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Pedagogy/Education Science
28.03.2017
If at first you don't succeed: Why repetition may hold key to helping children with specific language impairment
If at first you don’t succeed: Why repetition may hold key to helping children with specific language impairment
If at first you don't succeed: Why repetition may hold key to helping children with specific language impairment Simple repetition learning techniques could help young children struggling with language to learn vocabulary faster, according to the latest research from scientists from the UK and Germany.
Life Sciences
28.03.2017
When a root becomes a shoot, how plant organs change identity
When a root becomes a shoot, how plant organs change identity
As it grows, a plant produces stems and roots, organs that develop according to different patterns. Researchers from the French Inra, UPMC and ENS have shown, in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana , that roots can be transformed into shoots, and vice versa, in a conversion phenomenon involving stem cells.
Earth Sciences - Astronomy
28.03.2017
Sun's atmospheric currents may help predict solar storms
Sun’s atmospheric currents may help predict solar storms
Scientists have presented the first direct, observational evidence of atmospheric currents - similar to Rossby waves found on Earth - on the sun. The discovery has the potential to help predict solar storms that affect everything from orbiting satellites to telecommunications systems and the energy grid on Earth.
Physics/Materials Science
28.03.2017
Focusing on grains, researchers solve a mystery of rivers' flow
Focusing on grains, researchers solve a mystery of rivers’ flow
Taking a simpler approach to a complex problem, Yale researchers have an answer for why large grains move more easily than smaller ones when driven by fluid flow along a riverbed - a question that has confounded scientists for decades. Much of the natural world is shaped by flowing water that moves sediment, sand, pebbles, and other grains.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
28.03.2017
Marathon running may cause short-term kidney injury
Marathon running may cause short-term kidney injury
According to a new Yale-led study, the physical stress of running a marathon can cause short-term kidney injury. Although kidneys of the examined runners fully recovered within two days post-marathon, the study raises questions concerning potential long-term impacts of this strenuous activity at a time when marathons are increasing in popularity.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
28.03.2017
Researchers uncover secret of nanomaterial that makes harvesting sunlight easier
Researchers uncover secret of nanomaterial that makes harvesting sunlight easier
Using sunlight to drive chemical reactions, such as artificial photosynthesis, could soon become much more efficient thanks to nanomaterials. This is the conclusion of a study published today led by researchers in the Department of Physics at Imperial College London, which could ultimately help improve solar energy technologies and be used for new applications, such as using sunlight to break down harmful chemicals.
Life Sciences
28.03.2017
Brain changes in older adults increase risk for scams
Older adults who have been scammed by friends, relatives or strangers seem to behave just like elders who have avoided rip-offs. They are able to balance their checkbooks. They can remember and evaluate information. Their personalities are normal, and their arithmetic is fine. But their brains are different.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
28.03.2017
How does Oxygen get into a Fuel Cell?
How does Oxygen get into a Fuel Cell?
In order for a fuel cell to work, it needs an oxidising agent. TU Wien has now found a way to explain why oxygen does not always enter fuel cells effectively, rendering them unusable. Fuel cells use a simple chemical reaction, such as the combination of oxygen and hydrogen to form water, to generate electricity.
Medicine/Pharmacology
28.03.2017
Trial to test for oesophageal cancer risk launches across the UK
Trial to test for oesophageal cancer risk launches across the UK
A clinical trial designed by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) will allow GP surgeries to test for Barrett's oesophagus - a condition that can increase the risk of developing oesophageal cancer. The Cancer Research UK-funded trial  is led by the University of Cambridge and aims to offer the Cytosponge test, a less invasive way to test oesophageal cells in patients with acid reflux symptoms, to up to 150 GP practices.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
28.03.2017
Inflammation awakens sleepers
Inflammation awakens sleepers
The inflammatory response that is supposed to ward off pathogens that cause intestinal disease makes this even worse.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
28.03.2017
Cracking the code of Huntington's disease
Cracking the code of Huntington's disease
Huntington's disease is caused by a gene mutation that causes a protein to build up in the brain. In a world first, EPFL scientists have synthesized and studied modified forms of a mutant part of the protein, deepening our understanding of how it contributes to the disease, and pointing to new therapeutic strategies for treating it.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
28.03.2017
UQ opens new era in cancer research and drug development
UQ opens new era in cancer research and drug development
New cancer-fighting drugs and devices could emerge from The University of Queensland, thanks to a research program comparing cancers in pet animals and humans in a state-of-the-art imaging facility opened today. UQ Centre for Advanced Imaging (CAI) director Professor David Reutens said the new Australian Cancer Research Foundation (ACRF) Facility for Molecular Imaging Agents in Cancer opened a new paradigm in comparative oncology.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Civil Engineering/Traffic Engineering
28.03.2017
Bush faces more drug problems than meth alone
Bush faces more drug problems than meth alone
A high use of methylamphetamine and prescription medications is a problem for regional Australia, according to an Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC) report designed to combat illicit drugs. The Queensland Alliance for Environmental Health Sciences (QAEHS), a University of Queensland research centre, led the first of nine National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program reports.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
27.03.2017
Alcohol use in veterans with schizophrenia less common than thought
FINDINGS U.S. military veterans who are being treated for schizophrenia are much less likely to drink any alcohol than the general population. However, they are equally likely to misuse alcohol. And when they do misuse alcohol, it leads to worsening of their symptoms, according to a new study led by Dr. Alexander Young, a psychiatry professor at UCLA.
Media - Politics
27.03.2017
Link between watching light entertainment TV and voting for populist politicians
Link between watching light entertainment TV and voting for populist politicians
People exposed to light entertainment television like soap operas may be more likely to vote for populist politicians according to a new study co-authored by an economist at Queen Mary University of London. The researchers investigated the political impact of light entertainment television in Italy over the last 30 years during the phased introduction of Silvio Berlusconi's commercial TV network Mediaset.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.03.2017
Breakthrough in 'amphibian plague': deadly fungus genes identified
Breakthrough in 'amphibian plague’: deadly fungus genes identified
Scientists have identified the genes of a deadly fungus that is decimating salamander and newt populations in Northern Europe. Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal), dubbed the 'amphibian plague', is a highly infectious chytrid fungus that affects many species of salamanders and newts, literally digesting their skin, which quickly leads to death.
Medicine/Pharmacology
27.03.2017
U-M findings offer new ideas about vaccine development
ANN ARBOR?Vaccine development is largely trial and error'which results in years of pricey development and just a 6 percent success rate'but a University of Michigan researcher believes he's found a way to potentially improve those numbers. Wei Cheng, a U-M associate professor of pharmacy, and his research lab have identified a common molecular feature in existing viral vaccines that if applied broadly at the outset of new development, Cheng believes might shave years off vaccine production time while improving their success rate.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.03.2017
Colour change test to help cancer research advance
Colour change test to help cancer research advance
A simple colour changing test to help scientists investigate potential cancer drugs has been developed by University of Bath scientists, allowing research to progress at a much greater speed than has been possible until now. Researchers know that patients with several types of cancer, including prostate cancer, have higher than normal levels of a protein called AMACR, and that the protein is linked to the aggressiveness of the cancer.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
27.03.2017
Ronald Breaker named Sterling Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Ronald R. Breaker, newly named as a Sterling Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, is one of the world's experts on the diversity and function of RNAs, which are crucial to carrying out a host of life processes. Breaker is best known for his discovery of riboswitches, elements of RNA that can control the expression of genes.
Environment/Sustainable Development - History/Archeology
27.03.2017
Sun's impact on climate change quantified for first time
Sun’s impact on climate change quantified for first time
For the first time, model calculations show a plausible way that fluctuations in solar activity could have a tangible impact on the climate. Studies funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation expect human-induced global warming to tail off slightly over the next few decades. A weaker sun could reduce temperatures by half a degree.
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