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Environment - Aug 11
Researchers recommend that protections be strengthened for wetlands of all sizes. Relying on stormwater management (SWM) ponds to restore the depleting wetlands is not sustainable and lacks the critical ecosystem services vital for biodiversity, a new study found. With the continued losses of wetlands projected in the near future and emphasis on the underestimation of provincial wetland loss, the study captures the contributions of SWM ponds in a changing network of water bodies and the effects of land use and land cover in this change.
Computer Science - Aug 11
Computer Science

Is AI our only hope for the future of humankind? Professor Sami Kaski explores how this powerful tool could help meet the challenges facing our world. But how do we ensure that the human is present in the machine?

Paleontology - Aug 11
Paleontology

Scientists have cracked an enduring mystery, discovering how sauropod dinosaurs - like Brontosaurus and Diplodocus - supported their gigantic bodies on land.

Economics - Aug 11

University of Queensland, Oxford and Princeton researchers have developed a "test" to measure if businesses are on track to meet Paris Agreement climate action goals, and so far the results are not promising.

Health - Aug 11
Health

Study finds harmful chemicals present in large sample of pregnant women


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Environment - 11.08.2022
Stormwater management ponds may not hold the solution for depleting wetlands
Researchers recommend that protections be strengthened for wetlands of all sizes Relying on stormwater management (SWM) ponds to restore the depleting wetlands is not sustainable and lacks the critical ecosystem services vital for biodiversity, a new study found. With the continued losses of wetlands projected in the near future and emphasis on the underestimation of provincial wetland loss, the study captures the contributions of SWM ponds in a changing network of water bodies and the effects of land use and land cover in this change.

Computer Science - Innovation - 11.08.2022
Putting the Human Back into the Algorithm
Putting the Human Back into the Algorithm
Is AI our only hope for the future of humankind? Professor Sami Kaski explores how this powerful tool could help meet the challenges facing our world. But how do we ensure that the human is present in the machine? Artificial Intelligence (AI) is all around us. From the smart watches we wear everyday collecting our personal biodata to helping medical professionals prescribe to patients, this technology has the potential to greatly advance global health services, to name just one area, in the future.

Economics / Business - Environment - 11.08.2022
Businesses score ’F’ on climate action test
University of Queensland, Oxford and Princeton researchers have developed a "test" to measure if businesses are on track to meet Paris Agreement climate action goals, and so far the results are not promising. The study, led by UQ Business School's Assistant Professor Saphira Rekker , has found 10 global cement companies and nine Australian utility companies were not complying with Paris Agreement targets to tackle climate change.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 11.08.2022
Prehistoric podiatry: How dinosaurs carried their enormous weight
Prehistoric podiatry: How dinosaurs carried their enormous weight
Scientists have cracked an enduring mystery, discovering how sauropod dinosaurs - like Brontosaurus and Diplodocus - supported their gigantic bodies on land. A University of Queensland and Monash University-led team used 3D modelling and engineering methods to digitally reconstruct and test the foot bones.

Health - 11.08.2022
Harmful chemicals present in large sample of pregnant women
Harmful chemicals present in large sample of pregnant women
Study finds harmful chemicals present in large sample of pregnant women Researchers found highest level of toxins, including hormone disruptors, in Black and Latina Women Pregnant women are exposed to a wide variety of chemicals that may have adverse effects on maternal and child health. Despite the risks they pose, few of these chemicals are routinely measured in humans.

Earth Sciences - 11.08.2022
Evidence that giant meteorite impacts created the continents
Evidence that giant meteorite impacts created the continents
New Curtin research has provided the strongest evidence yet that Earth's continents were formed by giant meteorite impacts that were particularly prevalent during the first billion years or so of our planet's four-and-a-half-billion year history. Dr Tim Johnson, from Curtin's  School of Earth and Planetary Sciences , said the idea that the continents originally formed at sites of giant meteorite impacts had been around for decades, but until now there was little solid evidence to support the theory.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.08.2022
Genetic mapping of tumours reveals how cancers grow
Genetic mapping of tumours reveals how cancers grow
Researchers from the University of Oxford, KTH Royal Institute of Technology , Science for Life Laboratory , and the Karolinska Institutet , Solna, Sweden, have found that individual prostate tumours contain a previously unknown range of genetic variation. Understanding which cells give rise to which areas of cancer can improve our understanding of how a tumour has grown and developed, including how it has changed genetically, over time.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 11.08.2022
Fluoride in groundwater: global map shows all risk areas for the first time
Fluoride in groundwater: global map shows all risk areas for the first time
As an additive in toothpaste, it protects our teeth from decay. But when fluoride occurs in nature in larger quantities and accumulates in groundwater, it can become a hazard for our health. For the first time, scientists have produced a detailed map of global fluoride contamination in groundwater and shown which regions of the world are particularly affected.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 10.08.2022
One more clue to the Moon's origin
One more clue to the Moon’s origin
Researchers from ETH Zurich discover the first definitive proof that the Moon inherited indigenous noble gases from the Earth's mantle. The discovery represents a significant piece of the puzzle towards understanding how the Moon and, potentially, the Earth and other celestial bodies were formed. Humankind has maintained an enduring fascination with the Moon.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.08.2022
Clock is ticking to save East Antarctica from climate change
Clock is ticking to save East Antarctica from climate change
The worst effects of global warming on the world's largest ice sheet could be avoided if nations around the world succeed in meeting climate targets outlined in the Paris Agreement. That's the call from an international team of climate scientists, including experts from The Australian National University (ANU) and the Australian Centre for Excellence in Antarctic Science (ACEAS), who have examined how much sea levels could rise if climate change melts the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS).

