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Health - Pharmacology - 23.11.2021
Unexpected regulator of heart repair
FINDINGS A study using mice by scientists at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA reveals that cardiac muscle cells play a pivotal role in determining how the heart heals following a heart attack. The findings challenge a longstanding paradigm about heart repair and identify a protein that could serve as a target for drugs to treat or prevent heart failure.

Computer Science - Microtechnics - 23.11.2021
Robots build new hanging gardens
Robots build new hanging gardens
With the help of artificial intelligence and four collaborative robots, researchers at ETH Zurich are designing and fabricating a 22.5-metre-tall green architectural sculpture. Working with Müller Illien Landscape Architects, Timbatec and other partners from industry and research, researchers from the group led by ETH architecture professors Fabio Gramazio and Matthias Kohler are creating a green architectural sculpture for the Tech Cluster Zug.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 23.11.2021
Prehistoric mums cared for kids better than we thought
Prehistoric mums cared for kids better than we thought
A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed the death rate of babies in ancient societies is not a reflection of poor healthcare, disease and other factors, but instead is an indication of the number of babies born in that era.   The findings shed new light on the history of our ancestors and debunk old assumptions that infant mortality rates were consistently high in ancient populations.

Health - Psychology - 23.11.2021
Violence against nurses: a common problem in inpatient psychiatry
Violence against nurses: a common problem in inpatient psychiatry
Verbal and sexual assaults - nurses are at a high risk of being attacked by patients in inpatient psychiatry shows a study from the University of Basel. Researchers are now calling for new strategies for violence prevention. While violence by patients towards nurses is a familiar problem in inpatient psychiatry, previous studies have not succeeded in reflecting this phenomenon in all its complexity.

Life Sciences - 23.11.2021
Dopamine plays key role in songbird mating
Dopamine plays key role in songbird mating
In humans, the dopamine system has been tied to rewards and pleasurable sensations. As well as to memory and learning. A recent study from McGill University, published in Current Biology , suggests that dopamine may also play a key role in shaping what songs female songbirds enjoy, which may ultimately affect mating as females choose (and then remember) their mates based on the songs they prefer.

Physics - Materials Science - 23.11.2021
Graphene-like 2D material leverages quantum effects to achieve ultra-low friction
Graphene-like 2D material leverages quantum effects to achieve ultra-low friction
Researchers from the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and Rice University have reported the first measurements of the ultra-low-friction behaviour of a material known as magnetene. The results point the way toward strategies for designing similar low-friction materials for use in a variety of fields, including tiny, implantable devices.  Magnetene is a 2D material, meaning it's composed of a single layer of atoms.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 23.11.2021
Evidence of a warming planet high in the Earth's atmosphere
Evidence of a warming planet high in the Earth’s atmosphere
An international team of scientists has provided further evidence of climate change by measuring the expansion of the troposphere - the lowest layer of the Earth's atmosphere - which is being driven by rising temperatures. The researchers tracked the altitude of the upper limit of the troposphere, called the tropopause, from 1980 to 2020.

Mechanical Engineering - Innovation - 23.11.2021
Research to create new ultra-precise cutting tools and sensors for aircraft parts begins
Research to create new ultra-precise cutting tools and sensors for aircraft parts begins
AI-enabled sensors for parts machining set to improve quality and help manufacturers cut costs. Last updated on Wednesday 24 November 2021 A new generation of high-precision, low-cost sensors for future smart cutting tools are in development at the University of Bath. The SENSYCUT project aims to create low-cost, nano-scale resolution sensors and cutting tools for machining operations of high value aerospace products, to increase precision, lower costs and prevent manufacturing errors.

Physics - Mathematics - 22.11.2021
Looking into four-dimensional space with light
Looking into four-dimensional space with light
Light is used for various purposes in nowadays applications. For example, data can be transmitted with light and nanoscopic structures can be created by light. To enable such applications, light must be structured. To do this, its properties - intensity (brightness), phase (position in oscillation-cycle) and polarization (direction of the oscillation) - are "tailored".

Materials Science - Physics - 22.11.2021
Mystery of high-performing solar cell materials revealed in stunning clarity | University of Cambridge
Mystery of high-performing solar cell materials revealed in stunning clarity | University of Cambridge
Researchers have visualised, for the first time, why perovskites - materials which could replace silicon in next-generation solar cells - are seemingly so tolerant of defects in their structure. The findings , led by researchers from the , are published .

