news

Health - Feb 26
Extensive use of mobile phone is linked to increased headaches and poor sleep, says an Imperial expert. Professor Paul Elliott, Chair in Epidemiology and Public Health Medicine at Imperial College London, is leading two studies to investigate whether there is a link between the use of mobile phones and long-term health problems in adults and adolescents.
Health - Feb 26

People's fear of radiation is sometimes out of proportion to the risks it poses, said an Imperial expert at a public healthcare event. Professor Gerry Thomas, Chair in Molecular Pathology at Imperial College London and the Chernobyl Tissue bank, has led research looking at the health impacts of radiation.

Physics - Feb 26
Physics

EPFL scientists have developed a new type of microscope slide that can boost the amount of light in fluorescence microscopy by a factor of up to 25.

Life Sciences - Feb 26

Rare genetic disorders caused by small changes in a person's genetic make-up affect fewer than 1 in 2,000 people globally - but they are a major cause of developmental and psychiatric conditions, such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability.

Health - Feb 26

Maiko Bristow, a firefighter and EMT with the San Francisco Fire Department, is part of a long-term investigation into female firefighter's risk of breast cancer.


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Health - Social Sciences - 13:38
Mobile phone use triggers frequent headaches and lack of sleep
Extensive use of mobile phone is linked to increased headaches and poor sleep, says an Imperial expert. Professor Paul Elliott, Chair in Epidemiology and Public Health Medicine at Imperial College London, is leading two studies to investigate whether there is a link between the use of mobile phones and long-term health problems in adults and adolescents.

Health - 13:38
We should have less fear of radiation, says Imperial researcher
People's fear of radiation is sometimes out of proportion to the risks it poses, said an Imperial expert at a public healthcare event. Professor Gerry Thomas, Chair in Molecular Pathology at Imperial College London and the Chernobyl Tissue bank, has led research looking at the health impacts of radiation.

Life Sciences - Health - 11:35
Global group to investigate links between rare genomic disorders and psychiatric conditions
Rare genetic disorders caused by small changes in a person's genetic make-up affect fewer than 1 in 2,000 people globally - but they are a major cause of developmental and psychiatric conditions, such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability.

Physics - Health - 11:01
Glass slides that stand to revolutionize fluorescence microscopy
Glass slides that stand to revolutionize fluorescence microscopy
EPFL scientists have developed a new type of microscope slide that can boost the amount of light in fluorescence microscopy by a factor of up to 25. These new slides can both amplify and direct light, making them ideal for applications ranging from early-stage diagnosis to the rapid archiving of pathology samples.

Health - Environment - 09:07
Women firefighters face high exposure to toxic ’forever chemicals’
Maiko Bristow, a firefighter and EMT with the San Francisco Fire Department, is part of a long-term investigation into female firefighter's risk of breast cancer. (UC Berkeley photo by Brittany Hosea-Small) San Francisco's women firefighters are exposed to higher levels of certain toxic PFAS chemicals than women working in downtown San Francisco offices, shows a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of California, San Francisco, and Silent Spring Institute.

Health - Chemistry - 08:01
Better care: fast, sensitive blood tests for use at home
Better care: fast, sensitive blood tests for use at home
They should be fast, portable and easy to use: blood tests that can be done at home. Having already come up with a prototype, ETH Pioneer Fellow Alexander Tanno is working with doctoral student Yves Blickenstorfer to bring the idea to market. The prototype that Alexander Tanno is holding between his thumb and forefinger doesn't look particularly impressive.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 08:00
Stone tools reveal humans survived a volcanic super-eruption
Stone tools reveal humans survived a volcanic super-eruption
The recent discovery of stone tools in India has revealed that humans survived and coped with one of the largest volcanic events in human history. The intensity and impact of the historic Toba super-eruption in Indonesia sparked a long-running debate among researchers involving climatic, geological, archaeological and genetic evidence, until now.

Life Sciences - 26.02.2020
Deaf moths evolved noise-cancelling scales to evade prey
Deaf moths evolved noise-cancelling scales to evade prey
Some species of deaf moths can absorb as much as 85 per cent of the incoming sound energy from predatory bats - who use echolocation to detect them. The findings, published in Royal Society Interface today [26 February], reveal the moths, who are unable to hear the ultrasonic calls of bats, have evolved this clever defensive strategy to help it survive.

