kiruna station is located at Salmijärvi, 38 km east of Kiruna, in northern Sweden.
Environmental Sciences - Chemistry
20.01.2015
Scientists drilling first deep ice core at the South Pole
Scientists drilling first deep ice core at the South Pole
This winter, when many people's imaginations were fixed on the North Pole, a small group of scientists has been working on the other side of the planet.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
20.01.2015
Becoming an Expert: Sarah Nolan on analysis of clinical trials
Becoming an Expert: Sarah Nolan on analysis of clinical trials
Sarah Nolan is a Research Assistant at the University of Liverpool's Institute of Translational Medicine , and part time PhD student focused on medical decision making.
Social Sciences - Administration/Government
20.01.2015
Cornell Perspectives: Wingman 101 shifts violence discussion
Cornell Perspectives: Wingman 101 shifts violence discussion
What's being done at Cornell to address sexual violence? A series of articles will present firsthand accounts from those who are on the front lines of the issue in our community.
Astronomy
20.01.2015
Computer Science/Telecom - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
20.01.2015
UW computer scientists enhance robotic manufacturing
Baxter, introduced in 2012 by the company Rethink Robotics, is a two-armed robot with a tablet-like panel for its "eyes." Photo: Rethink Robotics, Inc.
Life Sciences - Environmental Sciences
20.01.2015
Screening Plants for Potential Natural Products the New Fashioned Way
Screening Plants for Potential Natural Products the New Fashioned Way
Humans have been making use of plants for as long as there have been humans and plants. The actual cultivation of plants for food and other products began with the Neolithic Revolution some 12,000 years ago and has been evolving ever since.
Environmental Sciences - Earth Sciences
20.01.2015
Greenland ice: The warmer it gets the faster it melts
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Melting of glacial ice will probably raise sea level around the globe, but how fast this melting will happen is uncertain.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
20.01.2015
Particles accelerate without a push
Some physical principles have been considered immutable since the time of Isaac Newton: Light always travels in straight lines. No physical object can change its speed unless some outside force acts on it. Not so fast, says a new generation of physicists: While the underlying physical laws haven't changed, new ways of "tricking" those laws to permit seemingly impossible actions have begun to appear.
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences
20.01.2015
Unlocking the mystery of how cells in the body function
Unlocking the mystery of how cells in the body function
New drugs for diseases like cystic fibrosis could be developed following a £1.5m grant to a research team led by Lancaster University Physicists and biologists are to work together to find out how our body's cells work at a fundamental level. The team are examining ion channels in biological cells, which are involved in the basic functioning of all forms of life.
Medicine/Pharmacology
20.01.2015
How your friends might help you avoid flu
A study of social networks has yielded clues about how best to improve vaccination rates for influenza. Researchers at Lancaster University found that people who have lots of friends should be prioritised for the ‘flu jab because they might influence others to get vaccinated too. Influenza is a global health problem, affecting 3 to 5 million people a year and causing fatalities among the very old, the very young, and those with existing medical conditions.
Astronomy
20.01.2015
Destination: Moon
ESA Space in Videos ESA Web-TV Title Destination: Moon Released 18/01/2015 Length 00:08:32 Language English Footage Type Documentary Copyright ESA
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.01.2015
Siemens and CHUV Create a Research Group at EPFL's Innovation Park
Siemens and CHUV Create a Research Group at EPFL's Innovation Park
Another large company installs itself on EPFL's campus. Today, Siemens Healthcare, leader in medical technology, and the medical radiology department of the CHUV inaugurated their new facilities hosting a group of scientists in medical imaging. This unique research unit is collaborating with HUG, CIBM and EPFL.
Administration/Government
20.01.2015
Democracy Day: What the experts say
Democracy Day: What the experts say
Today (20 January 2015) is Democracy Day and 2015 marks the 750th anniversary of the first parliament of elected representatives at Westminster.
Study of Religions - History/Archeology
20.01.2015
Expert adviser: how I played the historical guessing game of adapting Wolf Hall
Dr Catherine Fletcher from the University of Sheffield's Department of History comments on her role as advisor to the BBC's forthcoming version of Wolf Hall.
Agronomy/Food Science - Psychology
20.01.2015
Current nutrition labeling is hard to digest
Current government-mandated nutrition labeling is ineffective in improving nutrition, but there is a better system available, according to a study by McGill University researchers published in the December issue of the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.
Environmental Sciences - Social Sciences
20.01.2015
MIT-USAID program releases pioneering evaluation of solar lanterns
MIT-USAID program releases pioneering evaluation of solar lanterns
When a person lives on less than $2 a day - as some 2.7 billion people around the world do - there isn't room for a product like a solar lantern or a water filter to fail.
