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Physics - Materials Science - 19.04.2024
Energy scientists unravel the mystery of gold's glow
Researchers have developed the first comprehensive model of the quantum-mechanical effects behind photoluminescence in thin gold films; a discovery that could drive the development of solar fuels and batteries. Luminescence, or the emission of photons by a substance exposed to light, has been known to occur in semiconductor materials like silicon for hundreds of years.

Health - 19.04.2024
Link between childhood maltreatment and adult substance abuse
University of Queensland researchers have found people maltreated as children are 3 times more likely to be admitted to hospital for alcohol and substance use by the time they're 40, compared to people who were not maltreated. Dr Claudia Bull from UQ's Faculty of Medicine led a study which analysed data from more than 6,000 children born in Brisbane's Mater Mother's Hospital between 1981 and 1983.

Physics - 18.04.2024
Surprising reversal in quantum systems
Surprising reversal in quantum systems
Researchers at ETH Zurich have studied topological effects in an artificial solid, making surprising observations. The new insights into topological pumping could be used for quantum technologies in the future. In principle, one shouldn't compare apples to oranges. However, in topology, which is a branch of mathematics, one has to do just that.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 18.04.2024
Mess is best: disordered structure of battery-like devices improves performance
Mess is best: disordered structure of battery-like devices improves performance
The energy density of supercapacitors - battery-like devices that can charge in seconds or a few minutes - can be improved by increasing the 'messiness' of their internal structure. This could be a turning point for a field that's been stuck for a little while. Alex Forse Researchers led by the University of Cambridge used experimental and computer modelling techniques to study the porous carbon electrodes used in supercapacitors.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 18.04.2024
Scientists grow human mini-lungs as animal alternative for nanomaterial safety testing
Human mini-lungs grown by University of Manchester scientists mimic the response of animals when exposed to certain nanomaterials. The study at the University's NanoCell Biology Lab at the Centre for Nanotechnology in Medicine is published in the influential journal nanotoday . Though not expected to replace animal models completely, human organoids could soon lead to significant reductions in research animal numbers, the team led by cell biologist and nanotoxicologist Dr Sandra Vranic argues.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 18.04.2024
Displaying the Nutri-Score in advertisements would lead to healthier food choices
Displaying the Nutri-Score in advertisements would lead to healthier food choices
For the first time, a study by a multi-disciplinary team of researchers from Aix-Marseille Université and Sorbonne Paris Nord University, including specialists in the fields of communication, nutrition, epidemiology and public health, has shown that displaying the Nutri-Score on food products in advertisements would lead consumers to choose healthier foods.

Health - 18.04.2024
New heart disease calculator could save lives by identifying high-risk patients missed by current tools
Collaborative research, led from the University of Oxford and published today in Nature Medicine , has developed a new tool called QR4 that more accurately predicts an individual's 10-year risk of cardiovascular diseases, like heart disease and stroke, particularly identifying high-risk patients that current prediction tools miss.

Environment - Social Sciences - 18.04.2024
New study on Amazonia’s fire crises urges action ahead of the next burning season
In response to the escalating fire crises in the Amazon, a timely study has revealed alarming shortcomings in the emergency fire bans implemented by the Brazilian Government. Initially seen as a promising solution in 2019, these bans have consistently fallen short in subsequent years, revealing a pressing need for strategies that address the underlying causes of each type of fire.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.04.2024
Environmental changes influence microbial diversity
Environmental changes influence microbial diversity
Environmental changes influence microbial communities, which are crucial for the health of the earth and humans. For instance, altered eating habits with heavily processed foods can lead to disrupted gut flora, or intensive agricultural practices can disturb the carbon cycle in the soil, respectively.

Life Sciences - 18.04.2024
Does a Molecular Mechanism Protect against Traumatic Memories?
Does a Molecular Mechanism Protect against Traumatic Memories?
Neuroscientists identify effect of a protein that controls memories of fear-ridden events at the biological level A previously unknown molecular mechanism could protect the brain from traumatic memories and help prevent anxiety disorders at the biological level. A research team led by Dr Ana M. M.

