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Results 21 - 40 of 2125.


Environment - Health - 15.10.2020
Green earplugs
Green earplugs
Cars, trains, planes: For two thirds of the European population, traffic noise is part of everyday life. However, the right environment can have a major impact on this nuisance, as Empa researchers have found out. Green spaces in urban areas help to make road and railroad noise less of a nuisance. Only in the case of aircraft noise does this seem counterproductive: the greener the surroundings, the more disturbing the aircraft noise.

Transport - Materials Science - 15.10.2020
Volatile for heavy trucks
Volatile for heavy trucks
In future, commercial vehicles will not only have to emit less CO2 but also meet stricter exhaust emission limits. Many experts expect that this could herald the end for fossil diesel. One possible alternative is dimethyl ether: The highly volatile substance burns very cleanly and can be produced from renewable energy.

Materials Science - Physics - 15.10.2020
Hanging by a colored thread
Hanging by a colored thread
High-performance fibres that have been exposed to high temperatures usually lose their mechanical properties undetected and, in the worst case, can tear precisely when lives depend on them. For example, safety ropes used by fire brigades or suspension ropes for heavy loads on construction sites. Empa researchers have now developed a coating that changes color when exposed to high temperatures through friction or fire.

Life Sciences - Physics - 15.10.2020
A Method to Map Brain Circuits in Real Time
A new approach called integrated neurophotonics could allow researchers to track the activity of all the neurons that make up a particular brain circuit. To deepen their understanding of the brain, neuroscientists must be able to map in great detail the neural circuits that are responsible for tasks such as processing sensory information or forming new memories.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 15.10.2020
A new approach boosts lithium-ion battery efficiency and puts out fires, too
Menlo Park, Calif . In an entirely new approach to making lithium-ion batteries lighter, safer and more efficient, scientists at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have reengineered one of the heaviest battery components - sheets of copper or aluminum foil known as current collectors - so they weigh 80% less and immediately quench any fires that flare up.

Environment - 15.10.2020
New benchmark to protect biodiversity after bushfires
New benchmark to protect biodiversity after bushfires
A new study has found up to three quarters of damaged forest needs to be protected from logging after major natural disasters, in order to preserve its biodiversity. According to co-author Professor David Lindenmayer from The Australian National University (ANU), "naturally disturbed" forests are among the most threatened habitats in the world.

Life Sciences - Physics - 15.10.2020
During development, stress fibers help cells keep their shape-and may also regulate size
As organisms develop, mechanical forces exert pressure on their cells, and scientists have long wondered how cells keep their shape-and therefore remain healthy-through the process. Now, a study led in part by a University of Michigan physicist has observed for the first time that cells use tiny fibers called apical stress fibers to help cells retain their shape during development.

Agronomy / Food Science - 15.10.2020
Plant genetic engineering to fight ’hidden hunger’
International research team including University of Göttingen explains advantages of molecular breeding methods More than two billion people worldwide suffer from micronutrient malnutrition due to deficiencies in minerals and vitamins. Poor people in developing countries are most affected, as their diets are typically dominated by starchy staple foods, which are inexpensive sources of calories but contain low amounts of micronutrients.

Physics - 15.10.2020
Altering the properties of 2D materials at the nanometer scale
Altering the properties of 2D materials at the nanometer scale
Scientists have developed a method for changing the physical properties of 2D materials permanently using a nanometric tip. Their approach, which involves deforming the materials, paves the way to using these materials in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Materials all come with their own set of properties - they can be insulating, semi-conducting, metallic, transparent or flexible, for example.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.10.2020
Pediatric cancers share stalled gene-managing enzyme
A wildly out-of-place protein leads to haywire cells in a particularly troublesome type of rare early childhood cancer, according to University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers. Found in the base of the brain, posterior fossa type A ependymomas tumors are difficult to remove via surgery and prove fatal in more than a quarter of children within five years of diagnosis.

