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Physics - Materials Science - 17.06.2021
Tailored laser fields reveal properties of transparent crystals
Tailored laser fields reveal properties of transparent crystals
Research team led by the University of Göttingen investigates surface magnetisation The surface of a material often has properties that are very different from the properties within the material. For example, a non-conducting crystal, which actually exhibits no magnetism, can show magnetisation restricted to its surface because of the way the atoms are arranged there.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.06.2021
Study identifies trigger for ’head-to-tail’ axis development in human embryo
Scientists have identified key molecular events in the developing human embryo between days 7 and 14 - one of the most mysterious, yet critical, stages of our development.  We have revealed the patterns of gene expression in the developing embryo just after it implants in the womb Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz The second week of gestation represents a critical stage of embryo development, or embryogenesis.

Life Sciences - Environment - 17.06.2021
Detoxifiers from the landfill
Detoxifiers from the landfill
Bacteria from an Indian landfill could help eliminate contaminated chemicals. The focus is on pesticides such as lindane or brominated flame retardants, which accumulate in nature and in food chains. Researchers at Empa and Eawag used these bacteria to generate enzymes that can break down these dangerous chemicals.

Life Sciences - Economics / Business - 17.06.2021
'Unshackled' palm-destroying beetles could soon invade Australia
’Unshackled’ palm-destroying beetles could soon invade Australia
A destructive pest beetle is edging closer to Australia as biological controls fail, destroying home gardens, plantations and biodiversity as they surge through nearby Pacific islands. University of Queensland researcher Dr Kayvan Etebari has been studying how palm-loving coconut rhinoceros beetles have been accelerating their invasion.

Life Sciences - 17.06.2021
Ocean warming could hit shark survival
Infant sharks that live in the familiar mermaids' purses found on most beaches in the UK and throughout the world are more vulnerable to predation because of ocean warming, new research suggests. According to Daniel Ripley from The University of Manchester, higher temperatures reduce freeze response times which the animals employ to avoid being eaten by predators.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.06.2021
Excess nitrogen puts butterflies at risk
Excess nitrogen puts butterflies at risk
Nitrogen from agriculture, vehicle emissions and industry is endangering butterflies in Switzerland. The element is deposited in the soil via the air and has an impact on vegetation - to the detriment of the butterflies, as researchers at the University of Basel have discovered. More than half of butterfly species in Switzerland are considered to be at risk or potentially at risk.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.06.2021
Tailored optical stimulation for the blind
Tailored optical stimulation for the blind
Scientists in a European collaboration propose a personalized protocol for optimizing stimulation of optic nerve fibers, for the blind, which takes into account feedback from the viewer's brain. The protocol has been tested on artificial neural networks known to simulate the physiology of the entire visual system, from the eye to the visual cortex.

Physics - Chemistry - 16.06.2021
A sharper focus on protein behaviour
A sharper focus on protein behaviour
Scientists have developed a new computational technique that allows them to see in finer detail the way protein molecules behave.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 16.06.2021
New species of extinct lizard previously misidentified as a bird
New species of extinct lizard previously misidentified as a bird
An international research team involving UCL scientists has described a new species of Oculudentavis, providing further evidence that the animal first identified as a hummingbird-sized dinosaur was actually a lizard. The new species, named Oculudentavis naga in honor of the Naga people of Myanmar and India, and was studied using a partial skeleton that includes a complete skull, exquisitely preserved in amber with visible scales and soft tissue.

Materials Science - 16.06.2021
Honeycomb plastics offer a PEEK into future of smart prosthetic design
A new form of lightweight, impact-resistant plastic-based 'honeycomb' structures which can sense when they have been damaged could find use in new forms of 'smart' prosthetics and medical implants, its inventors suggest. In a new paper published today in the journal Materials & Design , a University of Glasgow-led team of engineers describe how they have used 3D printing techniques to add new properties to a plastic known as polyether ether ketone, or PEEK.

