news

Health - May 30
Health
South Korean interventions controlled the transmission of COVID-19 quickly, resulting in a smaller epidemic made up of "clusters" of cases. A new report from the Imperial College London COVID-19 Response Team says that caution is needed in attempting to duplicate the South Korean “test, trace, isolate” response in countries with larger and more generalised epidemics.
Health - May 29

Patients undergoing surgery after contracting coronavirus are at greatly increased risk of postoperative death, a new global study published in The Lancet reveals. Researchers found that amongst SARS-CoV-2 infected patients who underwent surgery, mortality rates approach those of the sickest patients admitted to intensive care after contracting the virus in the community.

Astronomy - May 29
Astronomy

' Oumuamua, the first known interstellar object to pass through Earth's solar system, has been called many things: a comet, an asteroid, a cigar-shaped spaceship.

Health - May 29

Two Yale emergency physicians have designed a tool to help clinicians better identify COVID-19 patients whose condition is likely to worsen rapidly and who will need intensive care within 24 hours.

Health - May 29
Health

Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From insights into the cause of Alzheimer's and Type 2 Diabetes, to simulating the Universe with mobile phones, here is some quick-read news from across the College.


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Health - 30.05.2020
Identifying clusters central to South Korea's COVID-19 response
Identifying clusters central to South Korea’s COVID-19 response
South Korean interventions controlled the transmission of COVID-19 quickly, resulting in a smaller epidemic made up of "clusters" of cases. A new report from the Imperial College London COVID-19 Response Team says that caution is needed in attempting to duplicate the South Korean “test, trace, isolate” response in countries with larger and more generalised epidemics.

Health - 29.05.2020
COVID-19 patients who undergo surgery are at increased risk of postoperative death - global study
Patients undergoing surgery after contracting coronavirus are at greatly increased risk of postoperative death, a new global study published in The Lancet reveals. Researchers found that amongst SARS-CoV-2 infected patients who underwent surgery, mortality rates approach those of the sickest patients admitted to intensive care after contracting the virus in the community.

Health - 29.05.2020
Yale doctors design tool to predict rapid COVID-19 decline
Two Yale emergency physicians have designed a tool to help clinicians better identify COVID-19 patients whose condition is likely to worsen rapidly and who will need intensive care within 24 hours.  The tool, which uses predictive modeling, is called the  COVID-19 severity index  and is available online. To use it, emergency room doctors input just three patient parameters: rate of breathing, oxygen level, and the amount of oxygen required from a nasal cannula, a device used to deliver supplemental oxygen.

Astronomy / Space Science - 29.05.2020
Ahoy! 'Oumuamua may be a hydrogen iceberg
Ahoy! ’Oumuamua may be a hydrogen iceberg
' Oumuamua, the first known interstellar object to pass through Earth's solar system, has been called many things: a comet, an asteroid, a cigar-shaped spaceship. Now it has a new description: Astronomers at Yale and the University of Chicago say it's a hydrogen iceberg. A study based on the researchers' findings has been accepted by the Astrophysical Journal Letters and appears on the preprint website arXiv.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.05.2020
Misfolded proteins and simulating the Universe: News from the College
Misfolded proteins and simulating the Universe: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From insights into the cause of Alzheimer's and Type 2 Diabetes, to simulating the Universe with mobile phones, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Biophysical origins Amyloids are misfolded proteins whose presence can lead to diseases like Alzheimer's and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D).

Life Sciences - 29.05.2020
When one pixel is enough: 'single pixel' vision in fish could help scientists understand how humans see tiny detail
When one pixel is enough: ’single pixel’ vision in fish could help scientists understand how humans see tiny detail
Recently discovered ‘single-pixel vision' in fish could help researchers understand how humans are able to spot tiny details in their environment - like stars in the sky. In a paper published this week, researchers at the University of Sussex found that zebrafish are able to use a single photoreceptor to spot their tiny prey.

Health - 29.05.2020
Mobile data shows high compliance with lockdown rules across the UK
People across the UK drastically reduced their movement outside of home following lockdown, although slight rises have occurred since April. Initial compliance with COVID-19 social distancing was high and geographically consistent throughout the United Kingdom, the Imperial College London COVID-19 Response Team has found.

Mathematics - Health - 29.05.2020
Solution to century-old math problem could predict transmission of infectious diseases
A Bristol academic has achieved a milestone in statistical/mathematical physics by solving a 100-year-old physics problem - the discrete diffusion equation in finite space. The long-sought-after solution could be used to accurately predict encounter and transmission probability between individuals in a closed environment, without the need for time-consuming computer simulations.

