Chemistry - May 20
The chemical composition of the Earth's mantle is a lot more variable and diverse than previously thought, a new study has revealed. According to a new analysis of cores drilled through the ocean crust, the mantle is made up of distinct sections of rock each with different chemical make-ups. The chemical composition of the mantle has been notoriously difficult to determine with a high degree of certainty because it is largely inaccessible.
Astronomy - May 20
Astronomy

The Earth is unique in our solar system: It is the only terrestrial planet with a large amount of water and a relatively large moon, which stabilizes the Earth's axis.

Health - May 20

Does your cat live indoors' Researchers from the University of Bristol Vet School want to hear from indoor cat owners for a new study looking at cats' mobility levels using cat activity monitors. The researchers want to study the effect of joint disease on cats' activity levels by using activity monitors to measure the movements of cats with and without mobility problems.

Pharmacology - May 20

For a drug to intervene in cells or entire organs that are not behaving normally, it must first bind to specific protein receptors in the cell membranes. Receptors can change their molecular structure in a multitude of ways during binding - and only the right structure will “unlock” the drug's therapeutic effect.

Life Sciences - May 20
Life Sciences

Tissue engineering could transform medicine. Instead of waiting for our bodies to regrow or repair damage after an injury or disease, scientists could grow complex, fully functional tissues in a laboratory for transplantation into patients.


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Chemistry - 18:05
More detailed picture of Earth’s mantle
The chemical composition of the Earth's mantle is a lot more variable and diverse than previously thought, a new study has revealed. According to a new analysis of cores drilled through the ocean crust, the mantle is made up of distinct sections of rock each with different chemical make-ups. The chemical composition of the mantle has been notoriously difficult to determine with a high degree of certainty because it is largely inaccessible.

Astronomy / Space Science - 17:04
Formation of the moon brought water to earth
Formation of the moon brought water to earth
The Earth is unique in our solar system: It is the only terrestrial planet with a large amount of water and a relatively large moon, which stabilizes the Earth's axis. Both were essential for Earth to develop life. Planetologists at the University of Münster have now been able to show, for the first time, that water came to Earth with the formation of the Moon some 4.4 billion years ago.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 16:36
New method simplifies the search for protein receptor complexes, speeding drug development
For a drug to intervene in cells or entire organs that are not behaving normally, it must first bind to specific protein receptors in the cell membranes. Receptors can change their molecular structure in a multitude of ways during binding - and only the right structure will “unlock” the drug's therapeutic effect.

Health - 16:35
Using activity monitors to track cats’ activity levels
Does your cat live indoors' Researchers from the University of Bristol Vet School want to hear from indoor cat owners for a new study looking at cats' mobility levels using cat activity monitors. The researchers want to study the effect of joint disease on cats' activity levels by using activity monitors to measure the movements of cats with and without mobility problems.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 12:08
Scientists use molecular tethers and chemical 'light sabers' to construct platforms for tissue engineering
Scientists use molecular tethers and chemical ’light sabers’ to construct platforms for tissue engineering
Tissue engineering could transform medicine. Instead of waiting for our bodies to regrow or repair damage after an injury or disease, scientists could grow complex, fully functional tissues in a laboratory for transplantation into patients. Proteins are key to this future. In our bodies, protein signals tell cells where to go, when to divide and what to do.

History / Archeology - 11:32
Facial reconstruction breathes new life into ancient citizens of Sagalassos
A look into the past. It's usually just a metaphor, but archaeologists Jeroen Poblome and Sam Cleymans have made it a physical reality. Together with the University of Burdur, Turkey, they have reconstructed the faces of two centuries-old residents of Sagalassos. For over thirty years, KU Leuven researchers have been examining the archaeological site of Sagalassos with an international and interdisciplinary team.

Health - Life Sciences - 09:30
A new non-invasive therapy for people with paraplegia
A new non-invasive therapy for people with paraplegia
Researchers from the Alberto Santos Dumont Association for Research Support (AASDAP) in Brazil, in collaboration with EPFL, have developed a non-invasive strategy that combines functional electrostimulation and a brain-machine interface to help people with paraplegia walk again. This rehabilitation approach was tested on two patients, who showed an improvement in their motor skills and a partial neurological recovery.

Pedagogy - 19.05.2019
The negative impact of positive Ofsted ratings
As GCSE exam season starts this week, new research has found a positive Ofsted rating can have a surprising negative impact on students. Parents with kids in schools that received a better than expected Ofsted report are much more likely to reduce help with homework and this can have a damaging impact on GCSE results.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.05.2019
’Stepped’ treatment reduces drinking in patients with HIV
People with HIV who drink too much were more likely to reduce drinking after undergoing an approach to care known as integrated stepped alcohol treatment, according to a Yale-led study. The finding supports greater use of this treatment model in HIV clinics to improve outcomes for patients with both HIV and drinking problems, the researchers said.