Physics - 16.06.2021
Quantum-nonlocality at all speeds
Quantum-nonlocality at all speeds
The phenomenon of quantum nonlocality defies our everyday intuition. It shows the strong correlations between several quantum particles some of which change their state instantaneously when the others are measured, regardless of the distance between them. While this phenomenon has been confirmed for slow moving particles, it has been debated whether nonlocality is preserved when particles move very fast at velocities close to the speed of light, and even more so when those velocities are quantum mechanically indefinite.

Life Sciences - 16.06.2021
Researchers Translate a Bird’s Brain Activity Into Song
Study demonstrates the possibilities of a future speech prosthesis for humans It is possible to re-create a bird's song by reading only its brain activity, shows a first proof-of-concept study from the University of California San Diego. The researchers were able to reproduce the songbird's complex vocalizations down to the pitch, volume and timbre of the original.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.06.2021
Immune defense: How immune cells are activated
Immune defense: How immune cells are activated
Immune cells protect our body against invading pathogens. The chemokine receptor CCR5 on the surface of T cells plays an important role in this process. However, CCR5 also is used by the HI-Virus as entrance gate into T cells. A research consortium led by the University of Basel has now deciphered the mechanism of CCR5 receptor activation.

Health - 16.06.2021
Intermittent fasting ’no magic bullet for weight loss’ says new study
New CNEM research from suggests that if you want to lose weight, intermittent fasting such as the 5:2 diet might be less effective than many people believe. Last updated on Wednesday 16 June 2021 New research published this week challenges a popular belief that intermittent fasting diets such as alternate day fasting or the '5:2' are the most effective ways to lose weight.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 16.06.2021
Scrambled magnetic fields and Gamma-Ray Bursts: Space scientists solve a decades-long puzzle
Scrambled magnetic fields and Gamma-Ray Bursts: Space scientists solve a decades-long puzzle
Bath astrophysicists find the magnetic field in Gamma-Ray Bursts is scrambled after the ejected material crashes into, and shocks, the surrounding medium. Last updated on Wednesday 16 June 2021 An international team of scientists, led by astrophysicists from the University of Bath, has measured the magnetic field in a far-off Gamma-Ray Burst, confirming for the first time a decades-long theoretical prediction - that the magnetic field in these blast waves becomes scrambled after the ejected material crashes into, and shocks, the surrounding medium.

Physics - Life Sciences - 16.06.2021
Graphene ’camera’ captures real-time electrical activity of beating heart
Bay Area scientists have captured the real-time electrical activity of a beating heart, using a sheet of graphene to record an optical image - almost like a video camera - of the faint electric fields generated by the rhythmic firing of the heart's muscle cells. The graphene camera represents a new type of sensor useful for studying cells and tissues that generate electrical voltages, including groups of neurons or cardiac muscle cells.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.06.2021
Most rivers run dry - now and then
A new study led by researchers from McGill University and INRAE found that between 51-60% of the 64 million kilometres of rivers and streams on Earth that they investigated stop flowing periodically, or run dry for part of the year. It is the first-ever empirically grounded effort to quantify the global distribution of non-perennial rivers and streams.

Social Sciences - Health - 16.06.2021
Pandemic-era crowdfunding more common, successful in affluent communities
Pandemic-era crowdfunding more common, successful in affluent communities
During the first several months of the pandemic - when communities locked down, jobs were lost, PPE was scarce and store shelves were cleared - thousands of people turned to online crowdfunding to meet their needs. But a new University of Washington analysis of requests and donations to the popular crowdfunding site GoFundMe, along with Census data, shows stark inequities in where the money went and how much was donated.

Environment - 15.06.2021
Irrigation could help reverse male sea turtle drought
Irrigation could help reverse male sea turtle drought
Climate change is causing the "feminisation" of green turtle populations in far north Queensland, but a study shows seawater irrigation could potentially reverse the male drought. The research, part of the Turtle Cooling Project including The University of Queensland's Dr David Booth and PhD candidate Melissa Staines , found that a single application of seawater could theoretically create male hatchlings.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.06.2021
Medication may help heavy-drinking smokers improve their health
A recent UCLA clinical trial has shown encouraging results in helping daily smokers who are also heavy drinkers quit smoking and cut down their alcohol intake. The study of 165 people tested two prescription drugs — varenicline, for smoking addiction, and naltrexone, which is used to treat alcoholism.
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