Astronomy & Space

One of the most powerful eruptions from a black hole ever recorded has been discovered by an international team of astronomers. The mega-explosion, which took place billions of years ago, may help explain the formation of a pattern of star clusters resembling beads on a string, according to the study.

Computer Science

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, the University Hospital Bonn and the University of Bonn have created an open-source platform known as A-SOiD that can learn and predict user-defined behaviors, just from video. The results of the study have now been published in the journal "Nature Methods".

Health - Feb 21

Shining a specific frequency of red light on a person's back for 15 minutes can reduce blood sugar levels, according to a new study from City, University of London and UCL.

Life Sciences - Feb 21
Life Sciences

Microbiologist Bodo Philipp on the adaptability of micro-organisms and the benefits and risks for humans.

Health - Feb 21

Student enrollment in districts that provided in-person schooling in fall 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic showed a greater decline among nonwhite students than white students.

Life Sciences - Feb 21
Life Sciences

Prostheses that connect to the nervous system have been available for several years. Now, researchers at ETH Zurich have found evidence that neuroprosthetics work better when they use signals that are inspired by nature.

Health - Feb 21

An enthusiastic response to food in early childhood may be linked to a higher likelihood of experiencing eating disorder symptoms in adolescence, according to a new study led by researchers at UCL and Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Electroengineering

Researchers from Fujitsu and QuTech have developed new and ultra-cold electronic circuits to control diamond-based quantum bits.

Earth Sciences

Research team analyses organic material from the early Earth tracing its origin and composition.

Babies who are breastfed, or partially breastfed, for more than six months are less likely to be given sugar-sweetened drinks and sweet or salty snacks before they are 12 months-old, according to new research Babies who are b

Mathematics - Feb 21

An easy-to-use technique could assist everyone from economists to sports analysts.

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Astronomy / Space - 21.02.2024
Black hole fashions stellar beads on a string
Black hole fashions stellar beads on a string
One of the most powerful eruptions from a black hole ever recorded has been discovered by an international team of astronomers. The mega-explosion, which took place billions of years ago, may help explain the formation of a pattern of star clusters resembling beads on a string, according to the study.

Computer Science - Health - 21.02.2024
Artificial intelligence recognizes patterns in behaviour
Artificial intelligence recognizes patterns in behaviour
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, the University Hospital Bonn and the University of Bonn have created an open-source platform known as A-SOiD that can learn and predict user-defined behaviors, just from video. The results of the study have now been published in the journal "Nature Methods".

Health - Psychology - 21.02.2024
Avid appetite in childhood linked to later eating disorder symptoms
An enthusiastic response to food in early childhood may be linked to a higher likelihood of experiencing eating disorder symptoms in adolescence, according to a new study led by researchers at UCL and Erasmus University Rotterdam. The study, published in  The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health , looked at survey data from 3,670 young people in the UK and the Netherlands to investigate how appetite traits in early childhood might relate to the likelihood of developing eating disorder symptoms up to 10 years later.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.02.2024
Red light can reduce blood glucose levels
Shining a specific frequency of red light on a person's back for 15 minutes can reduce blood sugar levels, according to a new study from City, University of London and UCL. The researchers found that 670 nm red light stimulated energy production within mitochondria, the tiny powerhouses within cells, leading to increased consumption of glucose.

Electroengineering - Physics - 21.02.2024
Freezing electronics to control diamond spin qubits
Freezing electronics to control diamond spin qubits
Researchers from Fujitsu and QuTech have developed new and ultra-cold electronic circuits to control diamond-based quantum bits. As a result of their joint research project, it becomes possible to build larger quantum computers, through overcoming the 'wiring bottleneck', while maintaining high quality performance.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.02.2024
'Ways of decomposing chemicals may be developed in just a few decades' time'
’Ways of decomposing chemicals may be developed in just a few decades’ time’
Microbiologist Bodo Philipp on the adaptability of micro-organisms and the benefits and risks for humans A team headed by Prof. Bodo Philipp and Dr. Johannes Holert from the Institute of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology has found bacteria in Münster's wastewater which can completely decompose a substance called "TRIS" (tris hydroxymethyl aminomethane), and the researchers were able to throw light on the metabolic pathway.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 21.02.2024
High resolution techniques reveal clues in 3.5 billion-year-old biomass
High resolution techniques reveal clues in 3.5 billion-year-old biomass
Research team analyses organic material from the early Earth tracing its origin and composition To learn about the first organisms on our planet, researchers have to analyse the rocks of the early Earth. These can only be found in a few places on the surface of the Earth. The Pilbara Craton in Western Australia is one of these rare sites: there are rocks there that are around 3.5 billion years old containing traces of the microorganisms that lived at that time.

Health - Pedagogy - 21.02.2024
School enrollment during COVID-19: U-M study reveals racial disparities
Student enrollment in districts that provided in-person schooling in fall 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic showed a greater decline among nonwhite students than white students. But in districts that offered virtual learning, the opposite was true, according to a University of Michigan study. The results , published in the journal PNAS, are consistent with the fact that communities of color faced greater risks from COVID-19 and reported less trust in medical and social institutions.

Agronomy / Food Science - 21.02.2024
Breastfed babies less likely to be given treats and sweetened drinks before 12 months
Babies who are breastfed, or partially breastfed, for more than six months are less likely to be given sugar-sweetened drinks and sweet or salty snacks before they are 12 months-old, according to new research Babies who are breastfed, or partially breastfed, for more than six months are less likely to be given sugar-sweetened drinks and sweet or salty snacks before they are 12 months-old, according to new research.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.02.2024
Bio-inspired neuroprosthetics: sending signals the brain can understand
Bio-inspired neuroprosthetics: sending signals the brain can understand
Prostheses that connect to the nervous system have been available for several years. Now, researchers at ETH Zurich have found evidence that neuroprosthetics work better when they use signals that are inspired by nature. A few years ago, a team of researchers working under Professor Stanisa Raspopovic at the ETH Zurich Neuroengineering Lab gained worldwide attention when they announced that their prosthetic legs had enabled amputees to feel sensations from this artificial body part for the first time.

Mathematics - Computer Science - 21.02.2024
Automated method helps researchers quantify uncertainty in their predictions
An easy-to-use technique could assist everyone from economists to sports analysts. Pollsters trying to predict presidential election results and physicists searching for distant exoplanets have at least one thing in common: They often use a tried-and-true scientific technique called Bayesian inference.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.02.2024
Researchers are using RNA in a new approach to fight HIV
Society learned about the value of mRNA during the COVID-19 pandemic when we saw scientists and medical professionals harness its power to deliver a vaccine for the virus within a year. Now, University of Waterloo pharmacy associate professor Emmanuel Ho has developed a novel nanomedicine loaded with genetic material called small interfering RNAs (siRNA) to fight human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using gene therapy.

Health - Physics - 20.02.2024
Terahertz biosensor detects skin cancer with remarkable accuracy
Researchers have developed a revolutionary biosensor using terahertz (THz) waves that can detect skin cancer with exceptional sensitivity, potentially paving the way for earlier and easier diagnoses. Researchers have developed a revolutionary biosensor using terahertz (THz) waves that can detect skin cancer with exceptional sensitivity, potentially paving the way for earlier and easier diagnoses.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.02.2024
Small ribonucleic acid with a big impact
Small ribonucleic acid with a big impact
Klebsiella pneumoniae is one of the most common and most dangerous bacterial pathogens impacting humans, causing infections of the gastrointestinal tract, pneumonia, wound infections and even blood poisoning. With the aim of discovering therapeutically exploitable weaknesses in Klebsiella, a research team from the Balance of the Microverse Cluster of Excellence at the University of Jena has taken a close look at the molecular biology of the bacteria and was able to uncover the importance of a small, non-coding ribonucleic acid (sRNA for short) for the gene regulation of K. pneumoniae.

Psychology - 20.02.2024
Mental health impaired internationally following the outbreak of war in Ukraine
Mental health impaired internationally following the outbreak of war in Ukraine
International team led by Münster researchers studies psychological consequences of the war The outbreak of Russia's war of aggression against Ukraine almost two years ago led internationally to a collective downturn in people's sense of well-being - irrespective of age, gender, political views or any other attributes which the people questioned had.

Psychology - 20.02.2024
Lack of visual imagery does not lead to less pleasure in reading
When people read a book, they typically imagine the story in their heads. But how do people experience a story if they find it difficult or impossible to imagine what is being described? Cognitive scientist Laura Speed and her colleagues found in an initial study of reading in people with so-called aphantasia that they do not enjoy reading less, but they do become less engaged with a story.

Psychology - Health - 20.02.2024
Understanding the relationship between our sleep, body clock and mental health
Problems with our sleep and internal body clock can trigger or worsen a range of psychiatric disorders, according to a new review of recent research evidence. The review, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , suggests gaining a better understanding of the relationship between sleep, circadian rhythms and mental health could unlock new holistic treatments to alleviate mental health problems.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.02.2024
Converting rainforest to plantation impacts food webs and biodiversity
Converting rainforest to plantation impacts food webs and biodiversity
The conversion of rainforest into plantations erodes and restructures food webs and fundamentally changes the way these ecosystems function, according to a new study published in Nature. The findings provide the first insights into the processing of energy across soil and canopy animal communities in mega-biodiverse tropical ecosystems.

Psychology - Health - 20.02.2024
Stress during pregnancy can lead to early maturation of first-born daughters
Stress during pregnancy can lead to early maturation of first-born daughters
UCLA-led research team's study is the first to identify earlier adrenal puberty as a result of prenatal stress Health + Behavior UCLA-led research team's study is the first to identify earlier adrenal puberty as a result of prenatal stress Key takeaways A UCLA-led research team found a correlation between certain aspects of early puberty in first-born daughters and high levels of prenatal stress in their mothers.

Health - 20.02.2024
Key cells in chronic sarcoidosis uncovered
The latest research findings from MedUni Vienna provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying chronic sarcoidosis, a complex granulomatous disease with limited treatment options. The scientific team, led by Thomas Weichhart and Georg Stary, presents new findings that challenge the conventional understanding of the disease and proposes a new therapeutic approach.
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