Environment - Oct 21
A rare element discovered in Great Barrier Reef coral skeletons will help scientists understand the environmental history of nearby regions. Researchers at The University of Queensland's Sustainable Minerals Institute (SMI) and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (SEES) found concentrations of the element vanadium in coral is directly linked to forest burning and land clearing in the area.
Astronomy - Oct 18
Astronomy

The European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter, which carries instruments proposed, designed and built at UCL, is completing final testing in Germany before travelling to Cape Canaveral, USA, for launch in February 2020.

Health - Oct 18

Creatine, the organic acid that is popularly taken as a supplement by athletes and bodybuilders, serves as a molecular battery for immune cells by storing and distributing energy to power their fight against cancer, according to new UCLA research.

Innovation - Oct 18

Crowd density estimation provides organisers with valuable information. Festivals and other large-scale events attract many people, but organisers often lack insight into the number of people attending the event and their movements.

Life Sciences - Oct 18

Scientists at the Morgridge Institute for Research have isolated a natural chemical that acts as a potent kryptonite against schistosomes, the parasitic worms that burrow through human skin and cause devastating health problems.


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Environment - Earth Sciences - 21.10.2019
Coral discovery equips researchers with new environmental monitoring method
A rare element discovered in Great Barrier Reef coral skeletons will help scientists understand the environmental history of nearby regions. Researchers at The University of Queensland's Sustainable Minerals Institute (SMI) and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (SEES) found concentrations of the element vanadium in coral is directly linked to forest burning and land clearing in the area.

Astronomy / Space Science - 18.10.2019
Sun explorer spacecraft leaves for launch site
Sun explorer spacecraft leaves for launch site
The European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter, which carries instruments proposed, designed and built at UCL, is completing final testing in Germany before travelling to Cape Canaveral, USA, for launch in February 2020. Solar Orbiter will perform unprecedented close-up observations of the Sun, to help answer questions about why the Sun's corona is so hot and why the solar wind flows away from the Sun so rapidly, typically at 400-500 kilometres per second.

Innovation / Technology - 18.10.2019
UAntwerp scientists and imec use wireless technology at festivals
Crowd density estimation provides organisers with valuable information. Festivals and other large-scale events attract many people, but organisers often lack insight into the number of people attending the event and their movements.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.10.2019
Creatine powers’T cells’ fight against cancer
Creatine, the organic acid that is popularly taken as a supplement by athletes and bodybuilders, serves as a molecular battery for immune cells by storing and distributing energy to power their fight against cancer, according to new UCLA research. The study , conducted in mice and published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, is the first to show that creatine uptake is critical to the anti-tumor activities of CD8 T cells, also known as killer T cells, the foot soldiers of the immune system.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.10.2019
Researchers may have found a new way to fight skin-burrowing schistosomiasis parasite
Scientists at the Morgridge Institute for Research have isolated a natural chemical that acts as a potent kryptonite against schistosomes, the parasitic worms that burrow through human skin and cause devastating health problems. A research team led by Morgridge investigator Phillip Newmark reported in the Oct.

Earth Sciences - 18.10.2019
Better Predicting Earthquake Damage to Infrastructure with Faster Computing
Better Predicting Earthquake Damage to Infrastructure with Faster Computing
A Q&A with a Berkeley Lab scientist on how exascale computing could dramatically accelerate research and earthquake safety By Jessica Scully Researchers at Berkeley Lab are using high-performance computing systems to better predict how structures will respond to an earthquake along one of the Bay Area's most dangerous faults.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.10.2019
Krill’s role in global climate should inform fishing policy in Antarctica
Krill ' small crustaceans eaten by whales, seals and penguins ' play a vital role in removing carbon from the atmosphere, according to a new study. A study on how krill affect the Southern Ocean's ability to take in carbon from the atmosphere and bury it on the seafloor has revealed the small crustaceans play an outsized role in the process.

Health - 18.10.2019
Increase health benefits of exercise by working out before breakfast - new research
Exercising before eating breakfast burns more fat, improves how the body responds to insulin and lowers people's risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. According to a new study, published Friday 18 October 2019 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, health scientists at the Universities of Bath and Birmingham found that by changing the timing of when you eat and exercise, people can better control their blood sugar levels.

