Environment - Nov 14
( 14-11-2018 ) Researchers of Ghent University are teaching Ghanaian cocoa farmers how to produce better and more cocoa beans in a sustainable way. With a share of 20% of the premium cocoa beans on the international market, Ghana plays a significant role in the global cocoa production. However, the last couple of years Ghana has suffered low productivity rate and limited profit margins in its cocoa production.
Health - Nov 14

Researchers at the University of Glasgow are collaborating with Malawian scientists to try to find out why some people in Malawi develop type 2 diabetes - even though many are slim and highly active.

Physics - Nov 13
Physics

In optics, the era of glass lenses may be waning. In recent years, physicists and engineers have been designing, constructing and testing different types of ultrathin materials that could replace the thick glass lenses used today in cameras and imaging systems.

Life Sciences - Nov 14

The scorpion Kolotl magnus from Guerrero, Mexico. UW-Madison scientists have made a fresh attempt to untangle the scorpion family tree using not the shape and structure of the arachnids' bodies, but the shape of their venom.

Health - Nov 13

EPFL scientists have discovered how a dysfunction in the immune system can cause an overload of a gut bacterium.


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Environment - 16:01
Ghent University boosts sustainable cocoa cultivation in Ghana
( 14-11-2018 ) Researchers of Ghent University are teaching Ghanaian cocoa farmers how to produce better and more cocoa beans in a sustainable way. With a share of 20% of the premium cocoa beans on the international market, Ghana plays a significant role in the global cocoa production. However, the last couple of years Ghana has suffered low productivity rate and limited profit margins in its cocoa production.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 07:03
Preventing type 2 diabetes in Malawi
Researchers at the University of Glasgow are collaborating with Malawian scientists to try to find out why some people in Malawi develop type 2 diabetes - even though many are slim and highly active. Worldwide, diabetes is on the rise with almost 400 million people living with the disease - a figure that is predicted to rise to about 600 million in 2035.

Life Sciences - 14.11.2018
Venom shape untangles scorpion family tree
The scorpion Kolotl magnus from Guerrero, Mexico. UW-Madison scientists have made a fresh attempt to untangle the scorpion family tree using not the shape and structure of the arachnids' bodies, but the shape of their venom. Carlos Santibáñez-López As a child growing up in Mexico, Carlos Santibáñez-López feared the scorpions that would often decorate the walls and ceilings of his home in search of a warm place with plenty of food.

Physics / Materials Science - 13.11.2018
Scientists engineer a functional optical lens out of 2D materials
Scientists engineer a functional optical lens out of 2D materials
In optics, the era of glass lenses may be waning. In recent years, physicists and engineers have been designing, constructing and testing different types of ultrathin materials that could replace the thick glass lenses used today in cameras and imaging systems. Critically, these engineered lenses - known as metalenses - are not made of glass.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.11.2018
Immunity connects gut bacteria and aging
EPFL scientists have discovered how a dysfunction in the immune system can cause an overload of a gut bacterium. The bacterium produces excess lactic acid, which in turn triggers the production of reactive oxygen species that cause damage to cells and many age-related pathologies. There is no doubt that gut bacteria have become one of the most important focuses of biological and medical research today.

Environment - Administration - 13.11.2018
What do the midterm results mean for environmental policyα
New opportunities for environmental protection and serious discussions about infrastructure could be among the ripple effects of the midterm election results.   The recent midterm elections could have far-reaching implications for the direction of federaland state-level environment and energy policy.

Psychology - Careers / Employment - 13.11.2018
Emotional intelligence: a new criterion for hiring
Emotional intelligence: a new criterion for hiring
Researchers have developed an emotional intelligence test for the workplace that can be used to assess and predict an employee's abilities in interpersonal relations and leadership capabilities.

Health - 13.11.2018
Neck scan could predict risk of developing cognitive decline
Neck scan could predict risk of developing cognitive decline
A five-minute scan of blood vessels in the neck during mid-life could predict cognitive decline ten years before symptoms appear, claims new UCL research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF). The findings were presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions conference in Chicago. If confirmed in larger studies, the scan could become part of routine screening programme for people at risk of developing dementia.

Innovation / Technology - 13.11.2018
‘Ground-breaking' great ape activity device revealed at Bristol Zoo Gardens
‘Ground-breaking’ great ape activity device revealed at Bristol Zoo Gardens
A team of scientists from the University of Bristol and Bristol Zoological Society have collaborated to develop a 'ground-breaking' new animal enrichment activity for the gorillas at Bristol Zoo Gardens. The project integrates hidden computer technology with cognitive animal enrichment for the first time, to measure how gorillas solve complicated problems.

