Physics - Jan 22
Imperial materials scientists have created new artificial materials which combine our knowledge of metals with 3D printing. The findings could speed up the use of 3D printed materials in everything from construction and vehicles to medical devices. 3D printing is often used to produce engineering components.
Life Sciences - Jan 22
Life Sciences

So-called bifacial stem cells are responsible for one of the most critical growth processes on Earth - the formation of wood.

Chemistry - Jan 22
Chemistry

Synthetic molecules are essential for many products in our lives: medicines, crop protection agents or special materials such as Teflon.

Materials Science - Jan 22
Materials Science

Scientists at Empa teamed up with isofloc AG to develop an insulating material made of recycled paper.

Literature - Jan 21

Non-English speaking migrants take to the unique Australian dialect more readily than English-speaking migrants, according to research by ANU. The research from the School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics found migrants learning English as their second language use "Aussie words", such as 'esky', 'thong', 'doona' and 'nappy' at the same rate as Australian-born people.


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Physics - 16:04
3D printing and metals science combine for stronger, crystal-inspired materials
Imperial materials scientists have created new artificial materials which combine our knowledge of metals with 3D printing. The findings could speed up the use of 3D printed materials in everything from construction and vehicles to medical devices. 3D printing is often used to produce engineering components.

Life Sciences - 15:03
Bifacial Stem Cells Produce Wood and Bast
Bifacial Stem Cells Produce Wood and Bast
So-called bifacial stem cells are responsible for one of the most critical growth processes on Earth - the formation of wood. By alternately developing into wood and bast cells, these stem cells are thus starting points for forming wood as well as generating plant bast fibres. A team of researchers under the direction of Dr Thomas Greb, a Heisenberg Professor at Heidelberg University, were recently able to demonstrate this phenomenon using new experimental tools.

Materials Science - 12:00
Fireproofing made of recycled paper
Fireproofing made of recycled paper
Scientists at Empa teamed up with isofloc AG to develop an insulating material made of recycled paper. It is ideal for prefabricated wooden elements and even multistory timber houses, and protects the construction against fire. What's more: The additive it contains is harmless to humans, animals and the environment.

Chemistry - Pharmacology - 08:03
Chemists develop new synthesis method for producing fluorinated piperidines
Chemists develop new synthesis method for producing fluorinated piperidines
Synthetic molecules are essential for many products in our lives: medicines, crop protection agents or special materials such as Teflon. These molecules have several components, which can be combined in a variety of ways, resulting in different properties. Both so-called piperidines and fluorinated groups are particularly important.

Literature / Linguistics - 21.01.2019
Non-English speakers adopt more Australianisms: ANU research
Non-English speaking migrants take to the unique Australian dialect more readily than English-speaking migrants, according to research by ANU. The research from the School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics found migrants learning English as their second language use "Aussie words", such as 'esky', 'thong', 'doona' and 'nappy' at the same rate as Australian-born people.

Environment - 21.01.2019
Warning for world’s groundwater reserves
Future generations could be faced with an environmental ‘time bomb' if climate change is to have a significant effect on the world's essential groundwater reserves. This is according to a researcher from Cardiff University and a team of international collaborators who have for the first time provided a global insight in to what will happen should our groundwater systems start to see changes in their replenishment.

Environment - 21.01.2019
Forest soils need decades to recover from fires and logging
A landmark study from The Australian National University (ANU) has found that forest soils need several decades to recover from bushfires and logging - much longer than previously thought. Lead researcher Elle Bowd from the ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society said the team found forest soils recovered very slowly over many years from these events - up to 80 years following a bushfire and at least 30 years after logging.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.01.2019
Discovery of bacterial signature of intestinal disease
Researchers from the Department of Biomedical Research of the University of Bern and the University Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine of the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland, have discovered that changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease affect the severity of the disease and the success of therapy.

Agronomy / Food Science - 21.01.2019
Teens keep active despite asthma or eczema
A fresh look by the University of Bristol at how teenagers are affected by their asthma, eczema or obesity has some reassuring findings published in BMJ Open today (Monday 21 January). Researchers supported by the NIHR Bristol Biomedical Research Centre found that both girls and boys at the ages of 12, 14 and 16 did not experience different levels of active or sedentary time if they had asthma or eczema compared to their peers.

