Medicine - Sep 20
Researchers at the University of Cambridge and the University of Oxford have discovered a new molecule that plays a key role in the immune response that is triggered by influenza infections. The molecule, a so-called mini viral RNA, is capable of inducing inflammation and cell death, and was produced at high levels by the 1918 pandemic influenza virus.
Life Sciences - Sep 20

Using some of the most advanced neuroimaging equipment in the world, researchers at Cardiff University's Brain Imaging Research Centre (CUBRIC) are set to study the brain function and structure of 17

Psychology - Sep 20
Psychology

Administrative affairs Arts and entertainment Buildings and grounds For UW employees Health and medicine Honors and awards Official notices Politics and government UW and the community - Every day, a

Physics - Sep 20
Physics

New findings published in ''Nature' on the formation of matter / Experiments provide information on the beginnings of the universe The building blocks of matter in our universe were formed in the first 10 microseconds of its existence, according to the currently accepted scientific picture.

Medicine - Sep 20

Twenty years after the University of Wisconsin-Madison's James Thomson derived the first human embryonic stem cell lines (ESC), his revolutionary discovery is just beginning to emerge on the clinical landscape.


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Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 17:03
Influenza virus molecules set immune response into overdrive
Researchers at the University of Cambridge and the University of Oxford have discovered a new molecule that plays a key role in the immune response that is triggered by influenza infections. The molecule, a so-called mini viral RNA, is capable of inducing inflammation and cell death, and was produced at high levels by the 1918 pandemic influenza virus.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 15:04
Most advanced brain imaging study in Wales
Using some of the most advanced neuroimaging equipment in the world, researchers at Cardiff University's Brain Imaging Research Centre (CUBRIC) are set to study the brain function and structure of 170 healthy volunteers as part of a research project to uncover the mysteries that still surround our most complex organ.

Physics / Materials Science - 12:03
New observations to understand the phase transition in quantum chromodynamics
New observations to understand the phase transition in quantum chromodynamics
New findings published in ''Nature' on the formation of matter / Experiments provide information on the beginnings of the universe The building blocks of matter in our universe were formed in the first 10 microseconds of its existence, according to the currently accepted scientific picture. After the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago, matter consisted mainly of quarks and gluons, two types of elementary particles whose interactions are governed by quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of strong interaction.

Psychology - 11:05
Even toddlers weigh risks, rewards when making choices
Even toddlers weigh risks, rewards when making choices
Administrative affairs Arts and entertainment Buildings and grounds For UW employees Health and medicine Honors and awards Official notices Politics and government UW and the community Every day, adults conduct cost-benefit analyses in some form for decisions large and small, economic and personal: Bring a lunch or go out? Buy or rent? Remain single or start a family? All are balances of risk and reward.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 09:05
Clinical prospects for stem cells begin to emerge
Twenty years after the University of Wisconsin-Madison's James Thomson derived the first human embryonic stem cell lines (ESC), his revolutionary discovery is just beginning to emerge on the clinical landscape. To date, a handful of clinical trials of ESC-derived therapies have been completed, with approximately 16 more now underway worldwide.

Environment - 09:00
Preserving Chile's water with solar-powered robots
Preserving Chile's water with solar-powered robots
EPFL researchers have developed floating, solar-powered robots to help protect Chile's water reservoirs. These low-cost robots can be assembled together in a variety of ways on the water surface to prevent the water from evaporating - thereby preserving a precious resource in this arid country and one that's crucial to its biggest industry: winemaking.

Computer Science / Telecom - Business / Economics - 20.09.2018
Reducing false positives in credit card fraud detection
Reducing false positives in credit card fraud detection
Model extracts granular behavioral patterns from transaction data to more accurately flag suspicious activity. Have you ever used your credit card at a new store or location only to have it declined? Has a sale ever been blocked because you charged a higher amount than usual? Consumers' credit cards are declined surprisingly often in legitimate transactions.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.09.2018
Anti-cancer drugs may hold key to overcoming antimalarial drug resistance
Anti-cancer drugs may hold key to overcoming antimalarial drug resistance
Scientists have found a way to boost the efficacy of the world's most powerful antimalarial drug with the help of chemotherapy medicines, according to new research published Communications. Scientists from the University of Melbourne and the Japanese pharmaceutical company Takeda have discovered that antimalarial drug artemisinin works through a "double whammy" attack on the deadly parasite.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.09.2018
Narcolepsy, scientists unmask the culprit of an enigmatic disease
Narcolepsy, scientists unmask the culprit of an enigmatic disease
Patients with a rare disease, called narcolepsy, suffer of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. A study published in the renowned scientific journal Nature reports the cause of the disease, which has previously been a mystery. The study is the result of a close collaboration between researchers from the University Sleep-Wake-Epilepsy-Centre Bern at the University Hospital (Inselspital), the Institute for Research in Biomedicine in Bellinzona and ETH Zurich.

