Life Sciences Apr 27
The biggest study of its kind has allowed researchers to identify genetic risk factors associated with major depression, providing new insights for prevention and treatment. Australian researchers, including Professor Naomi Wray from The University of Queensland, are now seeking volunteers who have been diagnosed with clinical depression to help build on this study to make further advances into the genetics behind the common disorder.
Medicine Apr 27

Exposure to general anaesthetic up to age 4 raises the risk of poor child development and reduced literacy and numeracy as measured by school tests, new research led by the University of Sydney reveals.

Medicine Apr 26

Researchers today generally agree that eating garlic, used for thousands of years to treat human disease, can reduce the risk of developing certain kinds of cancers, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes, but exactly how it does this is a still a mystery that needs more research.

Physics Apr 26
Physics

Physicists from the University of Basel have observed the quantum mechanical Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in a system of several hundred interacting atoms for the first time.

Life Sciences Apr 26
Life Sciences

Horse lookin' at you kid: study finds horses remember facial expressions of people they've seen before.


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Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
27.04.2018
Volunteers sought for genetic depression risk research
The biggest study of its kind has allowed researchers to identify genetic risk factors associated with major depression, providing new insights for prevention and treatment. Australian researchers, including Professor Naomi Wray from The University of Queensland, are now seeking volunteers who have been diagnosed with clinical depression to help build on this study to make further advances into the genetics behind the common disorder.
Medicine/Pharmacology
27.04.2018
Kids exposed to general anaesthetic do poorer on numeracy, literacy tests
Exposure to general anaesthetic up to age 4 raises the risk of poor child development and reduced literacy and numeracy as measured by school tests, new research led by the University of Sydney reveals. The new finding published today in Pediatric Anesthesia, is based on a data-linkage study of over 210,000 children in New South Wales, Australia.
Physics/Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
26.04.2018
Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox observed in many-particle system for the first time
Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox observed in many-particle system for the first time
Physicists from the University of Basel have observed the quantum mechanical Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in a system of several hundred interacting atoms for the first time. The phenomenon dates back to a famous thought experiment from 1935. It allows measurement results to be predicted precisely and could be used in new types of sensors and imaging methods for electromagnetic fields.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
26.04.2018
The complicated biology of garlic
Researchers today generally agree that eating garlic, used for thousands of years to treat human disease, can reduce the risk of developing certain kinds of cancers, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes, but exactly how it does this is a still a mystery that needs more research.
Life Sciences
26.04.2018
Horse lookin' at you kid: study finds horses remember facial expressions of people they've seen before
Horse lookin’ at you kid: study finds horses remember facial expressions of people they’ve seen before
Horse lookin' at you kid: study finds horses remember facial expressions of people they've seen before A study by the Universities of Sussex and Portsmouth reveals that horses can read and then remember people's emotional expressions, enabling them to use this information to identify people who could pose a potential threat.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.04.2018
Can microbes manipulate our minds?
Researchers at the University of Oxford have proposed an evolutionary framework to understand why microbes living in the gut affect the brain and behaviour, published.  Katerina Johnson (Department of Experimental Psychology) and Kevin Foster (Department of Zoology) assessed data from studies on the gut-brain axis to suggest how 'that gut feeling' evolved.
Physics/Materials Science - Astronomy
26.04.2018
New eyes on Mars
New eyes on Mars
The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter has returned the first images of the Red Planet from its new orbit. The spacecraft arrived in a near-circular 400 km altitude orbit a few weeks ago ahead of its primary goal to seek out gases that may be linked to active geological or biological activity on Mars. The orbiter's Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System, CaSSIS, took this stunning image, which features part of an impact crater, during the instrument's test period.
Astronomy - Life Sciences
26.04.2018
ESA and NASA to investigate bringing martian soil to Earth
ESA and NASA to investigate bringing martian soil to Earth
ESA and NASA signed a statement of intent today to explore concepts for missions to bring samples of martian soil to Earth. Spacecraft in orbit and on Mars's surface have made many exciting discoveries, transforming our understanding of the planet and unveiling clues to the formation of our Solar System, as well as helping us understand our home planet.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
26.04.2018
Improving mid-infrared imaging and sensing
