History - Aug 16
Since the earliest civilizations, people have recorded their thoughts and experiences through storytelling, art, philosophy and other forms of expression. Studying these works - collectively known as the humanities - helps us understand the past and ultimately ourselves. Today's humanities scholars are rediscovering the past through traditional ways, such as reexamining an ancient mummy case with a fresh perspective, as well as more modern techniques, which include the use of big data analysis or 3-D and X-ray models.
Chemistry - Aug 16

New wearable sensors developed by scientists at UC Berkeley can provide real-time measurements of sweat rate and electrolytes and metabolites in sweat. (Photo by Bizen Maskey, Sunchon National University) Needle pricks not your thing? A team of scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, is developing wearable skin sensors that can detect what's in your sweat.

Health - Aug 16
Health

New research led by academics at the University of Bristol Veterinary and Medical Schools used the 'One Health' approach to study three bacterial species in the noses of young cattle and found the carriage of the bacteria was surprisingly different.

Physics - Aug 16
Physics

Atomically thin materials developed by Stanford researchers could create heat-shields for cell phones or laptops that would protect people and temperature-sensitive components and make future electronic gadgets even more compact.

Life Sciences - Aug 16
Life Sciences

Plants can tell the time, and this affects their responses to certain herbicides used in agriculture according to new research led by the University of Bristol.


Category


Years
2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008


Results 1 - 20 of 1568.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 79 Next »


History / Archeology - 16.08.2019
Understanding ourselves and our past
Since the earliest civilizations, people have recorded their thoughts and experiences through storytelling, art, philosophy and other forms of expression. Studying these works - collectively known as the humanities - helps us understand the past and ultimately ourselves. Today's humanities scholars are rediscovering the past through traditional ways, such as reexamining an ancient mummy case with a fresh perspective, as well as more modern techniques, which include the use of big data analysis or 3-D and X-ray models.

Chemistry - 16.08.2019
Wearable sensors detect what’s in your sweat
New wearable sensors developed by scientists at UC Berkeley can provide real-time measurements of sweat rate and electrolytes and metabolites in sweat. (Photo by Bizen Maskey, Sunchon National University) Needle pricks not your thing? A team of scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, is developing wearable skin sensors that can detect what's in your sweat.

Physics - Electroengineering - 16.08.2019
Atomically thin heat shield protects electronics
Atomically thin heat shield protects electronics
Atomically thin materials developed by Stanford researchers could create heat-shields for cell phones or laptops that would protect people and temperature-sensitive components and make future electronic gadgets even more compact. Excess heat given off by smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices can be annoying, but beyond that it contributes to malfunctions and, in extreme cases, can even cause lithium batteries to explode.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.08.2019
New insight into bacterial infections found in the noses of healthy cattle
New insight into bacterial infections found in the noses of healthy cattle
New research led by academics at the University of Bristol Veterinary and Medical Schools used the 'One Health' approach to study three bacterial species in the noses of young cattle and found the carriage of the bacteria was surprisingly different. The findings which combined ideas and methods from both animal and human health research could help prevent and control respiratory diseases.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.08.2019
Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying?
Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying?
Plants can tell the time, and this affects their responses to certain herbicides used in agriculture according to new research led by the University of Bristol. The study, in collaboration with Syngenta, found that plant circadian rhythms regulate the sensitivity of plants to a widely used herbicide according to the time of day.

Life Sciences - Environment - 16.08.2019
Humans May Have Had Key Role in Cave Bear Extinction
Humans May Have Had Key Role in Cave Bear Extinction
Humans may have played a substantial role in the extinction of the European cave bear at the end of the last ice age. These findings of a study with the involvement of the University of Zurich suggest a drastic cave bear population decline starting around 40,000 years ago. Where in Europe did different populations of cave bears live and how they did they migrate during the Late Pleistocene? This is the topic that Verena Schünemann from the Institute of Evolutionary Medicine at the University of Zurich and a team of researchers investigated.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.08.2019
Relaxing of regulations for regenerative medicines has cascading effect internationally, new research warns
Countries that relax regulations for regenerative medicines could be causing a downward spiral in international standards, according to new research published today. Researchers warn that if just one country decides to relax regulations in the field, a heightened sense of competition can spur others to do the same.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 16.08.2019
Wireless sensors stick to skin and track health
Wireless sensors stick to skin and track health
Stanford engineers have developed experimental stickers that pick up physiological signals emanating from the skin, then wirelessly beam these health readings to a receiver clipped onto clothing. It's all part of a system called BodyNet. We tend to take our skin's protective function for granted, ignoring its other roles in signaling subtleties like a fluttering heart or a flush of embarrassment.

