Medicine - Jul 20
By drawing in a bit of sweat, a patch developed in the lab of Alberto Salleo can reveal how much cortisol a person is producing. Cortisol is known as the stress hormone but is involved in many important physiological functions. The hormone cortisol rises and falls naturally throughout the day and can spike in response to stress but current methods for measuring cortisol levels require waiting several days for results from a lab.
Medicine - Jul 20

Ribonucleic Acid is a crucial component in human gene expression, and it may have the ability to treat virtually every known disease.

Business - Jul 20

Pupils who have immigrated to the UK have a significantly more positive attitude towards school than their peers whose parents were born here, new research has revealed.

Environment - Jul 20
Environment

Under warmer conditions, plants can take up more carbon dioxide by using carbon more efficiently for growth, shows a new study.

Pedagogy - Jul 20

Teenagers who regularly clash with their parents are more likely to have given time to a charity or humanitarian cause, a study has shown.


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Results 1 - 20 of 2005.
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Medicine / Pharmacology - Physics / Materials Science - 20.07.2018
A wearable device measures cortisol in sweat
By drawing in a bit of sweat, a patch developed in the lab of Alberto Salleo can reveal how much cortisol a person is producing. Cortisol is known as the stress hormone but is involved in many important physiological functions. The hormone cortisol rises and falls naturally throughout the day and can spike in response to stress but current methods for measuring cortisol levels require waiting several days for results from a lab.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 20.07.2018
Whitehead’s Research Could Revolutionize Medicine with Cutting-Edge Science
Ribonucleic Acid is a crucial component in human gene expression, and it may have the ability to treat virtually every known disease. Katie Whitehead, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, is leading the way with research that could one day enable personalized RNA therapies.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.07.2018
How plants use carbon affects their response to climate change
How plants use carbon affects their response to climate change
Under warmer conditions, plants can take up more carbon dioxide by using carbon more efficiently for growth, shows a new study. Plants take in - or ‘fix' - carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis. Some of the carbon is used for plant growth, and some of it is used in respiration, where the plant breaks down sugars to get energy.

Business / Economics - Social Sciences - 20.07.2018
Immigrant pupils more likely to think school can help them succeed than UK-born peers
Pupils who have immigrated to the UK have a significantly more positive attitude towards school than their peers whose parents were born here, new research has revealed. Experts from the University of Bristol and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) analysed data from over 4,500 pupils aged 15 and 16 in 204 schools in England* and found immigration status is a key driver of attitude.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 20.07.2018
Young people who frequently argue with their parents are better citizens, research finds
Teenagers who regularly clash with their parents are more likely to have given time to a charity or humanitarian cause, a study has shown. The survey of 13 and 14 year-olds carried out by academics at Cardiff University, showed those who argued “a lot” with their mother and father, compared to those who “never” argued, were also more likely to have been involved with a human rights organisation in the past 12 months and to have contacted a politician or signed a petition.

Life Sciences - 20.07.2018
When dingoes first arrived in Australia
When dingoes first arrived in Australia
Given the distance of the Nullabor from northern Australia where it is thought dingoes were first introduced, we are suggesting they were introduced about 3,500 years ago. Radiocarbon dating of the oldest known dingo bones has confirmed that the species likely arrived in Australia more recently than previously believed.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 20.07.2018
The genes are not to blame
The genes are not to blame
Research news Individualized dietary recommendations based on genetic information are currently a popular trend. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has systematically analyzed scientific articles and reached the following conclusion: There is no clear evidence for the effect of genetic factors on the consumption of total calories, carbohydrates, and fat.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Computer Science / Telecom - 20.07.2018
Doctors rely on more than just data for medical decision making
Many technology companies are working on artificial intelligence systems that can analyze medical data to help diagnose or treat health problems. Such systems raise the question of whether this kind of technology can perform as well as a human doctor. A new study from MIT computer scientists suggests that human doctors provide a dimension that, as yet, artificial intelligence does not.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 19.07.2018
Evidence of Salmonella Paratyphi C found for the first time in medieval northern Europe
A Eight hundred year old Norwegian skeleton found to have traces of Salmonella. This research Reshapes understanding of the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica. Genome research conducted by the University of Warwick suggests that enteric fever, a potentially lethal disease more commonly found in hot countries, was present in medieval Europe.

Earth Sciences - 19.07.2018
Deep groundwater in coastal deltas resilient to contamination
Groundwater pumped from the depths of the coastal Bengal Basin supporting more than 80 million people is largely secure from contamination, according to new research by UCL and the British Geological Survey. The study shows that groundwater pumped from depths below 150m in the coastal regions of the Bengal Basin is thousands of years old, and generally secure from contamination by salinity and arsenic found in shallow groundwater.