Pedagogy/Education Science - Social Sciences
20.01.2015
Poorer parents are just as involved in their children’s activities as better-off parents
Poorer parents are just as involved in education, leisure, and sports activities with their children as better-off parents, a new study involving University of Bristol academics has found. Dr Esther Dermott and Marco Pomati analysed survey data on 1,665 UK households and found that poorer parents were as likely to have helped with homework, attended parents' evenings, and played sports or games with their children in the previous week.
Life Sciences - Environmental Sciences
20.01.2015
Predators, parasites, pests and the paradox of biological control
Predators, parasites, pests and the paradox of biological control
ANN ARBOR-When a bird swoops down and grabs a caterpillar devouring your backyard garden, you might view it as a clear victory for natural pest control. But what if that caterpillar is infected with larvae from a tiny parasitic wasp-another agent of biological pest control. Who should you root for now, the bird or the wasp? A new study from University of Michigan researchers suggests that the gardener should cheer for both of them or, more precisely, for the struggle between the predator and the parasite.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
20.01.2015
A very personal perspective on Dengue fever
Leah Katzelnick was all set for a career as an anthropologist until she contracted dengue fever. She was in hospital for a week with severe symptoms.
Environmental Sciences - Earth Sciences
20.01.2015
Greenland plays important role in polar ice research
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Melting of glacial ice will probably raise the sea level around the globe, but how fast this melting will happen is uncertain.
Administration/Government - Social Sciences
20.01.2015
Dealing with defence: the problems with a military covenant
By Cate Carter The ANZAC centenary will be full of symbols. After all, commemoration is cheaper than defence.
Media Sciences/Political Sciences - Social Sciences
20.01.2015
UQ experts help voters find their direction
More than 60,000 people have explored their political options through Vote Compass, a joint project by the ABC, Vox Pop Labs and the University of Queensland. Vote Compass is an online democratic engagement tool that allows people to work out where their views sit on the political spectrum and in relationship to the major political parties.
Environmental Sciences - Life Sciences
20.01.2015
Saving the little Aussie battler
Efforts to save the koala should focus on the availability of habitat and food resources under a changing climate, according to a University of Queensland researcher.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Environmental Sciences
19.01.2015
Study sheds light on links between diseases of dogs and big cats
Study sheds light on links between diseases of dogs and big cats
A new study of Serengeti lions addresses key questions about the spread of canine distemper virus (CDV) from domestic dogs and evaluates the effectiveness of dog vaccination efforts in protecting dogs and lions against the disease. CDV most commonly infects domestic dogs and other canines, but it can also affect species such as skunks, raccoons and is a threat to big cats such as lions and tigers.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.01.2015
Carnegie Mellon President Subra Suresh, Researchers Develop New Way To Model Sickle Cell Behavior
Carnegie Mellon President Subra Suresh, Researchers Develop New Way To Model Sickle Cell Behavior-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University A multidisciplinary research team, led by Carnegie Mellon University President Subra Suresh , has developed a novel microfluidic device to assess cell-level processes influencing the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD), an inherited genetic disorder.
Astronomy - Environmental Sciences
19.01.2015
An ecosystem in a box
An unusual package was delivered to a hotel in Beijing, China, in 1987 containing a batch of blue-green algae that would spend five days in space in a capsule.
Earth Sciences
19.01.2015
Geophysicists find the crusty culprits behind sudden tectonic plate movements
Yale-led research may have solved one of the biggest mysteries in geology - namely, why do tectonic plates beneath the Earth's surface, which normally shift over the course of tens to hundreds of millions of years, sometimes move abruptly? A new study published Jan. 19 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says the answer comes down to two things: thick crustal plugs and weakened mineral grains.
Life Sciences - Earth Sciences
19.01.2015
Fossil ankles indicate Earth’s earliest primates lived in trees
Earth's earliest primates have taken a step up in the world, now that researchers have gotten a good look at their ankles. A new study has found that Purgatorius , a small mammal that lived on a diet of fruit and insects, was a tree dweller. Paleontologists made the discovery by analyzing 65-million-year-old ankle bones collected from sites in northeastern Montana.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
19.01.2015
New laser could upgrade the images in tomorrow’s technology
A new semiconductor laser developed at Yale has the potential to significantly improve the imaging quality of the next generation of high-tech microscopes, laser projectors, photo lithography, holography, and biomedical imaging. Based on a chaotic cavity laser, the technology combines the brightness of traditional lasers with the lower image corruption of light emitting diodes (LEDs).