Life Sciences - 16.08.2019
Numbers count in the genetics of moles and melanomas
Numbers count in the genetics of moles and melanomas
University of Queensland scientists have identified a way to help dermatologists determine a patient's risk of developing melanoma. UQ Diamantina Institute researcher Associate Professor Rick Sturm said the team uncovered the specific gene variations affecting the number and types of moles on the body and their role in causing skin cancer.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 15.08.2019
Faulty gene leads to kidney disease
Faulty gene leads to kidney disease
New insights into why a faulty gene involved in a devastating form of a kidney condition called nephrotic syndrome leads to disease in some patients have been identified in new Kidney Research UK-funded research led by the University of Bristol. The findings, published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), could pave the way for new ways to prevent or treat the condition, by revealing new targets to intervene in the process.

Media - 15.08.2019
#MeToo Media Coverage Sympathetic to but Not Necessarily Empowering for Women
The #MeToo movement has encouraged women to share their personal stories of sexual harassment. While the movement amplifies previously unheard voices, a Carnegie Mellon University analysis of #MeToo media coverage shows accusers are often portrayed as sympathetic, but with less power and agency than their alleged perpetrators.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 15.08.2019
Ice sheets impact core elements of the Earth's carbon cycle
Ice sheets impact core elements of the Earth’s carbon cycle
The Earth's carbon cycle is crucial in controlling the greenhouse gas content of our atmosphere, and ultimately our climate. Ice sheets which cover about 10 percent of our Earth's land surface at present, were thought 20 years ago to be frozen wastelands, devoid of life and with supressed chemical weathering - irrelevant parts of the carbon cycle.

Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 15.08.2019
Dinosaur brains from baby to adult
Dinosaur brains from baby to adult
New research by a University of Bristol palaeontology post-graduate student has revealed fresh insights into how the braincase of the dinosaur Psittacosaurus developed and how this tells us about its posture. Psittacosaurus was a very common dinosaur in the Early Cretaceous period - 125 million years ago - that lived in eastern Asia, especially north-east China.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.08.2019
Dog detectives sniff out harmful bacteria causing lung infections
Dog detectives sniff out harmful bacteria causing lung infections
Sniffer dogs have been trained to detect ultra-low concentrations of bacteria which cause lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In a study by Imperial College London and the charity Medical Detection Dogs , researchers found that specially trained medical detection dogs were able to detect ultra-low concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), the most common cause of lung infection in people with CF.

Health - Environment - 15.08.2019
Heatwaves Increase Emergency Admissions to Swiss Hospitals
Heatwaves Increase Emergency Admissions to Swiss Hospitals
Numerous studies have shown that heat increases mortality rates. 1,2 In Switzerland, for example, the hot summer of 2015 caused around 800 additional deaths. 3 Only a few studies, however, have investigated the effects of heatwaves on morbidity and hospital admissions. Researchers from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) recently conducted a detailed analysis of emergency hospital admissions in Switzerland during the three heatwaves between June and August 2015 in a study commissioned by the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN).

Computer Science / Telecom - Microtechnics - 14.08.2019
A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots
A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots
Scientists at EPFL have developed a tiny pump that could play a big role in the development of autonomous soft robots, lightweight exoskeletons and smart clothing. Flexible, silent and weighing only one gram, it is poised to replace the rigid, noisy and bulky pumps currently used. The scientists' work has just been published in Nature.

Business / Economics - 14.08.2019
Offers insight into effects of housing eviction on people’s lives
Each year, more than 2 million U.S. households face the prospect of eviction, a disruptive event widely believed to trigger increased financial strain. A new study finds that by the time most tenants land in eviction court, they have already suffered years of intensifying financial distress.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.08.2019
Drug accelerates blood system’s recovery after chemotherapy, radiation
A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem cells after exposure to radiation. If the results can be replicated in humans, the compound could help people recover quicker from chemotherapy, radiation and bone marrow transplants. The study , published , also sheds light on the basic biology behind blood stem cell regeneration and the role of a specific molecular process that is blocked by the new drug.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.08.2019
Questions expected link between farming and evolution of immune system
Researchers have long theorized that cultural shifts thousands of years ago from hunting and gathering to agriculture and living in permanent settlements spurred an increase in diseases like smallpox and measles. Compared to hunter-gatherers, farmers stayed put, living close to one another and their animals.

Environment - 14.08.2019
New insight into glaciers regulating global silicon cycling
New insight into glaciers regulating global silicon cycling
A new review of silicon cycling in glacial environments, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, highlights the potential importance of glaciers in exporting silicon to downstream ecosystems. This, say the researchers, could have implications for marine primary productivity and impact the carbon cycle on the timescales of ice ages.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 79 Next »

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |