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Results 21 - 40 of 1569.


Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2022
Molecular mechanism involved in the cholesterol cell transport
Molecular mechanism involved in the cholesterol cell transport
A team of the UB and the August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS) identified a mechanism involved in the movement of cholesterol inside the cells. The study, published in the Journal of Cell Biology , shows how the SNX13 protein plays a key role when transporting this lipid outside the liposomes, organelles that conduct cellular digestion.

Environment - Psychology - 17.01.2022
Inciting instead of coercing, 'nudges' prove their effectiveness
Inciting instead of coercing, ’nudges’ prove their effectiveness
A team from the UNIGE demonstrates that certain soft incentive techniques, known as «nudges», are effective in getting people to change their behaviour. To get through challenges such as the pandemic or the climate change, citizens must change their habits and behaviors. But how can this be achieved without resorting to coercive measures? The answer to this question may be the «nudges» that have been gaining popularity over the last decade.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.01.2022
Increasing the capacity of the immune system to kill cancer cells
Increasing the capacity of the immune system to kill cancer cells
UdeM cancer specialist André Veillette and his team at the IRCM unveil a promising approach using molecules found in macophages. Awakening the immune system's instinct for destroying cancer, using two molecules located on the surface of macrophages: that's the promising avenue opening up from recent laboratory work of Dr. André Veillette.

Materials Science - Health - 17.01.2022
Why are zebra mussels so sticky? Study could lead to new industrial coatings, medical adhesives
Why are zebra mussels so sticky? Study could lead to new industrial coatings, medical adhesives
A water tank full of coin-sized invertebrates may not be the first thing you'd expect to see in a materials science and engineering research lab. But Eli Sone , a professor in the department of materials science and engineering in the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, and his team have been studying both zebra and quagga mussels for years in the hope that they can help solve a diverse range of challenges.

Criminology / Forensics - 17.01.2022
Spyware investigations involving University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab reveal targets in El Salvador, Poland: Reports
A joint investigation by the University of Toronto's Citizen Lab and Access Now reveals that dozens of journalists and activists in El Salvador had their cellphones allegedly hacked by Israeli firm NSO Group's Pegasus spyware.  John Scott-Railton The investigation, which identified 35 individuals whose phones were successfully infected with the sophisticated spyware normally used to target criminals, was reported on by the Associated Press , Reuters , the Guardian and other media outlets.

Health - Environment - 17.01.2022
Disinfecting PPE for reuse, recycling
Returning to in-person experiences in February: for more information. Engineering prof Bill Anderson works with NZ researchers to reduce COVID-19 shortages, waste A professor at Waterloo Engineering collaborated with researchers in New Zealand on the development of a method to disinfect personal protective equipment (PPE) for reuse or recycling.

Pedagogy - 17.01.2022
Improving reading skills through action video games
Improving reading skills through action video games
 An Italian-Swiss team demonstrates children reading skills can be improved through a novel child-friendly action video game.   What if video games, instead of being an obstacle to literacy, could actually help children improve their reading abilities? A team from the University of Geneva has joined forces with scientists from the University of Trento in Italy to test an action video game for children, which would enhance reading skills.

Economics / Business - 17.01.2022
Working in isolated environments enables culture of bullying among elite chefs
Bullying, violence and aggressive behaviour among chefs employed in fine dining restaurants is enabled by their working environments, research from Cardiff University has found. The study shows how working in closed, hidden away kitchen environments left chefs feeling isolated and led to a sense that they could act in ways that would not be possible elsewhere.

