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Results 21 - 40 of 1696.


Health - Life Sciences - 18.04.2019
Microbiomes of diabetic foot ulcers are associated with clinical outcomes
MADISON - New research suggests that the microbial communities associated with chronic wounds common in diabetic patients affect whether those wounds heal or lead to amputations. Work led by University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Professor of Medical Microbiology and Immunology Lindsay Kalan and her colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania found that particular strains of the common pathogen Staphylococcus aureus exclusively infected diabetic foot ulcers that never healed, indicating these strains may delay healing.

Physics - Materials Science - 18.04.2019
Electric Skyrmions Charge Ahead for Next-Generation Data Storage
Electric Skyrmions Charge Ahead for Next-Generation Data Storage
Berkeley Lab-led research team makes a chiral skyrmion crystal with electric properties; puts new spin on future information storage applications VIDEO: Simulation of a single polar skyrmion. Red arrows signify that this is a left-handed skyrmion. The other arrows represent the angular distribution of the dipoles.

Astronomy / Space Science - 18.04.2019
New satellite data sets reveal flood risk for vulnerable populations
Scientists from the University of Bristol have modelled the likelihood of flooding in some of the world's most hazardous zones to an unparalleled degree of accuracy. Their insights could help people and governments better protect themselves against risk and flood losses. As reported today (Thursday 18 April), experts in flood risk and environmental uncertainty analysed detailed hazard maps of 18 countries across Latin America, Asia and Africa against data developed by Facebook's Connectivity Labs detailing population density in those countries.

Health - 17.04.2019
Risk factors identified for patients undergoing knee replacements
Risk factors identified for patients undergoing knee replacements
In the largest study of its kind, researchers from the Musculoskeletal Research Unit at the University of Bristol have identified the most important risk factors for developing severe infection after knee replacement. Patients who are under 60 years of age, males, those with chronic pulmonary disease, diabetes, liver disease, and a higher body mass index are at increased risk of having the joint replacement redone (known as revision) due to infection.

Life Sciences - 17.04.2019
Making room for genome regulation
Making room for genome regulation
Chromatin remodelers have the ability to move nucleosomes, which represent a physical barrier for access to DNA. Work by the group of Dirk Schübeler helps to better understand how remodelers orchestrate the global organization of nucleosomes in mammals. In a study published in Nature, the researchers uncovered how two classes of remodelers selectively mediate the binding of distinct transcription factors.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.04.2019
Scientists restore some functions in a pig’s brain hours after death
Circulation and cellular activity were restored in a pig's brain four hours after its death, a finding that challenges long-held assumptions about the timing and irreversible nature of the cessation of some brain functions after death, Yale scientists report April 17 . The brain of a postmortem pig obtained from a meatpacking plant was isolated and circulated with a specially designed chemical solution.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 17.04.2019
Scientists invent way to trap mysterious ’dark world’ particle at Large Hadron Collider
Now that they've identified the Higgs boson, scientists at the Large Hadron Collider have set their sights on an even more elusive target. All around us is dark matter and dark energy-the invisible stuff that binds the galaxy together, but which no one has been able to directly detect. "We know for sure there's a dark world, and there's more energy in it than there is in ours," said LianTao Wang, a University of Chicago professor of physics who studies how to find signals in large particle accelerators like the LHC.

Health - 17.04.2019
Breast cancer blood test could help to spot relapse earlier
Breast cancer blood test could help to spot relapse earlier
A simple blood test could help to detect breast cancer relapse up to two years earlier than imaging in patients with early-stage breast cancer. In a small study, carried out by the University of Leicester and Imperial College London and funded by Cancer Research UK, researchers showed that the blood test was able to detect 89 per cent of all relapses, on average 8.9 months quicker than imaging.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.04.2019
Mystery arthritis-linked knee bone three times more common than 100 years ago
Mystery arthritis-linked knee bone three times more common than 100 years ago
The fabella, a small bone in the knee once lost to human evolution, has made a surprising resurgence over the last century. We are taught the human skeleton contains 206 bones, but our study challenges this. Dr Michael Berthaume Department of Bioengineering The new findings could help clinicians treating patients with knee issues and provide insight into human evolution over the past 100 years.