History/Archeology - Arts and Design
19.01.2015
Art Historian Reveals the Elizabethan Selfie-Addict
As 2014, the proclaimed year of the ‘selfie' comes to a close, a new book by Dr Elizabeth Goldring of the University of Warwick reveals Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, as the Elizabethan equivalent of a selfie-addict.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.01.2015
Know your enemy: Combating whooping cough requires informed vaccine booster schedules
ANN ARBOR-A key to victory in battle, according to Chinese general and military strategist Sun Tzu, is to know your enemy.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.01.2015
Bed nets and vaccines: Some combinations may worsen malaria
Bed nets and vaccines: Some combinations may worsen malaria
ANN ARBOR-Combining insecticide-treated bed nets with vaccines and other control measures may provide the best chance at eliminating malaria, which killed nearly 600,000 people worldwide in 2013, most of them African children. More than 20 malaria vaccine candidates are in different stages of development, but none are licensed for use.
Social Sciences - Administration/Government
19.01.2015
Understanding conflict is the road to peace, prosperity, Stanford scholar says
The Empirical Studies of Conflict project focuses on the causes and characteristics of politically motivated violence.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
19.01.2015
Perovskites provide big boost to silicon solar cells, Stanford study finds
Perovskites provide big boost to silicon solar cells, Stanford study finds
Putting a film of the crystalline material perovskite on top of a silicon solar cell increases the cell's efficiency nearly 50 percent, say Stanford scientists. Stacking perovskites, a crystalline material, onto a conventional silicon solar cell dramatically improves the overall efficiency of the cell, according to a new study led by Stanford University scientists.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
19.01.2015
Engineers use brilliant X-rays to illuminate catalysis, revise theories
Engineers use brilliant X-rays to illuminate catalysis, revise theories
Using high-brilliance X-rays in a new way, Stanford engineers observed electrons at work during catalytic reactions. Their findings challenge long-held theories about some catalysts, opening the door to new or improved renewable energy applications. Many of today's most promising renewable energy technologies – fuel cells, water splitters and artificial photosynthesis – rely upon catalysts to expedite the chemical reactions at the heart of their potential.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.01.2015
New way to model sickle cell behavior
Patients with sickle cell disease often suffer from painful attacks known as vaso-occlusive crises, during which their sickle-shaped blood cells get stuck in tiny capillaries, depriving tissues of needed oxygen. Blood transfusions can sometimes prevent such attacks, but there are currently no good ways to predict when a vaso-occlusive crisis, which can last for several days, is imminent.
Arts and Design
19.01.2015
Never Mind Mrs Brown’s Boys, a 5th Century BC Play Shows Cross-Dressing Comedy Stands the Test of Time
Classics students at the University of Warwick will perform a brand new translation of an Aristophanes' satire Thesmophoriazusae at Warwick Arts Centre later this month.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
19.01.2015
A stormy shape-shifter
ESA Space in Images Title Venus Express snaps swirling vortex Released 19/01/2015 1:51 pm Copyright ESA/VIRTIS/INAF-IASF/Obs.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
19.01.2015
Scientists use
Scientists use "pen and ink" to control how materials interact with light
Threatened with extinction by biros and computers, the nib pen could be set to make an unexpected comeback in the field of nanotechnology. Scientists at Imperial College London have developed a way to manipulate the optical properties of polymers on a tiny scale by drawing patterns with a solvent “ink”, allowing much more precise control over how these materials interact with light.
Pedagogy/Education Science - Social Sciences
19.01.2015
"You need to ignore it, babe": how mothers prepare young children for the reality of racism
Research among mothers with young children living in multicultural London shows that racism is a reality for children as young as five - and that many mothers adopt parenting strategies to help their children deal with it.  It is clear that increased diversity in the UK has encouraged families to adapt their parenting strategies.
Life Sciences - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
19.01.2015
New fibers can deliver many simultaneous stimuli
New fibers can deliver many simultaneous stimuli
The human brain's complexity makes it extremely challenging to study - not only because of its sheer size, but also because of the variety of signaling methods it uses simultaneously.
Business/Economics
19.01.2015
Having right look helps certain leaders reach the top
Leaders in certain fields are being selected in part because their face fits the stereotype of their profession, suggests new research.
Medicine/Pharmacology
19.01.2015
Daily quiet time to improve new mothers’ health
A quiet time scheduled every afternoon could improve the health of newborns and mothers in maternity wards according to researchers at McGill University.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.01.2015
Novartis Cosentyx(TM) is the first IL-17 inhibitor to receive EU approval for first-line treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis patients
Cosentyx is the only biologic that can be used as first-line systemic therapy in the treatment of psoriasis and as an alternative to treatments that have significant side effects ; all other biologics are recommended for second-line therapy[2-4] Cosentyx showed superiority to Stelara in the Phase IIIb CLEAR study In Phase III studies, 70% or more Cosentyx 300 mg patients achieved clear skin (PASI 100) or almost clear sk
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.01.2015
To beet or not to beet? Researchers test theories of beet juice benefits
Endurance athletes have been known to consume the crimson supplement based on the belief that it may improve blood and oxygen flow in their muscles during training and competition. UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Athletes who down beet juice before exercising to increase blood flow and improve performance may be surprised at the results of a recent study conducted at Penn State's Noll Laboratory.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
19.01.2015
Graphene multiplies the power of light
Graphene multiplies the power of light
Could graphene turn light to electricity? Scientists have shown that graphene can convert a single photon into multiple electrons, showing much promise for future photovoltaic devices. Graphene is a material that has gathered tremendous popularity in recent years, due to its extraordinary strength and light weight.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.01.2015
King's College London signs licence agreement with UCB in immunology and type 1 diabetes
King's College London announced that it has entered an exclusive licence agreement with UCB that grants the company the rights to develop a peptide-based immunotherapy programme for type 1 diabetes. This Phase-1 ready programme emerges from technology developed by Mark Peakman, Professor of Clinical Immunology at King's, with funding from the Wellcome Trust.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
19.01.2015
Pest resistance to GM crops likely to develop quicker than expected
Pest resistance to GM crops likely to develop quicker than expected
Pest resistance to GM crops likely to develop quicker than expected Over-estimating the pest-control abilities of genetically modified (GM) crops is leading to poor crop management, researchers at the universities of Sussex and Arizona have cautioned. The scientists argue that computer-generated models used by biotech companies fail to give realistic predictions about how quickly insects adapt to crops that have been genetically engineered to produce multiple toxins that target pests.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
19.01.2015
The Liverpool View: Blue Monday – a pseudoscience?
The Liverpool View: Blue Monday – a pseudoscience?
Professor Peter Kinderman is Head of the University of Liverpool's Institute of Psychology, Health and Society "Many things contribute to our well-being, but many things also make us miserable.
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
19.01.2015
India-Australia trade push another win for bilateralism
By Sunil Venaik and Paul Brewer Australia's trade mission to India under Andrew Robb last week provided a much-needed impetus to conclude an Australia-India free trade agreement in 2015.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
19.01.2015
Aboriginal women lead change prevent high rates of fetal alcohol syndrome in remote Australia
One in eight children born in 2002 or 2003 and living in remote Fitzroy Valley communities in Western Australia have Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, a landmark study reveals in today's Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health.
Social Sciences
16.01.2015
UChicago Crime Lab event tackles challenges of life after prison
Nationally, more than 2 million people are in prison. That number should be shocking but has become normal over the past few decades; since the 1970s, the U.S. incarceration rate has increased by 450 percent.
Business/Economics - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
16.01.2015
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
16.01.2015
Labiaplasty and porn - Don't believe the hype  »
Preliminary research into the relationship between pornography and genital satisfaction has found women are generally content and were not considering drastic cosmetic surgery to their genitals. The findings contradict the popular belief about the increasing incidence of labiaplasty, and the theory that pornography is the main driver of surgery.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
16.01.2015
Planetary building blocks evolved from porous to hard objects
Thinking small has enabled an international team of scientists to gain new insight into the evolution of planetary building blocks in the early solar system. The researchers compared the results of small-scale numerical simulations of colliding rock and dust particles to the composition of meteorites.
Event
16.01.2015
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
16.01.2015
Scientists tame Schr dinger's cat for a new type of quantum computer
Scientists tame Schr dinger’s cat for a new type of quantum computer
Sussex scientists tame Schr?dinger's cat for a new type of quantum computer Physicists at the University of Sussex have tamed one of the most counterintuitive phenomena of modern science in the
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.01.2015
Picture this - biosecurity seen from the inside
When plants come under attack internal alarm bells ring and their defence mechanisms swing into action – and it happens in the space of just a few minutes.
Environmental Sciences - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
16.01.2015
Smackdown's upside nets $23,000 in energy savings
Smackdown's upside nets $23,000 in energy savings
Striving to become greener than ever, Martha Van Rensselaer Hall West and the residential complex Court-Kay-Bauer and Mews halls won their respective electricity saving contests in the Energy Smackdown, held Nov.
Social Sciences
16.01.2015
Women waging peace
Thousands of Jewishand Palestinian-Israeli women have joined a movement that is spreading across Israel in opposition to repeated cycles of violence in Gaza.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.01.2015
Is it possible to reset our biological clocks?
