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Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
24.02.2017
Where do flowers come from? Shedding light on Darwin's ‘abominable mystery'
Where do flowers come from? Shedding light on Darwin’s ‘abominable mystery’
The mystery that is the origin of flowering plants has been partially solved thanks to a team from the Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire et Végétale (CNRS/Inra/CEA/Université Grenoble Alpes), in
Life Sciences
24.02.2017
Where do flowers come from? Shedding light on Darwin's “abominable mystery”
Where do flowers come from? Shedding light on Darwin’s “abominable mystery”
The mystery that is the origin of flowering plants has been partially solved thanks to a team from the Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire et Végétale (CNRS/Inra/CEA/Université Grenoble Alpes), in
Education/Continuing Education
24.02.2017
New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds
Origami-inspired materials use folds in materials to embed powerful functionality. However, all that folding can be pretty labor intensive. Now, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are drawing material inspiration from another ancient Japanese paper craft - kirigami.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
24.02.2017
Study offers hope of new treatment for rheumatoid arthritis
Patients who do not respond to current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatments may benefit from a new form of treatment that has been shown in a study to be effective against symptoms of the disease. The RA-BEAM study is the first to demonstrate that the drug baricitinib is more effective in improving the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis than the current standard treatment of injectable biologic anti-TNF medications.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
24.02.2017
In the molecular bench vise
In the molecular bench vise
Research news The genome molecule contains the blueprint for life. The manner in which the blueprint is packed into the cell determines which genes are active and which are set to inactive. Disturbing this structure can result in illnesses such as cancer. Munich scientists have now succeeded in using molecular "tweezers" made from DNA to measure interactions at the first packaging level of the genome.
Chemistry - Environment/Sustainable Development
24.02.2017
Getting Rid of the Last Bits of Sulfur in Fuel
Getting Rid of the Last Bits of Sulfur in Fuel
Scientists led by a team at Caltech have developed a new method for potentially removing nearly all sulfur compounds from gas and diesel fuel. Sulfur compounds in fuels such as gasoline and diesel create air pollution when the fuel is burned. To address that challenge, large-scale oil refinery processes remove the majority of sulfur from fuel down to a government-mandated level.
Media - Environment/Sustainable Development
24.02.2017
’Computer bots are like humans, having fights lasting years’
Researchers say 'benevolent bots', otherwise known as software robots, that are designed to make articles on Wikipedia better often end up having online fights lasting years over changes in content. Editing bots on Wikipedia undo vandalism, enforce bans, check spelling, create links and import content automatically, whereas other bots (which are non-editing) can mine data, identify data or identify copyright infringements.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
24.02.2017
Rare bacterial infection a threat to heart patients
A Queensland infectious diseases expert has warned more open-heart surgery patients could be diagnosed with a rare bacterial infection stemming from contaminated heater-cooler units. from the Mater Research Institute - University of Queensland (MRI-UQ) has diagnosed and treated a 68-year-old woman with Mycobacterium chimaera 13 months after she had open cardiothoracic surgery.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.02.2017
Study suggests air pollution's risk to the heart may stem from the gut
Study suggests air pollution’s risk to the heart may stem from the gut
New research from UCLA suggests air pollution, well known to have negative health effects on the lungs and heart, may also cause damage to other systems in the body. The team of researchers, led by Dr. Tzung Hsiai, professor of medicine and bioengineering at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA , found that exposure to air pollution caused mice to experience changes in the normal composition of gut bacteria.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2017
How blood can be rejuvenated
How blood can be rejuvenated
Our blood stem cells generate around a thousand billion new blood cells every day. But the blood stem cells' capacity to produce blood changes as we age. This leads to older people being more susceptible to anaemia, lowered immunity and a greater risk of developing certain kinds of blood cancer. Now for the first time, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has succeeded in rejuvenating blood stem cells with established reduced function in aging mice.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
23.02.2017
UC San Diego Astrophysicists Contribute to Major Planet Discovery
The announcement yesterday that NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope had revealed the first known system of seven Earth-size planets around a single star may be the biggest news of the year for the space agency. But it wasn't only big news at NASA's headquarters in Washington, D.C., where a press conference was held Wednesday afternoon to publicize the achievement.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.02.2017
Mouse Model Could Shed New Light on Immune System Response to Zika Virus
A new mouse model with a working immune system could be used in laboratory research to improve understanding of Zika virus infection and aid development of new treatments, according to a study published in PLOS Pathogens . A new mouse model with a working immune system could be used in laboratory research to improve understanding of Zika virus infection and aid development of new treatments, according to a study published in PLOS Pathogens .