History / Archeology - Environment - 18.04.2024
Secrets of cave from the Early Upper Palaeolithic, when Neanderthals and the first Homo sapiens co-existed
Secrets of cave from the Early Upper Palaeolithic, when Neanderthals and the first Homo sapiens co-existed
VUB researcher reveals secrets of cave from the Early Upper Palaeolithic, when Neanderthals and the first Homo sapiens co-existed Mughr el-Hamamah, meaning "pigeon cave" in Arabic, is a site in northwestern Jordan, renowned for its prehistoric findings dating between 39,000 and 45,000 years old. Numerous stone tools, hearths, and animal and hominin bones have been excavated there.

Psychology - Health - 18.04.2024
Happily ever after
Happily ever after
Many people aspire to a successful partnership. But is this success determined by destiny, or does it result from working on the relationship? Researchers from the University of Basel have investigated the role of people's inner convictions on how they approach a relationship and how satisfaction develops over time.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.04.2024
Mutations in noncoding DNA become functional in some cancer-driving genes
Mutations in noncoding DNA become functional in some cancer-driving genes
These regions of the gene alter the abundance of mRNA and the proteins it instructs the cell to make Science + Technology These regions of the gene alter the abundance of mRNA and the proteins it instructs the cell to make Key takeaways Despite progress in defining functional elements of noncoding DNA, it is still not fully understood.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.04.2024
Adolescent stress may raise risk of postpartum depression in adults
Adolescent stress may raise risk of postpartum depression in adults
Study suggests adolescent stress may raise risk of postpartum depression in adults A Johns Hopkins Medicine-led study suggests early-life stress may lead to prolonged elevation of the hormone cortisol after childbirth and in turn, postpartum depression A Johns Hopkins Medicine -led research team reports in a new study that social stress during adolescence in female mice later results in prolonged elevation of the hormone cortisol after they give birth.

Economics - Health - 18.04.2024
CEOs' Human Concern Translates into Higher Stock Price
CEOs’ Human Concern Translates into Higher Stock Price
Compassionate leadership has tangible benefits: CEOs' expressions of empathy correlate with positive stock performance, a study led by the University of Zurich shows. The researchers analyzed data from conference calls between CEOs and financial analysts during the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic prompted an unprecedented financial crisis.

Life Sciences - 18.04.2024
Perfect balance: How the brain fine-tunes its sensitivity
Perfect balance: How the brain fine-tunes its sensitivity
A sensitive perception of the environment is crucial for guiding our behavior. However, an overly sensitive response of the brain's neural circuits to stimuli can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders such as epilepsy. University of Basel researchers report in the journal Nature how neuronal networks in the mouse brain are fine-tuned.

History / Archeology - Religions - 18.04.2024
Antisemitism in the history of Raiffeisen?
Antisemitism in the history of Raiffeisen?
On behalf of Raiffeisen Switzerland Cooperative, researchers examined the beginnings of the Raiffeisen movement in Switzerland. Their focus was on antisemitism as well as Raiffeisen during National Socialism. Raiffeisen Group in Switzerland today has 219 cooperative Raiffeisen banks. It is based on the cooperative movement started by F.W. Raiffeisen in Germany around 1860.

Microtechnics - Materials Science - 18.04.2024
An ink for 3D-printing flexible devices without mechanical joints
An ink for 3D-printing flexible devices without mechanical joints
Researchers are targeting the next generation of soft actuators and robots with an elastomer-based ink for 3D printing objects with locally changing mechanical properties, eliminating the need for cumbersome mechanical joints. For engineers working on soft robotics or wearable devices, keeping things light is a constant challenge: heavier materials require more energy to move around, and - in the case of wearables or prostheses - cause discomfort.

Health - Psychology - 18.04.2024
Results for: UCalgary researchers quantify connection between homelessness and mental health disorders
Results for: UCalgary researchers quantify connection between homelessness and mental health disorders
Researchers say findings point to vital need for specific interventions to support mental health needs of unhoused people Health-care professionals who work with people experiencing homelessness know many of the people may also be living with a mental health disorder. University of Calgary researchers wanted to better understand how often these two things are connected, and what they found surprised them.

Life Sciences - 18.04.2024
Axons follow a signposted path to reach their muscular target
Publication of the IGFL in the journal PNAS on March 19, 2024. News by CNRS Biology on April 12, 2024. During embryonic development, motor neurons, located in the spinal cord, emit extensions - the axons - which must find their way to their targets - the muscle cells. These motoneurons, last link between electrical and mechanical signals in the locomotor system, trigger movement via their axons.
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