Health - 15.10.2020
Scientists develop extremely rapid diagnostic test for Covid-19
Scientists develop extremely rapid diagnostic test for Covid-19
Scientists from Oxford University's Department of Physics have developed an extremely rapid diagnostic test that detects and identifies viruses in less than five minutes. The method, published on the preprint server MedRxiv , is able to differentiate with high accuracy SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, from negative clinical samples, as well as from other common respiratory pathogens such as influenza and seasonal human coronaviruses.

Environment - 15.10.2020
Laser technology measures biomass in world’s largest trees
Laser technology has been used to measure the volume and biomass of giant Californian redwood trees for the first time, records a new study by UCL researchers. The technique, published in Nature Scientific Reports journal, offers unprecedented insights into the 3D structure of trees, helping scientists to estimate how much carbon they absorb and how they might respond to climate change.

Life Sciences - 15.10.2020
Nervous system mutes or boosts sensory information to make behavioral decisions
Nervous system mutes or boosts sensory information to make behavioral decisions
New study reveals how the nervous system mutes or boosts sensory information to make behavioral decisions Researchers captured 3D images of the regions of the Drosophila central nervous system that are activated in response to noxious stimulation. The posterior medial center (red), which is located between sensoryand motor-related regions of the nervous system, is important for making behavioral decisions.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 15.10.2020
Two planets around a red dwarf
Two planets around a red dwarf
The -SAINT-EX- Observatory, led by scientists from the National Centre of Competence in Research NCCR PlanetS of the University of Bern and the University of Geneva, has detected two exoplanets orbiting the star TOI-1266. The Mexico-based telescope thus demonstrates its high precision and takes an important step in the quest of finding potentially habitable worlds.

Physics - Computer Science - 15.10.2020
Scientists Contribute to New Exploration of Higgs Boson Interactions
Scientists Contribute to New Exploration of Higgs Boson Interactions
Team uses NERSC supercomputer simulations to achieve high-sensitivity analysis of Higgs bosons decaying into pairs of muons A display of a candidate Higgs boson event at CERN's ATLAS experiment in which a Higgs boson decays into two muons. The muons appear as red tracks in this rendering.

Astronomy / Space Science - 15.10.2020
Star Clusters are only the tip of the iceberg
Star Clusters are only the tip of the iceberg
A panoramic view of the nearby Alpha Persei star cluster and its corona. The member stars in the corona are invisible. These are only revealed thanks to the combination of precise measurements with the ESA Gaia satellite and innovative machine learning tools (© Stefan Meingast, made with Gaia Sky) A telescopic view of the star cluster NGC 2516.

Social Sciences - Politics - 15.10.2020
Empathy exacerbates discussions about immigration
Empathy exacerbates discussions about immigration
If both camps take a more empathetic approach when there's an argument, it generally makes it easier to listen to what the other side is saying and alleviate tension. This isn't the case, however, when the conflict is about immigration. Discussions about immigration are heated, even antagonistic. But what happens when supporters and opponents undertake to show more empathy and engage in perspective taking, two types of behaviour that can ease tension?

Politics - Environment - 15.10.2020
Unequal distribution of research into marine resources
Unequal distribution of research into marine resources
Exploration and utilisation of resources from the world's oceans is not equally distributed across the globe. Although many of these resources originate in the Global South, they are mostly being researched by just a few countries from the North. Accordingly, this is also where most of the benefits and profits are flowing to, despite the Convention on Biological Diversity.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.10.2020
Non-routine testing of patients with suspected Covid-19 ’of little benefit’ to assess risk
Non-routine testing of patients with suspected Covid-19 to help predict their prognosis on admission to emergency departments offers limited benefit and could have significant cost implications, according to a collaborative evaluation by Cardiff University and the University Hospital of Wales. Researchers drew together laboratory and clinical findings at Wales's largest hospital from the first wave of the pandemic using a newly created electronic healthcare resource, aimed at learning from routine care in the NHS.

Physics - 15.10.2020
Need to be in two places at once? It may be possible
Quantum physics has demonstrated that tiny particles can exist in multiple places at once, but a new method may prove that it is possible for larger, visible objects to also exist in multiple places. Physicists have been investigating this possibility for almost a century, and now a University of Queensland-led international collaboration has suggested that a tiny heat-seeking tool may finally provide the answer.

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