Imagine being able to easily get over all of the discomfort and problems of jet lag or night-shift work. Science is not quite there, but recent work by Marc Cuesta, Nicolas Cermakian and Diane B. Boivin from the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University has opened new therapeutic avenues for improving the synchronization of the body's different biological clocks.
Earth Sciences - Environmental Sciences
16.01.2015
Atmospheric Rivers, Cloud-Creating Aerosol Particles, and California Reservoirs
In the midst of the California rainy season, scientists are embarking on a field campaign designed to improve the understanding of the natural and human-caused phenomena that determine when and how the state gets its precipitation. They will do so by studying atmospheric rivers, meteorological events that include the famous rainmaker known as the Pineapple Express.
Environmental Sciences - Business/Economics
16.01.2015
U-M study details costs, environmental impact of raising Michigan’s Renewable Portfolio Standard
ANN ARBOR-A new University of Michigan study analyzes the real impacts of raising Michigan's Renewable Portfolio Standard-the policy mandating the percentage of the state's electric generation capacity that must be provided by renewable power.
Computer Science/Telecom - Mathematics
16.01.2015
New research project funded by Department of Defense will enable faster, better coding
Pictured from left to right are UW-Madison computer sciences Professor Tom Reps, graduate students Jason Breck and David Bingham Brown, and Professor Ben Liblit.
Environmental Sciences - Arts and Design
16.01.2015
Stirbitch: mapping the unmappable
Dr Michael Hrebeniak describes himself as inveterately curious.
Architecture
16.01.2015
Timber project to explore Shropshire’s medieval heritage
A group of ancient timber-framed buildings in a North Shropshire village will be studied as part of a local history project led by Dr George Nash, Visiting Fellow at the University of Bristol, and villager Alastair Reid.
Law/Forensics
16.01.2015
Comment: Hard Evidence: does door-to-door campaigning work?
Charles Pattie, Professor of Geography at the University of Sheffield, comments on whether door-to-door campaigning works. by Professor Charles Pattie, 16 January 2015, posted on The Conversation With the 2015 General Election set for May 7, Britain's political parties have lost no time in stepping up their campaign activities.
Environmental Sciences - Life Sciences
16.01.2015
The industrial revolution of the oceans will imperil wildlife, says Stanford scientist
The industrial revolution of the oceans will imperil wildlife, says Stanford scientist
In a new report, Steve Palumbi and colleagues show that the industrialization of the oceans mirrors the early stages of activities that have triggered mass extinctions on land.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
16.01.2015
Comment: How to avoid bogus health information on the web
Andy Tattersall, an information specialist at the University of Sheffield, comments on how to avoid bogus health information on the Internet.
Astronomy - Business/Economics
16.01.2015
Beagle-2 lander found on Mars
The UK-led Beagle-2 Mars lander, which hitched a ride on ESA's Mars Express mission and was lost on Mars since 2003, has been found in images taken by a NASA orbiter at the Red Planet.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
16.01.2015
Solving an Organic Semiconductor Mystery
Solving an Organic Semiconductor Mystery
Organic semiconductors are prized for light emitting diodes (LEDs), field effect transistors (FETs) and photovoltaic cells. As they can be printed from solution, they provide a highly scalable, cost-effective alternative to silicon-based devices. Uneven performances, however, have been a persistent problem.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
16.01.2015
How does a machine smell? Better than it did
Scientists have come up with a way of creating sensors which could allow machines to smell more accurately humans. Every odour has its own specific pattern which our noses are able to identify. Using a combination of proteins coupled to transistors, for the first time machines are able to differentiate smells that are mirror images of each other, so called chiral molecules, something that has not been possible before.
Astronomy
16.01.2015
Green Caspian
ESA Space in Images Title Caspian Sea Released 16/01/2015 10:00 am Copyright KARI/ESA Description A shoreline of the northeastern Caspian Sea is pictured in this satellite image.
Astronomy
16.01.2015
Rejigging the Cluster quartet
Aiming to study Earth's 'bow shock' in the solar wind, the constellation of Cluster satellites is being rejigged to bring two of the four to within almost touching distance.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.01.2015
New network faculty studies long-term biological consequences of childhood abuse
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Christine Heim, professor of biobehavioral health at Penn State, studies the neurobiological effects that childhood maltreatment has on the development of psychiatric disorders and physical health outcomes. Heim joined the University's  Network on Child Protection and Well-Being last semester and conducts research focused on identifying mechanisms that mediate the effects of abuse on long-term health, which may lead to novel interventions.
Environmental Sciences
16.01.2015
Human activity puts Earth's systems at risk
Human activity puts Earth’s systems at risk
Four of the nine systems that regulate the interaction between land, ocean, atmosphere, ice-sheets and life on Earth are at risk from destabilisation due to human activity, according to an international team including UCL scientists.