Astronomy / Space Science - 17.04.2019
Five planets revealed after 20 years of observation
Five planets revealed after 20 years of observation
A team of astronomers led by the UNIGE has discovered five new planets with periods of revolution between 15 and 40 years. It took 20 years of regular observations to achieve this result. Over 4000 exoplanets have been discovered since the first one in 1995, but the vast majority of them orbit their stars with relatively short periods of revolution.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.04.2019
Remarkable biodiversity in Swiss rivers
Remarkable biodiversity in Swiss rivers
Switzerland's rivers harbour a unique biodiversity. From 2013 to 2018 - in order to assess this diversity in more detail for the first time - scientists from the Fish Ecology & Evolution department systematically collected fish samples (in September and October in each case) from hundreds of rivers and streams.

Politics - Psychology - 16.04.2019
Political fake news: they might be a liar but they’re my liar
An international collaboration has investigated how people perceive politicians when they spread misinformation. The research found supporters of the politicians reduced their belief in misinformation once corrected, yet their feelings towards the political figure remained unchanged if misinformation was presented alongside an equal number of facts.

Life Sciences - 16.04.2019
Stanford statement on fact-finding review related to Dr. Jiankui He
Stanford University issued the following statement regarding the conclusion of a fact-finding review. Following the claim by Chinese scientist Jiankui He that his research team had produced the world's first gene-edited babies, Stanford University undertook a fact-finding review of Dr. He's interactions with several Stanford researchers during and after the time he spent at Stanford as a postdoctoral scholar in 2011-12.

Health - Careers / Employment - 16.04.2019
Workplace wellness programs fail to improve health
Workplace wellness programs have been touted as a powerful tool that can make employees healthier and more productive while reducing health care spending, but the results of a new study suggest such interventions yield less-than-impressive results. The findings by University of Chicago and Harvard University scholars, published April 16 in the Journal of the American Medical Association , raise questions about the effectiveness of such programs offered by 80 percent of large U.S. employers in the $8 billion workplace wellness industry.

Innovation / Technology - History / Archeology - 16.04.2019
Research helps show how technology behind the V&A's Cast Courts underpins the modern world
Research helps show how technology behind the V&A’s Cast Courts underpins the modern world
Sussex research helps show how technology behind the V&A's Cast Courts underpins the modern world Research conducted by a University of Sussex teaching fellow has proved fundamental to the recently restored Cast Courts at the Victoria and Albert Museum, revealing how the developments pioneered by a Victorian manufacturer are relevant today.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 16.04.2019
New drug mimics benefits of ketamine for depression
A new small-molecule drug produced a rapid antidepressant response similar to that of ketamine when tested in mice, a new Yale-led study published April 16 in The Journal of Clinical Investigation shows. The effects of the drug, called NV-5138, in rodent models mimicked the rapid actions of the anesthetic ketamine, a variation of which, Esketamine, was recently approved by the FDA for use in depressed patients who do not respond to other medications.

Health - 16.04.2019
New test could lead to personalized treatments for cystic fibrosis
Cystic fibrosis is a devastating disease caused by mutations in a specific gene, known as the CFTR gene. But not everyone with cystic fibrosis has the same symptoms or responds to drug treatments in the same way. In a new pilot study, researchers from the University of Cambridge and Yale University developed a novel, straightforward way to test multiple drugs on cells obtained from individual patients with cystic fibrosis, raising the possibility of highly personalized drug treatment.

Environment - Chemistry - 16.04.2019
Antwerp researchers make anticancer medicines from wood
New process makes the production of pharmaceuticals more efficient and sustainable. In the near future, fossil raw materials can be replaced in the production of two important anticancer drugs. An interuniversity team with researchers from UAntwerp and KU Leuven developed a process that starts from … wood.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 16.04.2019
£20m centre to enable people with dementia to live in own homes for longer
£20m centre to enable people with dementia to live in own homes for longer
A ground-breaking £20m centre will develop technologies to create dementia-friendly 'Healthy Homes' and provide insights into how dementia develops. The new Care Research & Technology Centre at Imperial College London joins six national discovery science centres that collectively make up the UK Dementia Research Institute (UK DRI) .

Health - 16.04.2019
Artificial intelligence performs as well as experienced radiologists in detecting prostate cancer
Artificial intelligence performs as well as experienced radiologists in detecting prostate cancer
FINDINGS UCLA researchers have developed a new artificial intelligence system to help radiologists improve their ability to diagnose prostate cancer. The system, called FocalNet, helps identify and predict the aggressiveness of the disease evaluating magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, scans, and it does so with nearly the same level of accuracy as experienced radiologists.