Improving mid-infrared imaging and sensing
A new way of taking images in the mid-infrared part of the spectrum, developed by researchers at MIT and elsewhere, could enable a wide variety of applications, including thermal imaging, biomedical sensing, and free-space communication. The mid-infrared (mid-IR) band of electromagnetic radiation is a particularly useful part of the spectrum; it can provide imaging in the dark, trace heat signatures, and provide sensitive detection of many biomolecular and chemical signals.
Astronomy
26.04.2018
Bernese Mars camera CaSSIS sends first colour images from Mars
Bernese Mars camera CaSSIS sends first colour images from Mars
The Mars camera CaSSIS on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter has returned its first colour images of the red planet.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Astronomy
26.04.2018
UW researcher to send cotton into space to improve its growth on Earth
Jeans are thirsty. The fibers making up their denim come from water-guzzling cotton plants, and plant scientists are on the hunt for ways to make this vital fiber more sustainable. So, naturally, they're sending cotton plants into space. Simon Gilroy, professor of botany at UW-Madison, meets with his graduate students in Birge Hall in March 2018.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.04.2018
Double trouble for a coral reef
Double trouble for a coral reef
Upolu, one of the nine islands of Samoa, in the Pacific Ocean. Well-known among fans of diving, this isolated coral reef promised to be a site of rich biodiversity for the scientists on the Tara Pacific expedition, principally from the CNRS, the CEA 1 and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
26.04.2018
Community efforts to prevent teen problems have lasting benefits
Community efforts to prevent teen problems have lasting benefits
Want to prevent kids from using drugs and make it stick into young adulthood? Get the community involved and intervene before they're teens, say researchers from the University of Washington. A new, longitudinal study from the UW Social Development Research Group shows that young adults who grew up in communities that used a coordinated, science-based approach to prevention were more likely to have abstained from substance use, violence and other antisocial behaviors through age 21.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
26.04.2018
Traces in scrap
Traces in scrap
Last year Empa's inorganic analytics lab was granted the status of "Reference Laboratory" within the scope of the ProSUM project, funded by the EU. Fine-grained samples of shredder waste from scrapped cars, e-waste or mine dumps from all over Europe end up here. Empa chemists find out what is in them, what is worth extracting and what could be dangerous for staff at recycling plants.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.04.2018
E. coli rewired to control growth as experts let them make proteins for medicine
Experts have equipped biotech workhorse bacteria with feedback control mechanism to balance growth with making protein products. Medicines like insulin and interferon are manufactured using genetically engineered bacteria, such as E. coli. E. coli grow quickly and can be given DNA that instructs them to make proteins used in medicines and other materials.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Agronomy/Food Science
26.04.2018
Keeping the soil fit
Keeping the soil fit
Erosion, compaction and a loss of humus and biodiversity are afflicting the soil, thereby endangering the many services it offers for humans and the environment.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Media
26.04.2018
Cancer risk in over 60s underrepresented despite high diagnosis rates
Older adults are largely obscured in the media representation of cancer and cancer experience, despite over three quarters of all cancers in the UK diagnosed in those aged over 60. The research, led by the University of Glasgow and funded by Cancer Research UK, found that articles featuring personal cancer stories more frequently focus on younger people.
Medicine/Pharmacology
26.04.2018
Genetic link to devastating epilepsies
Families of children with severe epilepsies may be able to avoid having a second child born with the devastating disease, according to a research breakthrough published in The New England Journal of Medicine . Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies are severe disorders that begin in infancy or childhood and lead to uncontrolled epilepsy and intellectual disability.
Medicine/Pharmacology
26.04.2018
Genetic link to devasting epilepsies
Families of children with severe epilepsies may be able to avoid having a second child born with the devastating disease, according to a research breakthrough published in The New England Journal of Medicine . Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies are severe disorders that begin in infancy or childhood and lead to uncontrolled epilepsy and intellectual disability.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
25.04.2018
Labelling alcoholic drinks as lower in strength could encourage people to drink more, study suggests
Labelling alcoholic drinks as lower in strength could encourage people to drink more, study suggests
Wines and beers labelled as lower in alcohol strength may increase the total amount of alcoholic drink consumed, according to a study published in the journal Health Psychology . The study was carried out by the Behaviour and Health Research Unit at the University of Cambridge in collaboration with the Centre for Addictive Behaviours Research at London South Bank University.
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