Astronomy / Space Science - 17.01.2022
Palomar Survey Instrument Analyzes Impact of Starlink Satellites
Since 2019, SpaceX has been launching an increasing number of internet satellites into orbit around Earth. The satellite constellation, called Starlink, now includes nearly 1,800 members orbiting at altitudes of about 550 kilometers. Astronomers have expressed concerns that that these objects, which can appear as streaks in telescope images, could hamper their scientific observations.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.01.2022
Australians are living longer from lockdowns
Australians are living longer from lockdowns
Pandemic restrictions have led to longer life expectancy for Australians, a new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has found.    A silver lining to seemingly endless days in lockdown is that Australians' life expectancy jumped in 2020. Instead of the expected average annual increase in longevity of 0.09-0.14 years seen from 2015 to 2019, researchers found an increase of 0.7 years from 2019 to 2020 for both females and males.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.01.2022
Genetic Strategy Reverses Insecticide Resistance
Researchers replace resistant gene with susceptible counterpart, opening the door to new methods that could fight malaria and reduce pesticide use Insecticides play a central role in efforts to counter global impacts of mosquito-spread malaria and other diseases, which cause an estimated 750,000 deaths each year.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.01.2022
New dual benefit mode of action for a drug candidate to fight Covid-19
New dual benefit mode of action for a drug candidate to fight Covid-19
A research team led by Prof. Stephan Ludwig, a virologist at the Institute of Virology at the University of Münster, has found a new dual attack mode of action while working on the development of a drug candidate against SARS-CoV-2 infections. This could constitute the basis for a broadly effective drug to fight Covid 19.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.01.2022
Nuclei-free Cells Prove Utility in Delivering Therapeutics to Diseased Tissues
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health report successfully removing the nucleus out of a type of ubiquitous cell, known as enucleation, then using the genetically engineered cell as a unique cargo-carrier to deliver therapeutics precisely to diseased tissues.

Psychology - 14.01.2022
Measure eye movements when blinking
Measure eye movements when blinking
Scientists from Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität (WWU) Münster have developed a method to measure the full extent of eye movements during blinks for the first time. The new method uses Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), to take many fast measurements of an entire cross-section of the eye, unlike most common eye tracking that measures only the front of the eyeball.

Chemistry - Physics - 14.01.2022
Scientists overcome a hurdle on the path to renewable-energy storage
Scientists overcome a hurdle on the path to renewable-energy storage
Scientists have observed how catalysts behave at the particle level during water electrolysis. Catalysts play a crucial role in this reaction, in which water splits into hydrogen and oxygen. By shedding light on the underlying mechanism of the functional role of catalysts during the reaction, the scientists have made an important discovery for the design of renewable-energy storage systems.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2022
Scientists uncover 'resistance gene' in deadly E. coli
Scientists uncover ’resistance gene’ in deadly E. coli
Scientists have pinpointed a gene that helps deadly E. coli bacteria evade antibiotics, potentially leading to better treatments for millions of people worldwide. The University of Queensland-led study found a particular form of the bacteria - E. coli ST131 - had a previously unnoticed gene that made it highly resistant to commonly prescribed antibiotics.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.01.2022
Protective gene variant against COVID-19 identified
Protective gene variant against COVID-19 identified
An international metastudy conducted by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, the Lady Davis Institute of the Jewish General Hospital in Canada and VA Boston Healthcare System in the U.S. has identified a specific gene variant that protects against severe COVID-19 infection. The researchers managed to pinpoint the variant by studying people of different ancestries; a feat they say highlights the importance of conducting clinical trials that include people of diverse descents.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.01.2022
Link between brain cell development and risk of schizophrenia
Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered new links between the breakdown in brain cell development and the risk of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Genetic risk factors are known to disrupt brain development in a number of these disorders, but little is known about which aspects of this process are affected.

Environment - 13.01.2022
Damaging microplastic particles stay trapped in rivers
Damaging microplastic particles stay trapped in rivers
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email Swirling river waters can trap lightweight microplastics that otherwise might be expected to float - depositing them in riverbeds where it can take up to seven years to transport them just a kilometre further towards the ocean, a new study reveals.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 13.01.2022
'Slushy' magma ocean led to formation of the Moon's crust
’Slushy’ magma ocean led to formation of the Moon’s crust
Scientists have shown how the freezing of a 'slushy' ocean of magma may be responsible for the composition of the Moon's crust. Cooling of the early magma ocean drove such vigorous convection that crystals remained suspended as a slurry, like the crystals in a slushy machine. Jerome Neufeld The scientists, from the University of Cambridge and the Ecole normale supérieure de Lyon, have proposed a new model of crystallisation, where crystals remained suspended in liquid magma over hundreds of millions of years as the lunar 'slush' froze and solidified.