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Environment - Apr 9
Environment
Researchers at the University of Oxford, alongside international collaborators, have found that there is a significant knowledge gap in the risks posed by climate change to mammals. In their systematic review, published in the Journal of Animal Ecology, the scientists identify that there are significant blanks about the risks to mammals in regions most vulnerable to climate change, including boreal and tropic areas.
Social Sciences - Apr 9

A study by University of Queensland researchers has highlighted the need to improve mental health assessments and pathways to care for childbearing women who experience suicidality. Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research (QCMHR) researcher Dr Carla Meurk said suicide was the leading cause of maternal death in Australia, which highlighted the importance of timely and adequate mental health care during pregnancy and postpartum.

Environment - Apr 9
Environment

A new study shows that several disagreements between Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt around Africa's largest hydropower plant, the new Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), could be alleviated by massively expanding solar and wind power across the region.

Environment - Apr 9

Solar and wind power could mitigate geopolitical conflict in Northeast Africa. Friday, April 9, 2021 — A new study shows that several disagreements between Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt around Africa's largest hydropower plant, the new Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), could be alleviated by massively expanding solar and wind power across the region.

Pharmacology - Apr 9
Pharmacology

Cognitive motor training helps in the fight against Alzheimer's and dementia, as demonstrated for the first time in a study by an international team of researchers with ETH Zurich involvement.


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Environment - Life Sciences - 09.04.2021
We don't know how most mammals will respond to climate change
We don’t know how most mammals will respond to climate change
Researchers at the University of Oxford, alongside international collaborators, have found that there is a significant knowledge gap in the risks posed by climate change to mammals. In their systematic review, published in the Journal of Animal Ecology, the scientists identify that there are significant blanks about the risks to mammals in regions most vulnerable to climate change, including boreal and tropic areas.

Social Sciences - Health - 09.04.2021
Suicidality among childbearing women a major challenge
A study by University of Queensland researchers has highlighted the need to improve mental health assessments and pathways to care for childbearing women who experience suicidality. Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research (QCMHR) researcher Dr Carla Meurk said suicide was the leading cause of maternal death in Australia, which highlighted the importance of timely and adequate mental health care during pregnancy and postpartum.

Environment - Politics - 09.04.2021
Research from Vrije Universiteit Brussel and KU Leuven on Ethiopian mega-dam
Solar and wind power could mitigate geopolitical conflict in Northeast Africa Friday, April 9, 2021 — A new study shows that several disagreements between Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt around Africa's largest hydropower plant, the new Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), could be alleviated by massively expanding solar and wind power across the region.

Environment - Politics - 09.04.2021
Solar and wind power could mitigate conflict in northeast Africa
Solar and wind power could mitigate conflict in northeast Africa
A new study shows that several disagreements between Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt around Africa's largest hydropower plant, the new Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), could be alleviated by massively expanding solar and wind power across the region. Adapting GERD operation to support grid integration of solar and wind power would provide tangible energy and water benefits to all involved countries, creating regional win-win situations.

Pharmacology - Health - 09.04.2021
Fighting dementia with play
Fighting dementia with play
Cognitive motor training helps in the fight against Alzheimer's and dementia, as demonstrated for the first time in a study by an international team of researchers with ETH Zurich involvement. The training platform used was developed by an ETH Zurich spin-off. A dementia diagnosis turns the world upside down, not only for the person affected but also for their relatives, as brain function gradually declines.

Chemistry - Physics - 09.04.2021
X-Ray Study Recasts Role of Battery Material from Cathode to Catalyst
Newly clarified reactions point to novel applications for a long-studied lithium-rich battery material Wanli Yang, a senior scientist at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source, working on a resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) system. Yang adapted the RIXS technique for a recent Joule study on lithium-rich battery materials.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.04.2021
Optically Active Defects Improve Carbon Nanotubes
Optically Active Defects Improve Carbon Nanotubes
The properties of carbon-based nanomaterials can be altered and engineered through the deliberate introduction of certain structural "imperfections" or defects. The challenge, however, is to control the number and type of these defects. In the case of carbon nanotubes - microscopically small tubular compounds that emit light in the near-infrared - chemists and materials scientists at Heidelberg University led by Jana Zaumseil have now demonstrated a new reaction pathway to enable such defect control.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.04.2021
Urolithin A shows effective against muscular dystrophy
Urolithin A shows effective against muscular dystrophy
A new study published in Science Translational Medicine by EPFL professor Johan Auwerx and scientists from EPFL start-up Amazentis highlights the effectiveness of mitophagy-stimulating molecule Urolithin A in mice to cure a disease similar to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. And points to a possible treatment for affected people.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 08.04.2021
Particle’s ’wobble’ hints at new physics
The "wobble", or rate of precession, of the muon particle in a magnetic field is different from what our best theoretical model of the subatomic world would predict, according to an experiment involving UCL researchers that strengthens evidence for new, unknown physics. The Muon g-2 experiment, carried out at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the United States, measured with unprecedented precision the rate at which the muon "wobbled" (precessed) as it circulated a 15-metre magnetic ring at nearly the speed of light.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.04.2021
Illuminating a sea turtle mystery
Illuminating a sea turtle mystery
North Pacific loggerhead turtles' years-long oceanic journeys remain poorly understood. Using data from satellite tracking and other techniques, scientists reveal a unique phenomenon that may explain the endangered migrants' pathway. By Rob Jordan Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment "Not all those who wander are lost...

