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Environment - Sep 28
Temperatures at Earth's highest latitudes were nearly as warm after Antarctica's polar ice sheets developed as they were prior to glaciation, according to a new study led by Yale University. The finding upends most scientists' basic understanding of how ice and climate develop over long stretches of time.
Life Sciences - Sep 28
Life Sciences

Scientists have observed - for the first time in living cells - the way mitochondria distribute their transcriptome throughout the cell, and it involves RNA granules that turn out to be highly fluid.

Environment - Sep 28
Environment

Orchids may be decorative, but many orchid species are also threatened by land conversion and illegal harvesting.

Politics - Sep 28

From addressing how to vote safely during a pandemic to tackling disinformation and misinformation on social media, Stanford scholars examine the issues and uncertainties facing American voters as they cast their ballot in November's general election.

Environment - Sep 28
Environment

Agroecologists from Göttingen University compare pesticides, fertilisers, manual pollination and farming costs in Indonesia.


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Environment - 28.09.2020
Throwing a warm sheet over our understanding of ice and climate
Temperatures at Earth's highest latitudes were nearly as warm after Antarctica's polar ice sheets developed as they were prior to glaciation, according to a new study led by Yale University. The finding upends most scientists' basic understanding of how ice and climate develop over long stretches of time.

Life Sciences - 28.09.2020
Inside mitochondria and their fascinating genome
Inside mitochondria and their fascinating genome
Scientists have observed - for the first time in living cells - the way mitochondria distribute their transcriptome throughout the cell, and it involves RNA granules that turn out to be highly fluid. Mitochondria are present in all eukaryotic cells: in our cells, in mammalian cells, in the cells of plants and even of fungi.

Politics - Environment - 28.09.2020
The 2020 U.S. election, issues and challenges
From addressing how to vote safely during a pandemic to tackling disinformation and misinformation on social media, Stanford scholars examine the issues and uncertainties facing American voters as they cast their ballot in November's general election.

Environment - 28.09.2020
Artificial Intellegence Can Help Protect Orchids
Artificial Intellegence Can Help Protect Orchids
Orchids may be decorative, but many orchid species are also threatened by land conversion and illegal harvesting. However, only a fraction of those species are included in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, because assessments require a lot of time, resources and expertise. A new approach, an automated assessment developed under the lead of biodiversity researchers from Central Germany, now shows that almost 30 per cent of all orchid species are possibly threatened.

Environment - 28.09.2020
Hand pollination, not agrochemicals, increases cocoa yield and farmer income
Hand pollination, not agrochemicals, increases cocoa yield and farmer income
Agroecologists from Göttingen University compare pesticides, fertilisers, manual pollination and farming costs in Indonesia Cocoa is in great demand on the world market, but there are many different ways to increase production. A research team from the University of Göttingen has now investigated the relative importance of the use of pesticides, fertilisers and manual pollination in a well replicated field trial in Indonesian agroforestry systems.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.09.2020
Looking at evolution's genealogy from home
Looking at evolution’s genealogy from home
As the developers of 2-n-way, Dr. Jürgen Schmitz, Dr. Liliya Doronina, Norbert Grundmann, Fengjun Zhang and Dr. Gennady Churakov (from left) are delighted at the publication of their project in the specialist press. Evolution leaves its traces in particular in genomes. Pinpointing its influence is a laborious process - but one in which Dr. Jürgen Schmitz and his team at the University of Münster are at home.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.09.2020
New technique for ultrafast tumour therapy
New technique for ultrafast tumour therapy
For the first time, researchers at the Centre for Proton Therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Switzerland have tested ultrafast, high-dose irradiation with protons. This new, experimental FLASH technique could revolutionise radiation therapy for cancer and save patients many weeks of treatment.

Health - Campus - 28.09.2020
Long-term COVID-19 containment will be shaped by strength and duration of natural, vaccine-induced immunity
New research suggests that the impact of natural and vaccine-induced immunity will be key factors in shaping the future trajectory of the global coronavirus pandemic, known as COVID-19. In particular, a vaccine capable of eliciting a strong immune response could substantially reduce the future burden of infection, according to a study recently published in the journal Science .

Environment - 28.09.2020
Disastrous duo: heatwaves and droughts
Simultaneous heatwaves and droughts are becoming increasingly common in western parts of the United States, according to a new study led by researchers from McGill University. Periods of dry and hot weather, which can make wildfires more likely, are becoming larger, more intense, and more frequent because of climate change.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 28.09.2020
Busy Pictures Hinder Reading Ability in Children
New CMU study shows extraneous images draw attention from text, reducing comprehension in beginning readers Reading is the gateway for learning, but one-third of elementary school students in the United States do not read at grade level. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are exploring how the design of reading materials affects literacy development.

