Wageningen University & Research


Wageningen University & Research   link
Location: Wageningen
6708 PB Wageningen
Environment - Oct 25

Longread Can minerals help extract the greenhouse gas CO2 from the air? PhD candidate Emily te Pas is investigating the potential of spreading crushed silicate minerals on agricultural land. 'This is still pioneering at this stage. It is important to collect data: does it work and is it safe?'' Photo above: Marcel van den Bergh At a testing site in Renkum, PhD candidate Emily te Pas is investigating whether the greenhouse gas CO2 can be extracted from the air by adding silicate minerals to agricultural soil.

Event - Oct 24

In the Connected Circularity programme, four research teams - within 4 Flagship projects - from Wageningen University & Research (WUR) have been working on HOW to shape the transition to a circular bioeconomy. That is an society in which organic material forms the basis of our food system and in which no more materials are wasted. In a series of podcasts, Sandra van Kampen questions the programme leads about their vision of the circular food system of the future. Today Hilke Bos-Brouwers on Circularity by design: how can we design a fully circular food system for Amsterdam in 2050?

Event - Oct 24

In the Connected Circularity programme, four research teams - within 4 Flagship projects - from Wageningen University & Research (WUR) have been working on HOW to shape the transition to a circular bioeconomy. That is an society in which organic material forms the basis of our food system and in which no more materials are wasted. In a series of podcasts, Sandra van Kampen questions the programme leads about their vision of the circular food system of the future. Today Hilke Bos-Brouwers on Circularity by design: how can we design a fully circular food system for Amsterdam in 2050?

Agronomy - Oct 19

How can we make food safety monitoring as effective as possible with the available resources? That is the question that the Chair of Food Safety Economics is tackling. This is the central topic of the inaugural address of special professor Ine van der Fels-Klerx on October 20, 2022. The title of her speech is: 'Integrating economics in food safety monitoring: what, where and how?'

Environment - Oct 18

The Living Planet Report published by WWF on 13 October shows well-documented evidence that humanity has far exceeded our planet's safe limits. The second part of the report offers the prospect of solutions. "We need to change the root causes of environmental degradation," state Francisco Alpizar and Jeanne Nel of Wageningen University & Research in their contribution to the report.

Economics - Oct 14

Informal businesses are crucial to secure people's access to food, which is an important Sustainable Development Goal. This is the conclusion of the recently published report Unpacking the informal midstream; how the informal economy can and should contribute to enhanced food system outcome, published by Wageningen University & Research. Conclusion: it is time to involve these informal businesses in plans to achieve Zero Hunger in 2030.

Environment - Oct 13

A new study by 33 orangutan experts from around the globe, amongst others professor Douglas Sheil, assessed what would happen to Bornean orangutans in the next decade under different management assumptions. The good news is that the researchers predict that if orangutan killing and habitat loss were stopped that orangutan populations could rebound and reach 148% of their current size by 2122. So, there is hope.

Life Sciences - Oct 13

Research Infrastructure for Food, Nutrition and Health blog - This blog was written by Jaap van der Meer and Saskia Visser The seas and oceans are considered as a great underutilized source of human food and some recent reports* suggest that marine food production can be increased substantially.

Life Sciences - Oct 24

Today, the Dutch government confirmed the allocation of ¤60 million to support an ecosystem for cellular agriculture, the technology to produce animal products, such as meat and milk proteins, directly from animal and microbial cells. It is the world's largest financial support ever for cellular agriculture by a national government. Wageningen University & Research is one of the consortium partners and will work on education and research.

Agronomy - Oct 20

Wageningen World The abrupt loss of cheap Ukrainian wheat rocked the world market, hitting poor consumers in Africa particularly hard.

Environment - Oct 19

It has long been known that humanity is exceeding planetary boundaries for nitrogen use. Scientists have now mapped those exceedances regionally for the first time. Whereas countries in north-western Europe and parts of India and China are emitting far too much nitrogen, there is actually room for intensification of nitrogen use across much of Africa and South America. The research was published today in the scientific journal Nature.

Environment - Oct 18

The Living Planet Report published by WWF on 13 October shows well-documented evidence that humanity has far exceeded our planet's safe limits. The second part of the report offers the prospect of solutions. "We need to change the root causes of environmental degradation," state Francisco Alpizar and Jeanne Nel of Wageningen University & Research in their contribution to the report.

Birdwatchers beware! The next few weeks are all about crane migration. When the wind is just right, sometimes thousands of "cranes" fly over the Netherlands. But even with those numbers, it is not easy to spot them. That is why Dr Koen de Koning, in collaboration with Sensing Clues, developed an app that works as a 'rainfall radar for cranes'. This makes spotting a lot easier.

Environment - Oct 13

Wageningen University & Research has been part of a global cross-disciplinary process to develop the first comprehensive classification of the world's ecosystems across land, rivers and wetlands, and seas. This ecosystem typology will enable more coordinated and effective biodiversity conservation, critical for human wellbeing.

Environment - Oct 12

Many plant species, probably including a third of all trees, are threatened by extinction. One of the growing threats is rapid climate change and the inability of plants to move rapidly enough, or cross barriers, to places where they can persist. This threat is particularly acute for species that live on or near cool mountain tops and have no opportunity to go ever higher as temperatures increase. A research team investigated the implication of climate change for the distribution of such species. They found that "gaps" in the forest may be key.




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