Law/Forensics - Administration/Government
16.01.2015
Fundamental flaws in European justice for juvenile suspects
Study by University of Warwick finds major differences and crucial weaknesses in the treatment of youngsters across the EU. More specialist training is required for police, lawyers and judges involved in the interrogation of juvenile suspects across Europe, a researcher from the University of Warwick has found.
Astronomy - Computer Science/Telecom
16.01.2015
Galactic ’hailstorm’ in the early Universe
Astronomers have been able to peer back to the young Universe to determine how quasars - powered by supermassive black holes with the mass of a billion suns - form and shape the evolution of galaxies.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.01.2015
Dolphin hearts beat abnormally during deep-sea sprinting
Despite their remarkable adaptations to aquatic life, exercising while holding their breath remains a physiological challenge for marine mammals, finds an international study of dolphins and seals. The study found a surprisingly high frequency of cardiac arrhythmias in bottlenose dolphins and Weddell seals during the deepest dives.
Mathematics - Computer Science/Telecom
16.01.2015
Software that knows the risks
Imagine that you could tell your phone that you want to drive from your house in Boston to a hotel in upstate New York, that you want to stop for lunch at an Applebee's at about 12:30, and that you don't want the trip to take more than four hours.
Business/Economics
16.01.2015
Colourful solution to African communications challenges
A Brisbane researcher is harnessing colour-coding techniques to overcome barriers while working to improve summer crop productivity in Australia and Africa.
Environmental Sciences
16.01.2015
Map app reveals Australia’s cultural landscape
A new, free smartphone application offers a guide to the locations and landscapes that provide the backdrop for Australia's most-loved films, novels and plays.
History/Archeology
16.01.2015
Ask Alma's Owl: When Martin Luther King Jr. Spoke at Columbia
Dear Alma, I know that Martin Luther King Jr. spoke in New York a number of times. Did he ever come to Columbia? —Sixties Scholar Dear Scholar, On October 27, 1961, Martin Luther King Jr.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
16.01.2015
Faculty Experts Guide for 2015 Texas Legislative Session
As lawmakers convene to tackle complex issues for the state, experts at The University of Texas at Austin can provide rich commentary and insight based on years of research and work in the field.
Administration/Government - Literature/Linguistics
15.01.2015
A Blind Date with Science
M*A*S*H actor Alan Alda shows scientists on campus a better way to communicate with the public We've all seen them.
Pedagogy/Education Science
15.01.2015
Environmental Sciences
15.01.2015
Systems crucial to stability of planet compromised
Almost half of the processes that are crucial to maintaining the stability of the planet have become dangerously compromised by human activity. That is the view of an international team of 18 researchers who provide new evidence of significant changes in four of the nine systems which regulate the resilience of the Earth.
Social Sciences
15.01.2015
Study supports new explanation of gender gaps in academia
Psychology professor Andrei Cimpian and his colleagues found that the expectation that one must be brilliant to succeed in certain academic fields was associated with the underrepresentation of women in those fields. CHAMPAIGN, Ill. It isn't that women don't want to work long hours or can't compete in highly selective fields, and it isn't that they are less analytical than men, researchers report in a study of gender gaps in academia.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
15.01.2015
Team enlarges brain samples, making them easier to image
Beginning with the invention of the first microscope in the late 1500s, scientists have been trying to peer into preserved cells and tissues with ever-greater magnification. The latest generation of so-called "super-resolution" microscopes can see inside cells with resolution better than 250 nanometers.
History/Archeology
15.01.2015
Hands-on dad isn’t a new phenomenon
The 21st Century dad - as defined by celebrity fathers such as David Beckham, Brad Pitt and Jamie Oliver - isn't a new phenomenon, according to new research. Historians from the University of Leeds and Manchester examined fatherhood in Britain during the 19th and 20th centuries and found strong evidence that dads were much more involved in their children’s lives than previously recognised.
Earth Sciences
15.01.2015
UK’s first independent research to monitor fracking
Two University of Bristol academics are part of a UK consortium, led by the British Geological Survey (BGS), which will carry out research at two proposed hydraulic fracturing ('fracking') sites in Lancashire.
History/Archeology
15.01.2015
Hands-on dad isn’t a new phenomenon
The 21st Century dad – as defined by celebrity fathers such as David Beckham, Brad Pitt and Jamie Oliver – isn't a new phenomenon according to research from the universities of Manchester and Leeds. Historians examined fatherhood in Britain during the 19th and 20th centuries and found strong evidence that dads were much more involved in their children's lives than previously recognised.
Earth Sciences - Environmental Sciences
15.01.2015
What happens to rivers after earthquakes?