Health - 28.09.2020
Largest study confirms children significantly less likely to catch Covid-19
Children and young people are around 40% per cent less likely to be infected than adults when exposed to someone with the virus, finds a new study of global Covid-19 transmission data, co-led by UCL researchers. In this study, published in JAMA Pediatrics , the researchers have updated their previous systematic review* and meta-analysis, published as a preprint in May**, to encompass more than 13,900 studies, to understand how likely it is that children catch Covid-19 (known as susceptibility) and whether they pass it on to others (known as transmission or infectiousness).

Health - Pharmacology - 28.09.2020
Researchers’ efforts to combat melanoma gets $13M boost from NIH
UCLA From left: Dr. Antoni Ribas, Thomas Graeber and Dr. Roger Lo, who have been collaborating on cancer research for more than a decade. UCLA researchers have received a $13 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to find new ways to overcome melanoma resistance to some of the most promising targeted therapies and immunotherapies.

Health - 28.09.2020
Comparison of five tests used to detect COVID-19 antibodies shows Siemens and Oxford assays met regulatory targets
New research shows that, in a head-to-head comparison of five tests used to detect COVID-19 antibodies (known as 'immunoassays'), an assay manufactured by Siemens and one developed by an academic partnership led by the University of Oxford had the most accurate results. The study is published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Health - Social Sciences - 28.09.2020
ACA reduced out-of-pocket health costs for families with kids, but they still need help
FINDINGS The percentage of lowand middle-income families with children that had burdensome out-of-pocket health care costs fell following the 2014 implementation of the h ealth i nsurance m arketplaces and Medicaid e xpansion provisions of the Affordable Care Act, known widely as Obamacare , according to a new study by Lauren Wisk, an assistant professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and colleagues.

Environment - 28.09.2020
Ocean water could melt precarious Antarctic glacier
Ocean water could melt precarious Antarctic glacier
Rice helps study threats to Thwaites, a glacier that could add 25 inches to sea level Rice University researchers, alumni and staff are part of an international effort that has discovered a pathway for warm ocean water to melt the underside of Thwaites Glacier, a precarious body of west Antarctic ice that could add as much as 25 inches to global sea level if it were to suffer a runaway collapse.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.09.2020
Last-resort life support option helped majority of critically ill COVID-19 patients survive
It saved lives in past epidemics of lung-damaging viruses. Now, the life-support option known as ECMO appears to be doing the same for many of the critically ill COVID-19 patients who receive it, according to an international study led by a University of Michigan researcher. The 1,035 patients in the study faced a staggeringly high risk of death, as ventilators and other care failed to support their lungs.

Physics - 28.09.2020
Shhh! These Tests Will Enable a Quieter Search for Dark Matter
Shhh! These Tests Will Enable a Quieter Search for Dark Matter
LUX-ZEPLIN collaboration publishes results showing radioactive background levels for experiment's components, creates library for future rare event searches Brianna Mount, assistant professor of physics at Black Hills State University, at work in the Black Hills State University Underground Campus (BHUC) at Sanford Lab, where components of the LUX-ZEPLIN experiment were tested to learn the background radioactivity of the materials.

Environment - 28.09.2020
Protection needed for emerging mining hotspots
Growing demand for metals necessary for the transition to a low carbon future will lead to more mining in high-risk areas, according to University of Queensland research. Dr Éléonore Lèbre and researchers from UQ's Sustainable Minerals Institute identified mining ‘hotspots' by looking at areas where competition over mining resources such as water and land is likely to negatively impact surrounding communities.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.09.2020
Recording thousands of nerve cell impulses at high resolution
Recording thousands of nerve cell impulses at high resolution
Researchers have developed a new generation of microelectrode-array chips for measuring nerve impulses, enabling studies of how thousands of nerve cells interact with each other. For over 15 years, ETH Professor Andreas Hierlemann and his group have been developing microelectrode-array chips that can be used to precisely excite nerve cells in cell cultures and to measure electrical cell activity.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 28.09.2020
The testimony of trees: how volcanic eruptions shaped 2000 years of world history
The testimony of trees: how volcanic eruptions shaped 2000 years of world history
Researchers have shown that over the past two thousand years, volcanoes have played a larger role in natural temperature variability than previously thought, and their climatic effects may have contributed to past societal and economic change. Some climate models assume that the effect of volcanoes is punctuated and short.
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