Environment - Campus - 10.08.2022
Opportunity for inclusivity in recreation planning for Protected Areas
Many socio-demographic groups are underrepresented among visitors to Protected Areas Many socio-demographic groups, such as those with disabilities and minority ethnic communities, are underrepresented among visitors to Protected Areas due to institutional barriers, a new study found. Protected Areas (PA) provide many benefits to visitors, including mental and physical health and environmental knowledge.

Environment - Life Sciences - 10.08.2022
How best to promote biodiversity in vineyards
How best to promote biodiversity in vineyards
Researchers at the University of Bern have investigated how organic, biodynamic and conventional management in vineyards affects insect fauna. They were able to show that organic - and to a lesser extent biodynamic - management provides better habitat conditions for insects than conventionally managed vineyards.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.08.2022
'Dementia in a dish' photo taken by UCL researcher wins research image competition
’Dementia in a dish’ photo taken by UCL researcher wins research image competition
Dr Charlie Arber (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology) has been named the winner of Alzheimer's Society's first ever research image competition, with a picture of brain cells grown from the skin of people with dementia. The Spotlight on Dementia contest aimed to shine a light on crucial dementia research done by academics who are funded by the charity, and challenged them to showcase their work through creative images and video.

Chemistry - Physics - 10.08.2022
Chemists develop new reagent for deelectronation
Chemists develop new reagent for deelectronation
The reagent provides access to the class of clustered transition metal carbonyl cations Chemists from Freiburg have succeeded in converting polynuclear transition metal carbonyls into their homoleptic complex cations using typical inorganic oxidants. In their work, the research team of Malte Sellin , Christian Friedmann and Ingo Krossing from the Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry and Maximilian Mayländer and Sabine Richert from the Institute of Physical Chemistry at the University of Freiburg show that the anthracene derivative with a half-step potential of 1.

History / Archeology - 10.08.2022
Prehistoric Brits used rare rock crystals to mark burial sites
Prehistoric Brits used rare rock crystals to mark burial sites
Distinctive and rare rock crystals were moved over long distances by Early Neolithic Brits and were used to mark their burial sites, according to groundbreaking new archaeological research. Evidence for the use of rock crystal - a rare type of perfectly transparent quartz which forms in large hexagonal gems - has occasionally been found at prehistoric sites in the British Isles, but little investigation has previously been done specifically into how the material was used and its potential significance.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.08.2022
How a harmful fungus renders its host plant defenseless
How a harmful fungus renders its host plant defenseless
Study shows the surgical precision employed by the pathogen in this process The fungus Ustilago maydis attacks corn and can cause significant damage to its host. To do this, it first ensures that the plant offers little resistance to the infection. The surgical precision it applies is shown by a new study from the University of Bonn, which has now been published in the journal New Phytologist.

Life Sciences - 10.08.2022
Neutrons help track down Mammalian Ancestors
Investigations at Research Neutron Source lead to discovery of a previously unknown animal species A team of German and Argentinian researchers has used neutrons in the FRM II research neutron source at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) to identify an animal species that has been extinct for 220 million years.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.08.2022
New prognostic marker discovered for multiple sclerosis severity
It is essential to assess the severity of multiple sclerosis (MS) in order to choose appropriate therapeutic measures, but this cannot be reliably done using existing methods. A MedUni Vienna study now shows for the first time that the retina can be used as a prognostic marker. Analyses revealed that retinal layer thinning as a result of an MS relapse predicts the severity of future relapses and, hence, the likelihood of disability.

Health - Chemistry - 10.08.2022
University of Toronto chemist aims to improve diagnosis of disease one protein molecule at a time
University of Toronto chemist aims to improve diagnosis of disease one protein molecule at a time
Scientists understand that proteins cause various diseases, from Alzheimer's to cystic fibrosis to Parkinson's to cataracts. But detecting them before they trigger illness is still a work in progress. For University of Toronto analytical chemist  Alana Ogata , the answer is to find better ways to identify single protein molecules in our bodily fluids, such as blood, urine, saliva and sweat.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.08.2022
Secret behind ’nic-sickness’ could help break tobacco addiction
Nicotine is addictive because it activates the brain's dopamine network, which makes us feel good. UC Berkeley researchers now show in experiments on mice that nicotine in high doses also activates a recently discovered dopamine network that responds to unpleasant stimuli. This aversive dopamine network could be leveraged to create a therapy that boosts the negative effects and lessens the rewards of nicotine.
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