Life Sciences - Environment - 29.05.2020
Machine learning helps map global ocean communities
Machine learning helps map global ocean communities
On land, it's fairly obvious where one ecological region ends and another begins, for instance at the boundary between a desert and savanna. In the ocean, much of life is microscopic and far more mobile, making it challenging for scientists to map the boundaries between ecologically distinct marine regions.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 29.05.2020
Researchers use brain imaging to demonstrate weaker neural suppression in individuals with autism
People with autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, may experience sensory hypersensitivity more often than people without ASD, according to the National Autism Association. Among other responses, this hypersensitivity can lead to "sensory overload," when sensory systems like vision or hearing are "overwhelmed" by stimuli.

Health - Pharmacology - 29.05.2020
COVID-19 mortality in hospitalised cancer patients is not significantly affected by anti-cancer treatments
A new study led by the Universities of Birmingham and Oxford has found the mortality rate in cancer patients who are assessed or treated in hospital with COVID-19 is not significantly affected by chemotherapy or other anti-cancer treatments. Published in The Lancet, the study was devised by steering committee of the UK Coronavirus Cancer Monitoring Project (UKCCMP) which launched in March, and collects information on UK cancer patients who are diagnosed with COVID-19.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 29.05.2020
UW-Madison scientist helps set national earth sciences research priorities for next decade
Andrea Dutton, examining rock samples at the University of Florida, says, "Earth science issues impact our daily lives in many different ways. So, when policies are developed, it's imperative they are at least informed and evidence-based so we can make good decisions about what to do” Photo by Erica Brouch On May 20, 2020, the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine published a report that provides a framework for the next 10 years of research in the earth sciences.

Computer Science - 29.05.2020
USB software security tool catches 26 bugs across operating systems
USB software security tool catches 26 bugs across operating systems
EPFL researchers have developed a new tool called USBFuzz, which they have already used to detect 26 vulnerabilities in the USB driver stacks of widely used operating systems including Linux, Windows, and macOS. USB driver stacks are components that help computers communicate with external devices via the Universal Serial Bus (USB) connection.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 29.05.2020
New materials could make greener fast-charging batteries
New materials could make greener fast-charging batteries
Researchers have created a fast-charging battery prototype that uses sodium instead of lithium, potentially leading to more sustainable batteries. The prototype is one of the first to successfully use sodium in an organic battery that can be quickly charged and discharged hundreds of times without losing any capacity.

Health - Social Sciences - 29.05.2020
Black and Asian groups are at higher risk of COVID-19 infection
Black and south Asian ethnic groups in England appear to be at higher risk of COVID-19, as well as hospitalisation with the disease. New UK Biobank research, led by the University of Glasgow and published today in BMC Medicine , has found that black and south Asian ethnic groups have a higher risk of testing positive with SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes COVID-19.

Environment - 29.05.2020
The forest is changing
The forest is changing
Globally, forests are increasingly under pressure. Climatic extremes such as heat and drought are major stress factors for them. A study in cooperation with the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and published in Science is examining, how global change may affect forests in the future. The researchers present potential scenarios of future forest development and thereby offer important information for forest policy and management.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.05.2020
Global environmental changes are leading to shorter, younger trees - new study
Ongoing environmental changes are transforming forests worldwide, resulting in shorter and younger trees with broad impacts on global ecosystems, scientists say. In a global study published in the 29 May 2020 , researchers including experts at the University of Birmingham, showed how rising temperatures and carbon dioxide have been altering the world's forests.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.05.2020
Bacteria breakthrough could lead to new biomaterials
Bacteria breakthrough could lead to new biomaterials
Physicists at The Australian National University (ANU) have found a way to manipulate the growth of bacterial biofilms - one of the most abundant forms of life on earth. The breakthrough could help improve how we deal with chronic infections and antibiotic resistance, as well as the food we eat and the clothes we wear.

Electroengineering - Health - 28.05.2020
Using electrical stimulus to regulate genes
Using electrical stimulus to regulate genes
A team of researchers has succeeded in using an electric current to directly control gene expression for the first time. Their work provides the basis for medical implants that can be switched on and off using electronic devices outside the body. This is how it works. A device containing insulin-producing cells and an electronic control unit is implanted in the body of a diabetic.

Environment - 28.05.2020
Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 metres per day
Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 metres per day
The ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic coastline retreated at speeds of up to 50 metres per day at the end of the last Ice Age, far more rapid than the satellite-derived retreat rates observed today, new research has found.
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