Health - Pharmacology - 08.04.2021
Veal calf fattening: it can work with less antibiotics
By adopting a few simple measures, farmers can drastically reduce the use of antibiotics and improve the well-being of their animals without economic disadvantages. This was confirmed in a field trial- the first of its kind in Switzerland - carried out by researchers of the University of Bern based on the specially developed "outdoor veal calf" method.

Physics - Materials Science - 08.04.2021
The Spintronics Technology Revolution Could Be Just a Hopfion Away
Pioneering study co-led by Berkeley Lab has significance for next-gen information technologies Artist's drawing of characteristic 3D spin texture of a magnetic hopfion. Berkeley Lab scientists have created and observed 3D hopfions. The discovery could advance spintronics memory devices.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 08.04.2021
Modern Human Brain Originated in Africa Around 1.7 Million Years Ago
Modern Human Brain Originated in Africa Around 1.7 Million Years Ago
The human brain as we know it today is relatively young. It evolved about 1.7 million years ago when the culture of stone tools in Africa became increasingly complex. A short time later, the new Homo populations spread to Southeast Asia, researchers from the University of Zurich have now shown using computed tomography analyses of fossilized skulls.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 08.04.2021
More than 5,000 tons of extraterrestrial dust fall to Earth each year
More than 5,000 tons of extraterrestrial dust fall to Earth each year
Every year, our planet encounters dust from comets 1 and asteroid 2 . These interplanetary dust particles pass through our atmosphere and give rise to shooting stars. Some of them reach the ground in the form of micrometeorites. An international program 3 conducted for nearly 20 years by scientists from the CNRS, the Université Paris-Saclay and the National museum of natural history 4 with the support of the French polar institute, has determined that 5,200 tons per year of these micrometeorites reach the ground.

Earth Sciences - Social Sciences - 08.04.2021
Hidden meaning of mountain gorillas' chest beats
Hidden meaning of mountain gorillas’ chest beats
The image of a gorilla beating its chest is one of the most iconic images related to the behaviour of these primates. However, despite being one of the most emblematic sounds in the animal kingdom, the well-known chest beats have received little attention from the scientific community. A research team in which Jordi Galbany, expert from the Faculty of Psychology of the UB, takes part, has found a correlation between the body size of gorillas and the sound frequency of the typical chest beats.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.04.2021
Leaking calcium in neurons an early sign of Alzheimer’s pathology
Alzheimer's disease is known for its slow attack on neurons crucial to memory and cognition.  But why are these particular neurons in aging brains so susceptible to the disease's ravages, while others remain resilient? In a new study published April 8 in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia, The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association , researchers at the Yale School of Medicine found that susceptible neurons in the prefrontal cortex develop a "leak" in calcium storage with advancing age.

Physics - 07.04.2021
Hint for new particles
Hint for new particles
The US research laboratory "Fermilab" has published the eagerly awaited results of the experimental measurement of the so-called anomalous magnetic dipole moment of the muon. As members of the "Muon g-2 Theory Initiative", researchers from the University of Bern have calculated the same physical quantity theoretically in parallel, based on the Standard Model.

Agronomy / Food Science - 07.04.2021
Losing weight through exercise
Losing weight through exercise
Why physical activity entices you to eat more - and how to fight it Around two thirds of men and half of women in Germany* are overweight, according to statistics collected by the German Obesity Society. Concurrently millions of people want to lose weight. One way to do this is exercising. But what influence does sport have on (direct) eating habits? Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of Nebraska (USA) have now investigated this question for the first time.

Health - Psychology - 07.04.2021
Link between COVID-19 infection and subsequent mental health and neurological conditions found
One in three COVID-19 survivors received a neurological or psychiatric diagnosis within six months of infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, an observational study of more than 230,000 patient health records published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal estimates. The study looked at 14 neurological and mental health disorders.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 07.04.2021
Dark Energy Survey physicists open new window into dark energy
For the first time, DES scientists can combine measurements of the distribution of matter, galaxies, and galaxy clusters to advance our understanding of dark energy. The universe is expanding at an ever-increasing rate, and while no one is sure why, researchers with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) at least had a strategy for figuring it out: They would combine measurements of the distribution of matter, galaxies and galaxy clusters to better understand what's going on.
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