Innovation / Technology - Environment - 19.07.2018
A peek inside Ronald Rael's 3D-printed 'Cabin of Curiosities'
A peek inside Ronald Rael’s 3D-printed ’Cabin of Curiosities’
UC Berkeley associate professor of architecture Ronald Rael's " Cabin of Curiosities" is a livable, water-tight structure in Oakland that was unveiled in May of 2018. With succulents growing off the exterior walls and a translucent interior, the cabin catches the eye and inspires wonder. What makes the structure truly unique, however, is not its beauty, but the fact that nearly every element of the cabin was constructed out of 3D-printed materials.

Life Sciences - Environment - 19.07.2018
New insights into plants' conquest of land
New insights into plants’ conquest of land
The Earth is filled with diverse and remarkable plant forms from the tallest redwoods that pierce forest canopies, to the smallest mosses that blanket the ground underfoot. However, these striking forms came from much simpler origins. The ancestors of land plants were string-like (2D), aquatic green algae that looked very different from the three-dimensional (3D), upright stems and leaves of plants we are familiar with today.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 19.07.2018
New study puts a figure on sea-level rise following Antarctic ice shelves' collapse
New study puts a figure on sea-level rise following Antarctic ice shelves’ collapse
An international team of scientists has shown how much sea level would rise if Larsen C and George VI, two Antarctic ice shelves at risk of collapse, were to break up. While Larsen C has received much attention due to the break-away of a trillion-tonne iceberg from it last summer, its collapse would contribute only a few millimetres to sea-level rise.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.07.2018
Low- or no-calorie soft drinks linked to improved outcomes in colon cancer
Drinking artificially sweetened beverages is associated with a significantly lower risk of colon cancer recurrence and cancer death, a team of investigators led by a Yale Cancer Center scientist has found. The study was published today in PLOS ONE. " Artificially sweetened drinks have a checkered reputation in the public because of purported health risks that have never really been documented," said the study's senior author, Charles S. Fuchs, M.D. , director of Yale Cancer Center.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Business / Economics - 19.07.2018
More racial diversity among physicians would lead to better health among black men
African-American doctors could help reduce cardiovascular mortality among black men by 19 percent - if there was more racial diversity among physicians, according to a new study led by Stanford Health Policy's Marcella Alsan. After conducting a  randomized clinical trial among 1,300 black men in Oakland, the researchers found that the men sought more preventive services after they were randomly seen by black doctors for a free health-care screening compared to non-black doctors.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.07.2018
Key social reward circuit in the brain impaired in kids with autism
Deficits in the brain's reward circuit are linked to social deficits in children with autism and may point the way toward better treatments, according to a new Stanford study. MRI scans revealed that kids with autism have deficits in a brain pathway that normally makes social interaction feel rewarding.

Computer Science / Telecom - Physics / Materials Science - 19.07.2018
Ramamoorthy Ramesh To Lead
Ramamoorthy Ramesh To Lead "Beyond Moore’s Law" Initiative
After serving four years as Berkeley Lab's Associate Director for Energy Technologies, Ramamoorthy Ramesh will be returning to his research in ultra low-power electronics while also helping to lead a major Berkeley Lab research initiative in next-generation, energy-efficient microelectronics. This new initiative has been dubbed "Beyond Moore's Law," as it seeks the solution to what will happen when Moore's Law - which holds that the number of transistors on a chip will double about every two years - comes to an inevitable end as physical limitations are reached.

Environment - Administration / Government - 19.07.2018
Workers’ rights should be at the heart of global sustainable development, says new report
Workers' rights should be at the heart of global sustainable development, says new report (17 July 2018) Workers' rights should be placed at the heart of global efforts to improve sustainable development, according to a new international study. The Unacceptable Forms of Work: Global Dialogue/Location Innovation report , led by Durham University, UK, came as the world's politicians met to review progress towards the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) .

Medicine / Pharmacology - 19.07.2018
Complementary medicine for cancer can decrease survival
People who received complementary therapy for curable cancers were more likely to refuse at least one component of their conventional cancer treatment, and were more likely to die as a result, according to researchers from Yale Cancer Center and the Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research Center (COPPER) at Yale School of Medicine.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 19.07.2018
Using adrenaline in cardiac arrests results in less than 1% more people leaving hospital alive - but nearly doubles the survivors’ risk of severe brain damage
Using adrenaline in cardiac arrests results in less than 1% more people leaving hospital alive - but nearly doubles the survivors' risk of severe brain damage A clinical trial of the use of adrenaline in cardiac arrests has found that its use results in less than 1% more people leaving hospital alive - but almost doubles the risk of severe brain damage for survivors of cardiac arrest.
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