news 2021

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Results 2861 - 2880 of 3291.


Career - Economics / Business - 16.02.2021
How has the pandemic impacted our wellbeing?
New research from Professor Roger Gill, helps us to understand the impact of ongoing Covid-19 restrictions on mental health and wellbeing. The study, delivered in partnership with Professor Matt Grawitch and colleagues at St Louis University in Missouri, surveyed people living and working across the UK, France, Germany, Canada and the US.

Health - 16.02.2021
Researchers solve riddle of plant immune system
Team led by the University of Göttingen describes influence of molecular mechanisms How do plants build resilience? An international research team led by the University of Göttingen studied the molecular mechanisms of the plant immune system. They were able to show a connection between a relatively unknown gene and resistance to pathogens.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.02.2021
Targeted elimination of leukemic stem cells
Targeted elimination of leukemic stem cells
Cancer research has discovered a further mechanism to combat leukemia: a research team has succeeded in identifying an important signaling pathway for regulating leukemic stem cells. With this discovery, the researchers are expanding the arsenal of potentially highly effective drugs against leukemias ("blood cancers").

Health - Pharmacology - 16.02.2021
Higher Covid-19 risk for middle-aged people with type 2 diabetes
A large-scale analysis involving UCL and funded by Diabetes UK has found a disproportionately higher Covid-19 death risk in middle-aged people with type 2 diabetes, raising questions over vaccination strategies across Europe. The study, published in the journal Diabetologia , found that compared to people of a similar age without type 2 diabetes, the additional COVID-19 mortality risk from having type 2 diabetes increases the younger someone is.

Criminology / Forensics - 16.02.2021
Counterintuitive approach may improve eyewitness identification
Experts have devised a novel approach to selecting photos for police line-ups that helps witnesses identify culprits more reliably. In a paper published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , researchers - from the University of California San Diego and Duke University in the United States and the University of Birmingham in the U.K. show for the first time that selecting fillers who match a basic description of the suspect but whose faces are less similar, rather than more, leads to better outcomes than traditional approaches in the field.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.02.2021
Oxford-led technology to help those at high risk from COVID-19
Oxford-led technology to help those at high risk from COVID-19
Research led by Professor Julia Hippisley-Cox in the University of Oxford's Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, with collaborators across the UK, found that there are several health and personal factors which, when combined, could mean someone is at a higher risk from COVID-19. These include characteristics like age, ethnicity and BMI, as well as certain medical conditions and treatments.

Physics - Materials Science - 16.02.2021
A sharper look at the interior of semiconductors
A sharper look at the interior of semiconductors
A research team is developing a high-resolution imaging technique that can be used to investigate materials in a non-destructive manner and with nanometre precision Images provide information - what we can observe with our own eyes enables us to understand. Constantly expanding the field of perception into dimensions that are initially hidden from the naked eye, drives science forward.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.02.2021
Cloudy eyes caused by protein imbalance
Cloudy eyes caused by protein imbalance
Cataracts: new model explains origins of the eye condition Cataracts are the most common eye ailment in humans. However, the exact processes leading to this condition are not fully understood. A team of researchers headed by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered that the composition of the protein solution plays a decisive role.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.02.2021
Aging: What underlies the mitochondrial stress response
Aging: What underlies the mitochondrial stress response
Scientists at EPFL have discovered certain enzymes that play a central role in the stress responses that defend mitochondria from stress, and promote health and longevity. Probably the most well-known organelle of the cell, mitochondria play a critical role in producing energy from food. So, it's no surprise that mitochondria can get stressed and damaged.

Environment - Health - 16.02.2021
Drought restrictions had side benefit: Lowering risk of mosquito-borne disease
Shallow pools of water on lawns are ideal breeding grounds for the mosquitoes that transmit West Nile virus, the most common mosquito-borne disease in the United States. A new study by scientists from UCLA and three other universities found that reducing shallow pools of water where the insects lay their eggs is key to preventing the spread of the virus.

Life Sciences - Physics - 16.02.2021
Visualisation of 'dancing DNA'
Visualisation of ’dancing DNA’
Videos showing for the first time how small circles of DNA adopt dance-like movements inside a cell have been developed by researchers in Yorkshire. The footage, created by a team of scientists from the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York, and recorded at UCL, is based on the highest resolution images of a single molecule of DNA ever captured.

Politics - 16.02.2021
The Politics of Synonyms
Previous studies have shown people can identify the gender and race of a speaker based on the words chosen, but could a person identify something like political membership? A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found people are more successful at identifying language associated with Republican speech than Democratic speech patterns.

Life Sciences - 15.02.2021
Tropical paper wasps babysit for neighbours
Tropical paper wasps babysit for neighbours
Wasps provide crucial support to their extended families by babysitting at neighbouring nests, according to new research by a team of biologists from the universities of Bristol, Exeter and UCL published today [15 February] in Nature Ecology and Evolution. The findings suggest that animals should often seek to help more distant relatives if their closest kin are less in need.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.02.2021
Existing Heart Failure Drug May Treat Potential COVID-19 Long-Hauler Symptom
UC San Diego clinical trial suggests ivabradine may be effective in treating postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome In a new study out of University of California San Diego School of Medicine, researchers found a drug used for heart failure improves symptoms associated with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, otherwise known as POTS.

Life Sciences - 15.02.2021
New discovery at the IOR on mechanisms leading to the spread of metastases
New discovery at the IOR on mechanisms leading to the spread of metastases
Prostate cancer research is making further progress with a recent discovery of the Prostate Cancer Biology laboratory at the Institute of Oncology Research (IOR, affiliated to the Università della Svizzera Italiana). A study led by Dr  Giuseppina Carbone has revealed that micro-RNA fragments, released into the body by prostate cancer cells through microscopic vesicles called exosomes, lead to the formation of metastases.

Physics - Materials Science - 15.02.2021
The transforming power of light
A group of researchers from the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society and the Humboldt University of Berlin have found out that semiconductors can be converted to metals and back more easily and more quickly than previously thought. This discovery may increase the processing speed and simplify the design of many common technological devices.

Physics - Electroengineering - 15.02.2021
Kagome graphene promises exciting properties
Kagome graphene promises exciting properties
For the first time, physicists from the University of Basel have produced a graphene compound consisting of carbon atoms and a small number of nitrogen atoms in a regular grid of hexagons and triangles. This honeycomb-structured -kagome lattice- behaves as a semiconductor and may also have unusual electrical properties.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.02.2021
Regular caffeine consumption affects brain structure
Regular caffeine consumption affects brain structure
Coffee, cola or an energy drink: caffeine is the world's most widely consumed psychoactive substance. Researchers from the University of Basel have now shown in a study that regular caffeine intake can change the gray matter of the brain. However, the effect appears to be temporary. No question - caffeine helps most of us to feel more alert.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.02.2021
Signs of burnout can be detected in sweat
Signs of burnout can be detected in sweat
EPFL engineers, working in association with startup Xsensio, have developed a wearable system that can measure the concentration of cortisol - the stress hormone - in human sweat. Enabling future quasi-continuous monitoring, their device can eventually help doctors better understand and treat stress-related conditions like burnout and obesity.

Environment - 15.02.2021
Record sunshine during first COVID-19 lockdown largely caused by unusual weather
Exceptional weather conditions were mainly responsible for high solar radiation, not the aerosol reduction due to the shutdown of industry and reduced traffic in the first lockdown / International research team continues to develop climate simulations that take into account influences of the COVID-19 pandemic Dry and cloudless weather was mainly responsible for the unusually high solar irradiance in western Europe during the spring of 2020, not the reduction in aerosol emissions due to the first lockdown.