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 22.11.2021
Justinianic Plague was nothing like flu and may have hit England before Constantinople | University of Cambridge
Justinianic Plague was nothing like flu and may have hit England before Constantinople | University of Cambridge
'Plague sceptics' are wrong to underestimate the devastating impact that bubonic plague had in the 6th- 8th centuries CE, argues a new study based on ancient texts and recent genetic discoveries. The same study suggests that bubonic plague may have reached England before its first recorded case in the Mediterranean via a currently unknown route, possibly involving the Baltic and Scandinavia.

Physics - 22.11.2021
Fundamental particles modelled in beam of light
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email Scientists at the University of Birmingham have succeeded in creating an experimental model of an elusive kind of fundamental particle called a skyrmion in a beam of light. The breakthrough provides physicists with a real system demonstrating the behaviour of skyrmions, first proposed 60 years ago by a University of Birmingham mathematical physicist, Professor Tony Skyrme.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.11.2021
Logistical Herculean Tasks
Logistical Herculean Tasks
11/22/2021 The question of the causes of species extinction confronts science with complex tasks. Dr Sarah Redlich from the Biocentre on the challenge of creating a study design. Research groups all over the world are trying to disentangle the causes of biodiversity loss. One thing is clear: there is no single cause.

Health - Physics - 22.11.2021
How Well Do Wet Masks Contain Droplets?
Study shows damp masks still stop respiratory droplet penetration After studying the effectiveness of varying layers of masks in stopping respiratory droplets from escaping face masks, a team of international researchers has now turned their attention to modeling what happens to droplets when they come in contact with wet masks.

Pharmacology - Health - 22.11.2021
SPARKing the fight against deadly superbugs
Disarming superbugs that can cause deadly infections is the focus of a powerful database now housed at The University of Queensland. The database and virtual laboratory, called SPARK, aims to foster the development of new antibiotics to prevent projections of 10 million deaths globally per year from superbugs by 2050.

Life Sciences - 22.11.2021
How smart is an octopus?
How smart is an octopus?
The unique brainpower of octopuses - known for their intelligence and Houdini-like escapes - has been revealed by University of Queensland researchers. Dr Wen-Sung Chung from UQ's Queensland Brain Institute is part of a team that studied four octopus species using MRI techniques to produce detailed 3D images for comparing their unique brain structures.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 22.11.2021
Justinianic Plague was nothing like flu and may have struck England before it reached Constantinople, new study suggests | University of Cambridge
Justinianic Plague was nothing like flu and may have struck England before it reached Constantinople, new study suggests | University of Cambridge
'Plague sceptics' are wrong to underestimate the devastating impact that bubonic plague had in the 6th- 8th centuries CE, argues a new study based on ancient texts and recent genetic discoveries. The same study suggests that bubonic plague may have reached England before its first recorded case in the Mediterranean via a currently unknown route, possibly involving the Baltic and Scandinavia.

Health - 22.11.2021
Exposure to Harmless Coronaviruses Boosts SARS-CoV-2 Immunity
Exposure to Harmless Coronaviruses Boosts SARS-CoV-2 Immunity
Infections with the novel coronavirus and vaccination lead to strong antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2. Immune responses to other human coronaviruses, which mostly only cause harmless colds, also provide some protection against SARS-CoV-2. This cross-reactive immune response is an important piece of the puzzle of how to achieve comprehensive coronavirus immunity, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown.

Health - 22.11.2021
Dentists at lower risk of getting COVID-19: Study
Dentists at lower risk of getting COVID-19: Study
Does close contact with patients put dentists at greater risk of catching COVID-19?  According to a new study by researchers at the University of Toronto and three other Canadian universities, dentists appear - perhaps counterintuitively - less likely than the general population to contract the virus.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.11.2021
Medicine by researchers generate cells to treat bile duct disorders resulting from cystic fibrosis
Medicine by researchers generate cells to treat bile duct disorders resulting from cystic fibrosis
Researchers at the University of Toronto and its partner hospitals have discovered a way to generate functional cells from stem cells that could open new treatment avenues for people with cystic fibrosis who have liver disease. Funded by Medicine by Design and completed with the collaborative efforts of multiple labs, the research was recently published in  Nature Communications.