What happens to rivers after earthquakes?
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue. What happens to rivers after earthquakes? Large earthquakes can cause huge devastation in mountains by triggering landslides.
Chemistry
15.01.2015
Remaking the mould
ESA Space in Images Title Instrument housing produced with 3D printed mould Released 15/01/2015 10:10 am Copyright ESA-Anneke Le Floc'h Description 3D printing o
Medicine/Pharmacology - Literature/Linguistics
15.01.2015
Mosquitoes, malaria and Asian history
Chinese rulers spent hundreds of years and sacrificed countless lives building a meandering 5,500-mile earth, stone, and brick wall along the country's northern border, designed to keep invaders from attacking the empire.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.01.2015
Extra-short nanowires best for brain
Extra-short nanowires best for brain
If in the future electrodes are inserted into the human brain - either for research purposes or to treat diseases - it may be appropriate to give them a 'coat' of nanowires that could make them less irritating for the brain tissue.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.01.2015
UCL cancer immunotherapy company, Autolus, launches with £30m investment
UCL cancer immunotherapy company, Autolus, launches with £30m investment
A new UCL spin-out company - Autolus - is being launch today to develop and commercialise a new generation of engineered T-cell therapies for haematological and solid tumours, with the backing of £30m in investment from healthcare investment company Syncona.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.01.2015
High-fat diet triggers immune response in flies
A fat-heavy diet triggers an immune response that may lead to diabetes and other health problems, according to a study of fruit flies by the Centre for Molecular and Cellular Biology of Inflammation (CMCBI) at King's College London. A fat-rich diet has been linked to obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and a shortened lifespan in many species.
Life Sciences - Environmental Sciences
15.01.2015
Tiny plant fossils a window into Earth's landscape millions of years ago
Tiny plant fossils a window into Earth’s landscape millions of years ago
Minuscule, fossilized pieces of plants could tell a detailed story of what the Earth looked like 50 million years ago. An international team led by the University of Washington has discovered a way to determine the tree cover and density of trees, shrubs and bushes in locations over time based on clues in the cells of plant fossils preserved in rocks and soil.
Event - Environmental Sciences
15.01.2015
Obituaries for coral reefs may be premature, study finds
By John Pandolfi Coral reefs are the poster child for the damage people are doing to the world's oceans.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
14.01.2015
Chuck Feeney: Stanford's quiet change-maker
Chuck Feeney: Stanford’s quiet change-maker
Although you won't find his name anywhere on campus, Chuck Feeney is behind some of Stanford's most innovative facilities, from Campus Drive to the heart of the Medical Center.
Life Sciences - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
14.01.2015
Engineers develop a device for measuring how birds take flight
A new device invented by David Lentink will answer long-held questions about the forces birds generate while flying, and could lead to the development of innovative, efficient unmanned aerial vehicles. It's quite easy to look at a bird and deduce that it flies by flapping its wings, but understanding exactly how a bird generates lift has long eluded scientists.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
14.01.2015
Lack of exercise responsible for twice as many deaths as obesity
A brisk 20 minute walk each day could be enough to reduce an individual's risk of early death, according to new research published today. The study of over 334,000 European men and women found that twice as many deaths may be attributable to lack of physical activity compared with the number of deaths attributable to obesity, but that just a modest increase in physical activity could have significant health benefits.
Medicine/Pharmacology
14.01.2015
Penn Medicine Study: Endobronchial Forceps Effective in Retrieval of Tip-Embedded Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Filters
When retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters were approved for use in the United States in 2003 to prevent pulmonary embolism among patients unable to receive the standard blood thinner treatment, many experts anticipated most of them would be removed when no longer needed and IVC filter complications would decrease.
Social Sciences
14.01.2015
Researcher to discuss lives of older lesbians on Radio 4
Researcher to discuss lives of older lesbians on Radio 4
Sussex researcher to discuss lives of older lesbians on Radio 4 A University of Sussex researcher will be appearing on BBC Radio 4's ‘ Woman's Hour ' this Friday (16 January) to discuss the ‘invisibility' of older lesbians in both academic research and popular culture.
Physics/Materials Science - Literature/Linguistics
14.01.2015
Physics takes center stage in theater collaboration
Physics takes center stage in theater collaboration
A collaboration between Cornell and the Kitchen Theatre Company (KTC) has found a new way to make physics irresistible, with "Physics Fair," an original musical theater production.
Medicine/Pharmacology
14.01.2015
It's never too late for love, according to gerontology research
It’s never too late for love, according to gerontology research
Haven't found that perfect life partner? There's hope right into your 80s, according to a Cornell University gerontologist.