Music - Life Sciences - 13.11.2018
Resonant mechanism discovery could inspire ultra-thin acoustic absorbers
Resonant mechanism discovery could inspire ultra-thin acoustic absorbers
New research led by academics at the University of Bristol has discovered that the scales on moth wings vibrate and can absorb the sound frequencies used by bats for echolocation (biological sonar). The finding could help researchers develop bioinspired thin and lightweight resonant sound absorbers.

Environment - Administration - 13.11.2018
Climate Scenarios CH2018: the warming continues
Climate Scenarios CH2018: the warming continues
Switzerland is becoming drier, hotter and less snowy, and will struggle with heavier rainfall in the future - these are the conclusions reached by climate researchers from MeteoSwiss and ETH Zurich.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.11.2018
Team determines how cholesterol moves inside cells
Team determines how cholesterol moves inside cells
FINDINGS The researchers found that high-density lipoprotein, or HDL, sometimes referred to as “good” cholesterol, is transported from the outer wall to the interior of cells by a protein that helps create a “bridge” between the two areas. BACKGROUND HDL cholesterol has been linked for years to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease.

Music - Innovation / Technology - 13.11.2018

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics / Materials Science - 13.11.2018
Once-In-A-Lifetime Observations by Veritas Astronomers Reveal High Energy Gamma-Rays from a Binary Star System
Once-In-A-Lifetime Observations by Veritas Astronomers Reveal High Energy Gamma-Rays from a Binary Star System
A new discovery reported in the Astrophysical Journal Letters might lay claim to title of the most unusual extreme class of astronomical object: very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emitting, neutron star-massive star binary pairs. Of the one-hundred billion stars in our galaxy, fewer than ten are in known to be in gamma-ray binary systems, with this discovery being only the second with an identified neutron star.

Astronomy / Space Science - 13.11.2018
Gaia spots a 'ghost' galaxy next door
Gaia spots a ’ghost’ galaxy next door
The Gaia satellite has spotted an enormous 'ghost' galaxy lurking on the outskirts of the Milky Way.  When we looked closer, it turned out we found something new Vasily Belokurov An international team of astronomers, including from the University of Cambridge, discovered the massive object when trawling through data from the European Space Agency's Gaia satellite.

Health - 13.11.2018
A new model calculates infection risks from water
A new model calculates infection risks from water
Again and again it happens that humans fall ill with diarrhoea or have to vomit because they have come into contact with virus-contaminated liquids.

Astronomy / Space Science - 13.11.2018
Enormous 'ghost' galaxy spotted hiding next to the Milky Way
Enormous ’ghost’ galaxy spotted hiding next to the Milky Way
A galaxy a third the size of our own, but extremely faint, has been observed orbiting around the Milky Way. An international team, including an astronomer from Imperial College London, discovered the massive galaxy when trawling through data from the European Space Agency's Gaia satellite. Despite its size, the galaxy has very few stars, challenging conventional theories of galaxy formation.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 12.11.2018
Over half a million people take part in largest ever study of psychological sex differences and autistic traits
Over half a million people take part in largest ever study of psychological sex differences and autistic traits
Scientists at the University of Cambridge have completed the world's largest ever study of typical sex differences and autistic traits. They tested and confirmed two long-standing psychological theories: the Empathising-Systemising theory of sex differences and the Extreme Male Brain theory of autism.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.11.2018
Poxvirus hijacks cell movement to spread infection
Poxvirus hijacks cell movement to spread infection
Prospective students Current students Vaccinia virus, a poxvirus closely related to smallpox and monkeypox, tricks cells it has infected into activating their own cell movement mechanism to rapidly spread the virus in cells and mice, according to a new UCL-led study. The findings explain how the virus mimics infected cells' own proteins to kick-start the signalling pathway enabling the cell to move around.

Physics / Materials Science - Chemistry - 12.11.2018
Structure of fossil-fuel source rocks is finally decoded
Structure of fossil-fuel source rocks is finally decoded
Detailed 3-D imaging of kerogen, a source of petroleum and natural gas, could improve estimates of recoverable amounts. The fossil fuels that provide much of the world's energy orginate in a type of rock known as kerogen, and the potential for recovering these fuels depends crucially on the size and connectedness of the rocks' internal pore spaces.
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