Painless patch for continuous health monitoring

Health - Jun 18
Health

Researchers develop a painless patch for continuous health monitoring. Researchers at two Ontario universities have developed a pain-free, wearable sensor that can continuously monitor levels of blood sugar, lactates and other critical health indicators for weeks at a time, sending results to a smartphone or other device.

Pharmacology - Jun 18

Psoriasis Probe shows high level of arthritis symptoms in patients

Pharmacology

Early results of an international study examining the risk of arthritis for people with psoriasis have shown a high burden of joint symptoms in 712 patients - 25% of the total studied so far.

Microtechnics - Jun 17

Engineers unlock design for record-breaking robot that could jump twice the height of Big Ben

Microtechnics

Manchester engineers unlock design for record-breaking robot that could jump twice the height of Big Ben Engineers at The University of Manchester hav

Environment - Jun 17

Understanding the Green Sahara’s Collapse

TUM Scientists Develop New Method for Early Detection of Climate Tipping Points. Abrupt shifts within complex systems such as the Earth's climate system are extremely hard to predict.

Physics - Jun 17

The nanotechnological revolution requires standardised ’screws’ - here is a way to measure them

Physics

Physicists at the University of Bath lead on the discovery of a new optical property that measures the twist in tiny helices.

Health - Jun 17

Your bra size is affecting how much you sweat, and it’s not what you’d think

Health

A study by the University of Southampton has revealed a surprising link between breast size and the amount of sweat produced by the breast during exercise.

Music - Jun 18

The ’Queen of the Night’ does not whistle

Music

New findings about the sound production mechanism of ultra-high-pitched operatic singing.

Environment - Jun 17

’Forever chemicals’ found in English otters

New research by Cardiff University's Otter Project has found that PFAS, also known as 'forever chemicals', present in English otters, raising concerns about potential health impacts in the future.

Chemistry - Jun 17

Golden Ball Mills as Green Catalysts

Chemistry

Less waste, mild reaction conditions, and no harmful solvents - only a very thin layer of gold is necessary to sustainably convert alcohols into aldehydes through mechanochemistry.

Chemistry - Jun 17

Scientists solve century-old chemistry riddle

When two solutions of oppositely charged polymers (polyelectrolytes) are mixed, phase separation occurs leading to the formation of a polymer-rich phase and a supernatant phase. The precise distribution of all components, that ispolyelectrolytes and counterions, had not yet been determined. Researchers at the University of Twente can now measure quantitatively exactly where these components are distributed using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

Environment - Jun 17

Using radar to study glaciers

Environment

Researchers are using radar to scan the snow and ice on the Jungfraujoch. Sometimes, scaling an icy peak is the only way for scientists to fully understand satellite data.

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Health - Innovation - 18.06.2024
Painless patch for continuous health monitoring
Painless patch for continuous health monitoring
Researchers develop a painless patch for continuous health monitoring. Researchers at two Ontario universities have developed a pain-free, wearable sensor that can continuously monitor levels of blood sugar, lactates and other critical health indicators for weeks at a time, sending results to a smartphone or other device.

Pharmacology - 18.06.2024
Psoriasis Probe shows high level of arthritis symptoms in patients
Psoriasis Probe shows high level of arthritis symptoms in patients
Early results of an international study examining the risk of arthritis for people with psoriasis have shown a high burden of joint symptoms in 712 patients - 25% of the total studied so far. But the team are still on the hunt for 2,000 more patients with psoriasis, a condition that causes flaky patches of skin covered with white scales which affects about 3% of people in the UK and Europe.

Music - 18.06.2024
The 'Queen of the Night' does not whistle
The ’Queen of the Night’ does not whistle
New findings about the sound production mechanism of ultra-high-pitched operatic singing Opera singers have to use the extreme limits of their voice range. Many pedagogical and scientific sources suggest that the highest pitches reached in classical singing can only be produced with a so-called "whistle" voice register, in analogy to ultrasonic vocalizations of mice and rats.

Microtechnics - Astronomy / Space - 17.06.2024
Engineers unlock design for record-breaking robot that could jump twice the height of Big Ben
Manchester engineers unlock design for record-breaking robot that could jump twice the height of Big Ben Engineers at The University of Manchester have unlocked the secrets to designing a robot capable of jumping 200 metres - higher than any other jumping robot designed to date. Using a combination of mathematics, computer simulations, and laboratory experiments, the researchers have discovered how to design a robot with the optimum size, shape and the arrangement of its parts, allowing it to jump high enough to clear obstacles many times its own size.

Environment - Chemistry - 17.06.2024
’Forever chemicals’ found in English otters
New research by Cardiff University's Otter Project has found that PFAS, also known as 'forever chemicals', present in English otters, raising concerns about potential health impacts in the future. The Cardiff scientists tested otters from across the UK to monitor levels of PFAS in the environment, to gain an understanding of the concentration of these chemicals in the UK's freshwaters, their persistence in the environment and any ecological and health risks.

Environment - 17.06.2024
Understanding the Green Sahara’s Collapse
TUM Scientists Develop New Method for Early Detection of Climate Tipping Points Abrupt shifts within complex systems such as the Earth's climate system are extremely hard to predict. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) have now succeeded in developing a new method to anticipate such tipping points in advance.

Chemistry - Environment - 17.06.2024
Golden Ball Mills as Green Catalysts
Golden Ball Mills as Green Catalysts
Less waste, mild reaction conditions, and no harmful solvents - only a very thin layer of gold is necessary to sustainably convert alcohols into aldehydes through mechanochemistry. A gold-coated milling vessel for ball mills proved to be a real marvel in the research work by Inorganic Chemistry at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany: Without any solvents or environmentally harmful chemicals, the team led by Professor Lars Borchardt was able to use it to convert alcohols into aldehydes.

Physics - Chemistry - 17.06.2024
The nanotechnological revolution requires standardised 'screws' - here is a way to measure them
The nanotechnological revolution requires standardised ’screws’ - here is a way to measure them
Physicists at the University of Bath lead on the discovery of a new optical property that measures the twist in tiny helices. A new nonlinear optical property of tiny particles has been discovered by an international team of scientists led by physicists at the University of Bath, with important implications for researchers working in fields as diverse as display technology, chemical catalysis and medicine.

Chemistry - Campus - 17.06.2024
Scientists solve century-old chemistry riddle
When two solutions of oppositely charged polymers (polyelectrolytes) are mixed, phase separation occurs leading to the formation of a polymer-rich phase and a supernatant phase. The precise distribution of all components, that is polyelectrolytes and counterions, had not yet been determined. Researchers at the University of Twente can now measure quantitatively exactly where these components are distributed using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

Health - 17.06.2024
Your bra size is affecting how much you sweat, and it's not what you'd think
Your bra size is affecting how much you sweat, and it’s not what you’d think
A study by the University of Southampton has revealed a surprising link between breast size and the amount of sweat produced by the breast during exercise. The study looked at 22 women of different ages and breast sizes while they ran in a warm climatic chamber - measuring how much sweat they produced across the breast, how much heat their bodies were producing and how many sweat glands they had on different parts of their breasts.

Environment - 17.06.2024
Using radar to study glaciers
Using radar to study glaciers
Researchers are using radar to scan the snow and ice on the Jungfraujoch. Sometimes, scaling an icy peak is the only way for scientists to fully understand satellite data. Glacier melt is just one of the topics the researchers are here to study. They are also developing new radar methods to directly measure the thickness of the snow cover.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 17.06.2024
The role of brain connections in insomnia explained
The role of brain connections in insomnia explained
Insomnia is a common problem that also increases the risk of depression. Unfortunately, we do not yet sufficiently understand the underlying neurobiological mechanisms. Research by neuroscientist Tom Bresser shows that the white matter in the brain, which connects different brain areas, differs in people with insomnia compared to people without sleep problems.

Computer Science - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.06.2024
AI shows how field crops develop
AI shows how field crops develop
Tool developed at the University of Bonn should enable yield forecasts, among other things, in the future Researchers at the University of Bonn have developed software that can simulate the growth of field crops. To do this, they fed thousands of photos from field experiments into a learning algorithm.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 17.06.2024
High-precision measurements challenge the understanding of Cepheids
High-precision measurements challenge the understanding of Cepheids
Scientists, through the VELOCE project, have clocked the speed of Cepheid stars - "standard candles" that help us measure the size of the universe - with unprecedented precision, offering exciting new insights about them. Photo: RS Puppis , one of the most luminous Cepheid variable star s, rhythmically brightens and dims over a six-week cycle.

Chemistry - Pharmacology - 17.06.2024
A smarter way to streamline drug discovery
The SPARROW algorithm automatically identifies the best molecules to test as potential new medicines, given the vast number of factors affecting each choice. The use of AI to streamline drug discovery is exploding. Researchers are deploying machine-learning models to help them identify molecules, among billions of options, that might have the properties they are seeking to develop new medicines.

Computer Science - Innovation - 17.06.2024
Meet the Trojan-Hunting SEI Researchers Improving Computer Vision
People use computer vision every day -  to unlock a smartphone, receive notifications when a package has arrived on their doorstep, or check the speed limit on the dashboard of their car. But computers do not see the same way humans do - they process information like edges, colors or patterns and interpret what the image is.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.06.2024
A 'pseudo-prion' molecule protects the brain from Alzheimer's disease in mice
A ’pseudo-prion’ molecule protects the brain from Alzheimer’s disease in mice
A research team 1 led by scientists from CNRS and Université Grenoble Alpes has discovered that the injection of a modified "pseudo-prion" protein into the brains of mice could protect the animals against Alzheimer's disease, a pathology that currently affects nearly a million people in France. This neurodegenerative disease originates from lesions caused by an abnormal accumulation in the brain of two proteins: amyloid- and Tau.

Astronomy / Space - 14.06.2024
Exceptional Black Hole Discovered in the Milky Way
Exceptional Black Hole Discovered in the Milky Way
Heidelberg researchers played a leading role in evaluating the data from the Gaia space observatory A mere 2,000 light years from Earth lies a black hole approximately 33 times the mass of the sun. The object known as Gaia BH3 - the most massive black hole ever discovered in the Milky Way - was detected with the aid of the Gaia space observatory of the European Space Agency (ESA).

Politics - 14.06.2024
Impact of Russian social media campaigns less pronounced than often assumed
Impact of Russian social media campaigns less pronounced than often assumed
War-related disinformation most effective among conspiracy-minded people Most people do not believe the disinformation spread by Russia about the war in Ukraine, even if they regularly use social media. Instead, the decisive factor in the efficacy of this propaganda is whether a person is fundamentally receptive to conspiracy narratives.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.06.2024
The genetic 'switches' of bone growth
The genetic ’switches’ of bone growth
Scientists at the University of Geneva have identified the genetic sequences that regulate the activity of the genes responsible for bone growth. In mammals, only 3% of the genome consists of coding genes which, when transcribed into proteins, ensure the biological functions of the organism and the in-utero development of future individuals.
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