Agronomy/Food Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2017
Long-term stress linked to higher levels of obesity
Long-term stress linked to higher levels of obesity
People who suffer long-term stress may also be more prone to obesity, according to research by scientists at UCL which involved examining hair samples for levels of cortisol, a hormone which regulates the body's response to stress. The paper, published in the journal Obesity , showed that exposure to higher levels of cortisol over several months is associated with people being more heavily, and more persistently, overweight.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2017
Faster biological ageing could increase risk for depression in childhood
Genetic factors which predispose people to accelerated ‘biological ageing' also increase their risk of developing depression in childhood, according to a new study from King's College London. The findings, published today in the Journal of Affective Disorders , suggest that the causes of childhood-onset depression may be different from those of adult-onset depression, and could lead to new treatments targeting the mechanisms which govern biological ageing.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2017
Artificial intelligence could increase speed and reliability of brain research
Artificial intelligence could increase speed and reliability of brain research
Neuroscientists at Imperial have highlighted the benefits of using machine learning techniques in real-time brain imaging studies. The researchers say the technique, which uses artificial intelligence (AI) to automatically design the best possible experiment, could improve the results from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, a neuroimaging technique that creates images of activity levels in different brain regions.
Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2017
Alzheimer’s drug prescribed ‘off-label’ for mild cognitive impairment could be dangerous for some
FINDINGS Donepezil, a medication that is approved to treat people with Alzheimer's disease, should not be prescribed for people with mild cognitive impairment without a genetic test. UCLA School of Nursing researchers discovered that for people who carry a specific genetic variation — the K-variant of butyrylcholinesterase, or BChE-K — donezpezil could accelerate cognitive decline.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.02.2017
Research suggests a new model of chronic disease
Genes play a key role in determining whether someone experiences multiple chronic diseases, according to new research by King's. Chronic pain, depression and heart disease are three of the commonest causes of disability, and are becoming more prevalent. People are also increasingly likely to suffer from more than one chronic disease, resulting in greater disability.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.02.2017
New study identifies possible early warning signs of Huntington's disease
New study identifies possible early warning signs of Huntington’s disease
Early warning signs of Huntington's disease have been uncovered in a sheep carrying the human disease-causing genetic variant, providing new insights into this devastating illness, a new study in Scientific Reports has found. Despite its devastating impacts on patients and their families, there are currently limited treatments options, and no cure for Huntington's disease Jenny Morton Researchers from the University of Cambridge and University of Surrey have identified early biomarkers of disease during examinations of Huntington's disease sheep still at a pre-symptomatic stage of the disease.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2017
Fructose is generated in the human brain
Fructose is generated in the human brain
Fructose, a form of sugar linked to obesity and diabetes, is converted in the human brain from glucose, according to a new Yale study. The finding raises questions about fructose's effects on the brain and eating behavior. The study was published on Feb. 23 by JCI Insight. Fructose is a simple sugar found in fruits, vegetables, table sugar, and many processed foods.
Astronomy - Earth Sciences
23.02.2017
Space dust deploy bubble parachutes on their fiery descent, scientists discover
Space dust deploy bubble parachutes on their fiery descent, scientists discover
Bubbles acting like parachutes are deployed by some cosmic dust particles on their entry into Earth's atmosphere, preventing them from burning up. Think of microscopic rice bubbles made of molten rock and you get the picture about what this cosmic dust looks like. – Dr Matt Genge Department of Earth Science and Engineering This is the conclusion of a new study carried out by a researcher from Imperial College London.
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