Environment - 17.05.2019
Satellites yield insight into not so permanent permafrost
Satellites yield insight into not so permanent permafrost
17 May 2019 Ice is without doubt one of the first casualties of climate change, but the effects of our warming world are not only limited to ice melting on Earth's surface. Ground that has been frozen for thousands of years is also thawing, adding to the climate crisis and causing immediate problems for local communities.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 17.05.2019
Mission control 'saves science'
Mission control ’saves science’
17 May 2019 Every minute, ESA's Earth observation satellites gather dozens of gigabytes of data about our planet - enough information to fill the pages on a 100-metre long bookshelf. Flying in low-Earth orbits, these spacecraft are continuously taking the pulse of our planet, but it's teams on the ground at ESA's Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany, that keep these explorers afloat.

Health - 17.05.2019
New Findings on Malaria Vaccine
New Findings on Malaria Vaccine
Protection by the malaria vaccine RTS,S is not only a matter of antibody quantity but also of quality. These are the findings of a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) in collaboration with Swiss TPH and other partners. The research show for the first time that the higher the avidity of antibodies induced by the RTS,S vaccine, the greater the protection.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.05.2019
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms, new research suggests An important class of drug used to treat cancer patients could be used to treat brain aneurysms, according to new research published this week. Brain aneurysms are a bulge in a blood vessel caused by a weakness in the blood vessel wall.

History / Archeology - Computer Science / Telecom - 17.05.2019
Historian Prof. Torsten Hiltmann aims to make use of machine learning for medieval research
Historian Prof. Torsten Hiltmann aims to make use of machine learning for medieval research
Centuries-old manuscripts, documents and heraldic images: at first glance, medieval research and artificial intelligence seem to be a contradiction in terms. After all, historical studies and the like were long seen as being subjects greatly removed from the world of IT. However, methods such as machine learning on the part of computer programmes, which learn new things and correct themselves, open up new opportunities for historians doing research.

Life Sciences - 17.05.2019
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex
Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex
International research finds bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago - and walked the earth with T.Rex Bedbugs - some of the most unwanted human bedfellows - have been parasitic companions with other species asides from humans for more than 100 million years, walking the earth at the same time as dinosaurs.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 17.05.2019
Empathic birds
Empathic birds
Raven observers show emotional contagion with raven demonstrators experiencing an unpleasant affect To effectively navigate the social world, we need information about each other's emotions. Emotional contagion has been suggested to facilitate such information transmission, constituting a basic building block of empathy that could also be present in non-human animals.

Palaeontology - 17.05.2019
A high-heeled dinosaur?
A high-heeled dinosaur?
A 24-tonne dinosaur may have walked in a ‘high-heeled' fashion, according to University of Queensland research. UQ PhD candidate Andréas Jannel and colleagues from UQ's Dinosaur Lab analysed fossils of Australia's only named Jurassic sauropod, Rhoetosaurus brownei, to better understand how such an enormous creature could support its own body weight.

Physics - 17.05.2019
Scientists 'paint' Mona Lisa on a quantum canvas
Scientists ’paint’ Mona Lisa on a quantum canvas
The Mona Lisa, Van Gogh's Starry Night and dozens of other images have been recreated on a quantum ‘canvas' the width of a human hair, thanks to University of Queensland physicists. The images were projected and photographed on a blob of gaseous quantum matter known as Bose-Einstein condensate.

Social Sciences - 16.05.2019
Prison time has little or no bearing on long-term public safety
Imprisonment has virtually no effect on violent crime rates, new study finds. (Cartoon by J.D. Crowe/Press Register) Locking away people who have committed assault, robbery and similar felonies may keep them off the streets for a period of time, but it does not affect whether they will commit violent crimes after their release, according to new research from UC Berkeley.

Environment - 16.05.2019
A quarter of glacier ice in West Antarctica is now unstable
A quarter of glacier ice in West Antarctica is now unstable
16 May 2019 By combining 25 years of ESA satellite data, scientists have discovered that warming ocean waters have caused the ice to thin so rapidly that 24% of the glacier ice in West Antarctica is now affected. A paper published in Geophysical Research Letters describes how the UK Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM) used over 800 million measurements of Antarctic ice sheet height recorded by radar altimeter instruments on ESA's ERS-1, ERS-2, Envisat and CryoSat satellite missions between 1992 and 2017.
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