Career - 18.10.2019
Promoting open science
Promoting open science
As part of its 50th anniversary celebration, EPFL is highlighting his commitment for open and reproducible research through an exceptional Open Science Day, today. Interview of president of the Open Science Strategic Committee, Katrin Beyer. When the World Wide Web was invented at CERN 30 years ago, no one talked about open science.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 18.10.2019
New clinical research offers possibility of future rehabilitation for patients in vegetative and minimally conscious states
Non-invasive brain stimulation is to be trialed for the first time alongside advanced brain imaging techniques in patients who are minimally conscious or in a vegetative state. The study builds on promising results from the Centre for Human Brain Health at the University of Birmingham which suggested that non-invasive brain stimulation can improve the success of rehabilitation for non-responsive patients.

Agronomy / Food Science - 18.10.2019
Top ways travellers try to beat jetlag
A study of passengers travelling on long haul Qantas flights provides an insight into the ways travellers are trying to minimise feelings of jetlag. The research is part of ongoing studies the airline is conducting with the University of Sydney's Charles Perkins Centre to identify evidence-based methods to reduce fatigue.

Life Sciences - 18.10.2019
Region, age, and sex decide who gets arthritis-linked 'fabella' knee bone
Region, age, and sex decide who gets arthritis-linked ’fabella’ knee bone
The once-rare 'fabella' bone has made a dramatic resurgence in human knees, but who's likely to have a fabella or two - and why? Fabellae aren't formed by knee-jerk reactions to either genetics or environment alone. Dr Michael Berthaume Department of Bioengineering Led by Dr Michael Berthaume at Imperial College London, a new meta-analysis has found that the mystery knee bone is more common in older people, more often found in men than women, and in people in Asia.

Chemistry - Environment - 17.10.2019
New catalyst helps turn carbon dioxide into fuel
New catalyst helps turn carbon dioxide into fuel
A new process shows promise in turning the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide back into usable fuels, and yields four times as much fuel as previous approaches. Imagine grabbing carbon dioxide from car exhaust pipes and other sources and turning this main greenhouse gas into fuels like natural gas or propane: a sustainability dream come true.

Environment - Palaeontology - 17.10.2019
How ocean ecosystems recovered after mass extinction event 66 million years ago
How ocean ecosystems recovered after mass extinction event 66 million years ago
An international team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have produced an unprecedented record of the biotic recovery of ocean ecosystems that followed after the last mass extinction, 66 million years ago. In an article published in the journal Nature , the team, which includes researchers from Southampton, University College London, Frankfurt and California, present a 13 million-year record of fossil plankton dynamics in the aftermath of near annihilation, providing a remarkable glimpse into how the marine ecosystem ‘reboots'.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 17.10.2019
Ancient stars shed light on Earth’s similarities to other planets
Earth-like planets may be common in the universe, a new UCLA study implies. The team of astrophysicists and geochemists presents new evidence that the Earth is not unique. The study was published on Oct. 18. “We have just raised the probability that many rocky planets are like the Earth, and there's a very large number of rocky planets in the universe,” said co-author Edward Young, UCLA professor of geochemistry and cosmochemistry.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.10.2019
Stress test separates tough bacteria from the tender
By scooping the guts out of bacteria and refilling them with an expansive fluid, scientists can discover whether a microbe is structurally strong or weak, gaining insights that could help fight infectious diseases or aid studies of the beneficial bacterial communities known as microbiomes. Bacteria. Sometimes we can't live with 'em, but there's a growing appreciation that we can't live without 'em.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.10.2019
Inventive Design Illuminates Neurons Deep in the Brain
New paper features a range of research from engineering design to nanofabrication and neurobiology experiments on live neurons An interdisciplinary collaboration between researchers at Carnegie Mellon University has produced a new type of neural probe with an innovative design, improving the way researchers study neurons deep in the brain.

Pedagogy - 17.10.2019
Millions more children in West and Central Africa suffering from malnutrition, according to study
The number of malnourished children in West and Central Africa rose by three million in the space of five years, a study shows. Academics from Cardiff University say the research, the first of its kind in the region, also shows no reduction in the number of children experiencing multiple forms of malnutrition and that this multiple burden is much more prevalent than previously thought.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 17.10.2019
How roots grow hair
How roots grow hair
The roots of plants can do a lot of things: They grow in length to reach water, they can bend to circumvent stones, and they form fine root hairs enabling them to absorb more nutrients from the soil. A team of researchers led by scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now identified an important regulator of this process.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.10.2019
Biodiversity Improves Crop Production
Biodiversity Improves Crop Production
10/17/2019 Around 20 percent of the world's agricultural areas yields less than it did 20 years ago. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization FAO, humans are the culprit: we have not done enough to protect biodiversity. In many respects, nature is an outstanding service provider for agriculture.
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