Social Sciences - 21.01.2019
In China, a link between happiness and air quality
Moods expressed on social media tend to decline when air pollution gets worse, study finds. For many years, China has been struggling to tackle high pollution levels that are crippling its major cities. Indeed, a recent study by researchers at Chinese Hong Kong University has found that air pollution in the country causes an average of 1.1 million premature deaths each year and costs its economy $38 billion.

Life Sciences - 21.01.2019
’inhibition’ theory of autism wrong
A detailed study of four mouse models of autism challenges the most common assumption about what goes wrong in brain circuits to cause disease symptoms. The major hypothesis today - one supported by many animal studies - has been that neurons in the autistic brain receive too little inhibition or too much excitation, which causes hyperexcitability or increased "spiking.” This excess spiking by neurons is thought to act like noise that interferes with normal brain function.

Life Sciences - 21.01.2019
Brain training app improves users' concentration
Brain training app improves users’ concentration
A new 'brain training' game designed by researchers at the University of Cambridge improves users' concentration, according to new research published today. The scientists behind the venture say this could provide a welcome antidote to the daily distractions that we face in a busy world. A team from the Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute at the University of Cambridge has developed and tested 'Decoder', a new game that is aimed at helping users improve their attention and concentration.

Astronomy / Space Science - 21.01.2019
Mystery orbits in outermost reaches of solar system not caused by 'Planet Nine', say researchers
Mystery orbits in outermost reaches of solar system not caused by ’Planet Nine’, say researchers
The strange orbits of some objects in the farthest reaches of our solar system, hypothesised by some astronomers to be shaped by an unknown ninth planet, can instead be explained by the combined gravitational force of small objects orbiting the Sun beyond Neptune, say researchers.

Business / Economics - 21.01.2019
Ers take a step forward in understanding human feet
Researchers have taken strides in understanding how human feet evolved to enhance walking and running, setting us apart from species such as chimpanzees. Findings from The University of Queensland and University of Exeter study could be used to improve exercises for foot-related injuries, understanding of conditions such as flat feet, and the design of footwear.

Microtechnics - 18.01.2019
Smart microrobots that can adapt to their surroundings
Smart microrobots that can adapt to their surroundings
Scientists at EPFL and ETH Zurich have developed tiny elastic robots that can change shape depending on their surroundings. Modeled after bacteria and fully biocompatible, these robots optimize their movements so as to get to hard-to-reach areas of the human body. They stand to revolutionize targeted drug delivery.

- 18.01.2019
Enhanced NMR reveals chemical structures in a fraction of the time
Enhanced NMR reveals chemical structures in a fraction of the time
Technique could yield insights into complex proteins involved in Alzheimer's and other diseases. MIT researchers have developed a way to dramatically enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), a technique used to study the structure and composition of many kinds of molecules, including proteins linked to Alzheimer's and other diseases.

- 18.01.2019
Tracks link between PTSD treatment utilization and compensation exams
Veterans who sought compensation for service-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were more likely to attend PTSD-related treatment sessions before their compensation exams than after, but only if the veterans had strong beliefs about a treatment-compensation connection, according to a new study by Yale Department of Psychiatry researchers.

Health - 18.01.2019
To investigate a common Caesarean birth complication
Obstetricians, midwives and women who've had babies by Caesarean section are taking part in a new study to find out which technique is best used by the surgeon if the baby's head is found to be stuck in the pelvis at the time of Caesarean delivery. Around 15% of babies are delivered by emergency C-section in the UK and the problem of ‘impacted fetal head' occurs in about 1.5% of these operations - that's around 1,500 babies who have to be manoeuvred very carefully to release their head from the pelvis.

Chemistry - Physics - 18.01.2019
Bringing electricity and chemistry together with a £1.6M project
Bringing electricity and chemistry together with a £1.6M project
Dr Clotilde Cucinotta is trying to solve the combined electrical and chemical problem, paving the way for next-generation energy sources. Dr Cucinotta joined Imperial this year, bringing an EPSRC grant of more than £1.6 million and a wide range of experience. We talked to her about her research, her journey so far, and why the Molecular Sciences Research Hub - the new home for Chemistry at Imperial's White City campus - is the best place to carry out her plans.

Physics - Chemistry - 18.01.2019
Hand-knitted Molecules
Hand-knitted Molecules
Molecules are usually formed in reaction vessels or laboratory flasks. An Empa research team has now succeeded in producing molecules between two microscopically small, movable gold tips - in a sense as a "hand-knitted" unique specimen. The properties of the molecules can be monitored in real time while they are being produced.
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