Social Sciences - Pharmacology - 25.02.2020
Computer-based treatment for adolescent anxiety shows promising results
For adolescents diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, a simple computer-based program known as attention training may offer relief, according to a new Yale-led study. In a promising finding, researchers discovered major reductions in anxiety among 64 youths after just four twice-weekly sessions of the attention training program.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 25.02.2020
400 Marsquakes detected by UK sensors in one year
400 Marsquakes detected by UK sensors in one year
The NASA InSight lander, which is supported by the UK Space Agency, has recorded 400 likely 'Marsquakes' in the first year of its mission. The seismic vibrations on Mars were detected by a set of silicon sensors developed in the UK for InSight's Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure (SEIS). Imperial College London, Oxford University, University of Bristol and STFC RAL Space worked in partnership, with £4 million in funding from the UK Space Agency, to develop three sensors which are sensitive enough to detect motion at sub-atomic scales.

Astronomy / Space Science - 25.02.2020
A Year of Surprising Science From NASA’s InSight Mars Mission
A new comprehension of Mars is emerging based on the first year of NASA's InSight mission.  Results described in a set of six papers published today, five and one in Nature Communications , reveal a living planet that is the scene of earthquakes, dust devils and strange magnetic impulses.

Environment - Chemistry - 25.02.2020
Instrument may enable mail-in testing to detect heavy metals in water
Instrument may enable mail-in testing to detect heavy metals in water
Whisk-shaped device absorbs trace contaminants, preserves them in dry state that can be shipped to labs for analysis. Lead, arsenic, and other heavy metals are increasingly present in water systems around the world due to human activities, such as pesticide use and, more recently, the inadequate disposal of electronic waste.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 25.02.2020
Fur-friendly 'wearable for pets' developed at Imperial
Fur-friendly ’wearable for pets’ developed at Imperial
Imperial College researchers London have invented a new health tracking sensor for pets and people that monitors vital signs through fur or clothing Our stretchy, flexible invention heralds a whole new type of sensor that can track the health of animals and humans alike over fur or clothing. Dr Firat Guder Department of Bioengineering The new type of sensor, which can detect vital signs like heart and breathing rates through fur and up to four layers of clothing, could help make everyday wearables for pets and livestock a reality.

Pharmacology - Health - 25.02.2020
Engaging with schizophrenia - experts argue for new approaches to treatment
A better understanding of the lived experience of people with schizophrenia would enable clinicians to help patients live with their condition, alongside treating symptoms with medication and psychotherapy, say experts at the University of Birmingham. According to researchers at the University, this approach would involve developing an understanding of ‘self-disturbance' in schizophrenia - in which patients' sense of connection to themselves and to their actions is disrupted.

Media - Social Sciences - 25.02.2020
Analysis: How do those bereaved by suicide respond to media reports?
Guidelines on reporting suicide are aimed at preventing further suicides and minimising distress to the bereaved. Here Dr Alexandra Pitman (UCL Psychiatry) writes about her research looking at how relatives of suicide victims respond to news, and speaks to others in the field. You are a junior reporter on a busy local newspaper.

Environment - 25.02.2020
Investments by the super-rich drive deforestation
Wealthy individuals are increasingly investing in agriculture. Their investments boost production of plant-based raw materials for human consumption, industrial uses, and animal fodder. The resulting capital flows directly contribute to deforestation in the global South, especially in the tropics. That is the conclusion of a new study by the University of Bern's Centre for Development and Environment (CDE).

Social Sciences - 25.02.2020
Life expectancy not improving for first time in 100 years
For the first time in more than 100 years life expectancy has failed to increase across the country, and for the poorest 10% of women it has actually declined, according to a new report from Sir Michael Marmot and the UCL Institute of Health Equity. 10 years on since Sir Marmot first published the Marmot Review, the new report confirms that over the last decade health inequalities have widened overall, and the amount of time people spend in poor health has increased since 2010.

Physics - Materials Science - 25.02.2020
A better way to build diamonds
A better way to build diamonds
With the right amount of pressure and surprisingly little heat, a substance found in fossil fuels can transform into pure diamond. It sounds like alchemy: take a clump of white dust, squeeze it in a diamond-studded pressure chamber, then blast it with a laser. Open the chamber and find a new microscopic speck of pure diamond inside.

Environment - 24.02.2020
Climate change threatens research itself
Australian experts are calling for the higher education sector to prepare for the knock-on effects of climate change on their research. A collaborative study between The University of Queensland and RMIT found extreme climate change weather events such as bushfires, hailstorms and floods impacted on research production.

Environment - Life Sciences - 24.02.2020
Shows how glacier algae creates dark zone at the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet
Shows how glacier algae creates dark zone at the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet
New research led by scientists from the University of Bristol has revealed new insights into how the microscopic algae that thrives along the edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet causes widespread darkening. This darkening is critically important as darker ice absorbs more sunlight energy and melts faster, accelerating the overall melting of the ice, which is the single largest contributor to global sea level rises.
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