Physics / Materials Science - 19.09.2018
What even Einstein didn't know
What even Einstein didn’t know
It provides the basis for solar energy and global communications: the photoelectric effect. Albert Einstein described it over a century ago. For the first time, scientists have now measured the absolute duration of the light absorption and of the resulting photoelectron which is released from a solid body.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics / Materials Science - 19.09.2018
Gaia hints at our Galaxy's turbulent life
Gaia hints at our Galaxy’s turbulent life
ESA ESA Science Gaia ESA's star mapping mission, Gaia, has shown our Milky Way galaxy is still enduring the effects of a near collision that set millions of stars moving like ripples on a pond. The close encounter likely took place sometime in the past 300-900 million years. It was discovered because of the pattern of movement it has given to stars in the Milky Way disc - one of the major components of our Galaxy.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 19.09.2018
Moderate warming, if sustained, could melt the ’sleeping giant’ of Antarctica
Imperial experts have predicted that sustained Antarctic warming of just 2°C could melt the largest ice sheet on earth. New research on Antarctic sediment layers has shown that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS), also known as Antarctica's ‘sleeping giant', retreated during extended warm periods in the past - when temperatures were like those predicted for this century.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.09.2018
Discovery could explain failed clinical trials for Alzheimer's
Researchers at King's College London have discovered a vicious feedback loop underlying brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease which may explain why so many drug trials have failed. The study also identifies a clinically approved drug which breaks the vicious cycle and protects against memory-loss in animal models of Alzheimer's.

Environment - 19.09.2018
Why do we love bees but hate wasps?
A lack of understanding of the important role of wasps in the ecosystem and economy is a fundamental reason why they are universally despised whereas bees are much loved, according to UCL-led research. Both bees and wasps are two of humanity's most ecologically and economically important organisms. They both pollinate our flowers and crops, but wasps also regulate populations of crop pests and insects that carry human diseases.

Physics / Materials Science - 19.09.2018
How Long does a Quantum Jump Take?
How Long does a Quantum Jump Take?
With the help of sophisticated experiments and calculations by the Vienna University of Technology, it has now become possible to measure the duration of the famous photoelectric effect. It was one of the crucial experiments in quantum physics: when light falls on certain materials, electrons are released from the surface.

History / Archeology - 19.09.2018
SE Asian population boom 4,000 years ago
SE Asian population boom 4,000 years ago
Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have uncovered a previously unconfirmed population boom across South East Asia that occurred 4,000 years ago, thanks to a new method for measuring prehistoric population growth. Using the new population measurement method, which utilises human skeletal remains, they have been able to prove a significant rapid increase in growth across populations in Thailand, China and Vietnam during the Neolithic Period, and a second subsequent rise in the Iron Age.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 19.09.2018
New insight into aging
Plasticity is enhanced but dysregulated in the aging brain They say you can't teach old dogs new tricks, but new research shows you can teach an old rat new sounds, even if the lesson doesn't stick very long. Researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) of McGill University examined the effects of aging on neuroplasticity in the primary auditory cortex, the part of the brain that processes auditory information.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 19.09.2018
Wild African monkeys are infected with the bacterium causing yaws in humans
By Katherine Gombay An international research team, led by scientists from McGill University, the German Primate Center, the Robert Koch Institute, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Masaryk University, the University of Tübingen and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, has successfully recovered genomes of the bacterium Treponema pallidum , which causes syphilis and yaws in humans, from wild nonhuman primate populations across sub-Saharan Africa.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 18.09.2018
’High-yield’ farming costs the environment less than previously thought - and could help spare habitats
New findings suggest that more intensive agriculture might be the "least bad" option for feeding the world while saving its species - provided use of such "land-efficient" systems prevents further conversion of wilderness to farmland. Agriculture that appears to be more eco-friendly but uses more land may actually have greater environmental costs per unit of food than "high-yield" farming that uses less land, a new study has found.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 18.09.2018
A thief in our midst: Scientists find gut proteins that rob us of vitamins
While most of us pay little attention to the food we eat after chewing and swallowing, the next step in digestion is only the beginning of an hours-long process of extracting the nutrients we need to live. Eating not only nourishes us, it nourishes a vast microbial community in our gut called the microbiota.
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