14.01.2015
Vega ready to launch spaceplane
On its first launch of the year, Europe's Vega rocket will loft ESA's unmanned spaceplane to test reentry technologies for future vehicles.
Environmental Sciences
14.01.2015
Comment: Haunting examination of class in America – Foxcatcher warns of the problems of privilege
David Forrest, Lecturer in Film Studies at the University of Sheffield, comments on why Bennett Miller's Foxcatcher deserves recognition.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
14.01.2015
Comment: From Hazardous Waists to Talkin’ Bol***ks: how comedy can be used for public health
John Mooney, a Public Health Specialist at the University of Sheffield, comments on how comedy can be used for public health.
Social Sciences - Literature/Linguistics
14.01.2015
Carnegie Mellon’s Miller Gallery Opens "From the Edge" Exhibition, Featuring Performance Design Depicting Social and Political Issues
Carnegie Mellon's Miller Gallery Opens "From the Edge" Exhibition, Featuring Performance Design Depicting Social and Political Issues-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University By Katie Ell
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
14.01.2015
Professor Chester S. Spatt Named to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s New Equity Market Structure Advisory Committee
Professor Chester S. Spatt Named to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's New Equity Market Structure Advisory Committee -Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University By Mark
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
14.01.2015
Chemical dial controls attraction between water-repelling molecules
Fear of water may seem like an irrational hindrance to humans, but on a molecular level, it lends order to the world. Some substances - lots of greasy, oily ones in particular - are hydrophobic. They have no attraction to water, and essentially appear repelled by the stuff. Combine hydrophobic pieces in a molecule with parts that are instead attracted to water, and sides are taken.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Computer Science/Telecom
14.01.2015
Self-driving cars: Lower-cost navigation system developed
Self-driving cars: Lower-cost navigation system developed
ANN ARBOR-A new software system developed at the University of Michigan uses video game technology to help solve one of the most daunting hurdles facing self-driving and automated cars-the high cost of the laser scanners they use to determine their location.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
14.01.2015
A twist on planetary origins
A twist on planetary origins
Meteors that have crashed to Earth have long been regarded as relics of the early solar system. These craggy chunks of metal and rock are studded with chondrules - tiny, glassy, spherical grains that were once molten droplets. Scientists have thought that chondrules represent early kernels of terrestrial planets: As the solar system started to coalesce, these molten droplets collided with bits of gas and dust to form larger planetary precursors.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
14.01.2015
Carbon nanotube finding could lead to flexible electronics with longer battery life
University of Wisconsin-Madison materials engineers have made a significant leap toward creating higher-performance electronics with improved battery life - and the ability to flex and stretch. Led by materials science Associate Professor Michael Arnold and Professor Padma Gopalan , the team has reported the highest-performing carbon nanotube transistors ever demonstrated.
Computer Science/Telecom - Mathematics
14.01.2015
Michael Mitzenmacher and Stuart Shieber named 2014 ACM Fellows
Michael Mitzenmacher and Stuart Shieber, faculty members at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), are among 47 leading computer scientists named 2014 Fellows of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).
Medicine/Pharmacology
14.01.2015
Yale YODA Project announces first availability of medical device trial data
The Yale University Open Data Access (YODA) Project is announcing the first-ever broad availability of clinical trial data for medical devices and diagnostics by a company.
Social Sciences - Business/Economics
14.01.2015
Rosario Dawson Headlines MLK Lecture in Social Justice at Penn Jan. 20
WHO: Rosario Dawson , actress, activist and humanitarian, co founder of Studio One-Eighty Nine Tiffany Persons , co-founder of Studio One Eighty Nine Abrima Erwiah , co-founder of Studi
History/Archeology - Literature/Linguistics
14.01.2015
Innovation and piracy in the 16th century: how the father of modern publishing invented intellectual property
Can an idea be owned, bought and sold? We think of intellectual property as a modern concept, but a new exhibition curated by an Oxford historian reveals that copyright disputes and the problem of piracy were in play at least five centuries ago.
Arts and Design - Literature/Linguistics
14.01.2015
Business/Economics - Administration/Government
14.01.2015
Research team examines new way of working in higher education
From left, are Jennifer Nicholas, Matt Raup, Leen Zaballero and Sohel Imroz, who are researching how higher-ed environments are being impacted as universities, such as Penn State, are shifting to more process-based work.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
14.01.2015
We need new antibiotics to beat superbugs, but why are they so hard to find?
By Matthew Cooper We've heard a lot lately about superbugs – bacteria that are resistant to current antibiotics. But as the threat of superbugs continues to rise, the number of new treatments available has flatlined. This has placed us dangerously close to the edge of a return to the pre-antibiotic era , when even simple infections caused death.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
14.01.2015