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Results 21 - 40 of 1434.

Physics/Materials Science - Astronomy
16.11.2017
Observatory in Mexico sheds light on origin of excess positrons in outer space
Observatory in Mexico sheds light on origin of excess positrons in outer space
Some scientists speculate these extra positrons have an exotic origin, such as yet-undetected processes involving dark matter. HAWC, with its wide field of view, measures the gamma rays made by the positrons as they move away from the pulsar. And we see the positrons are not moving fast enough to make it to Earth.
Innovation/Technology - Administration/Government
16.11.2017
Female Tech Entrepreneurs Hampered by Bias Among Male Investors, Study Finds
Female Tech Entrepreneurs Hampered by Bias Among Male Investors, Study Finds
The study's authors analyzed data for nearly 18,000 companies and found that female-founded start-ups have a harder time gaining investor interest and raising money. A new study is highlighting one possible reason women aren't making more headway in Silicon Valley: men prefer to invest in companies run by other men.
Medicine/Pharmacology
16.11.2017
Prototype ear plug sensor could improve monitoring of vital signs
Prototype ear plug sensor could improve monitoring of vital signs
Scientists have developed a sensor that fits in the ear, with the aim of monitoring the heart, brain and lungs functions for health and fitness. In previous pilot studies that involved trialling the device with 24 people, the researchers from Imperial College London have demonstrated the prototype's potential for monitoring brain, heart and breathing activity.
Life Sciences - Earth Sciences
16.11.2017
Fossil that fills missing evolutionary link named after UChicago professors
Profs. Susan Kidwell and David Jablonski with the Jablonskipora kidwellae fossil, a tiny marine creature named after them. Lurking in oceans, rivers and lakes around the world are tiny, ancient animals known to few people. Bryozoans, tiny marine creatures that live in colonies, are "living fossils"-their lineage goes back to the time when multi-celled life was a newfangled concept.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
16.11.2017
Species in the north are more vulnerable to climate change
Species in the north are more vulnerable to climate change
For the first time, researchers have proposed the hypothesis that animals that live in climate zones at a safe distance from both the poles as well as the tropics have the most to gain from acclimating to changes in climate. The findings contradict previous research in the field. Acclimation means the ability of both animals and plants to adjust their physiology when it gets hotter or colder.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.11.2017
Stress can lead to risky decisions
Stress can lead to risky decisions
Making decisions is not always easy, especially when choosing between two options that have both positive and negative elements, such as deciding between a job with a high salary but long hours, and a lower-paying job that allows for more leisure time. MIT neuroscientists have now discovered that making decisions in this type of situation, known as a cost-benefit conflict, is dramatically affected by chronic stress.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
16.11.2017
Teenage depression linked to father's depression
Teenage depression linked to father’s depression
Adolescents whose fathers have depressive symptoms are more likely to experience symptoms of depression themselves, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. While the link between mothers' depression and depression in their children is well-established, the new Lancet Psychiatry study is the first to find an association between depression in fathers and their teenaged children, independent of whether the mother has depression, in a large sample in the general population.
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
16.11.2017
The stacked colour sensor
The stacked colour sensor
Red-sensitive, blue-sensitive and green-sensitive colour sensors stacked on top of each other instead of being lined up in a mosaic pattern - this principle could allow image sensors with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity to light to be created.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.11.2017
Genomic study explores evolution of gentle 'killer bees' in Puerto Rico
Genomic study explores evolution of gentle ’killer bees’ in Puerto Rico
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — A genomic study of Puerto Rico's Africanized honey bees - which are more docile than other so-called “killer bees” - reveals that they retain most of the genetic traits of their African honey bee ancestors, but that a few regions of their DNA have become more like those of European honey bees.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.11.2017
’Mini liver tumours’ created in a dish for the first time
Scientists have created mini biological models of human primary liver cancers, known as organoids, in the lab for the first time. In a paper published , the tiny laboratory models of tumours were used to identify a new drug that could potentially treat certain types of liver cancer. Primary liver cancer is the second most lethal cancer worldwide.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.11.2017
Veni Vidi Vici
Multidrug resistance of microbes poses a serious global threat to human health. Such resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae significantly reduce therapeutic options for the treatment of Klebsiella-induced, potentially fatal pneumonia or sepsis.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
16.11.2017
A new way to store thermal energy
A new way to store thermal energy
In large parts of the developing world, people have abundant heat from the sun during the day, but most cooking takes place later in the evening when the sun is down, using fuel - such as wood, brush or dung - that is collected with significant time and effort. Now, a new chemical composite developed by researchers at MIT could provide an alternative.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.11.2017
Raising ’good’ cholesterol fails to protect against heart disease
Raising so-called 'good' cholesterol by blocking a key protein involved in its metabolism does not protect against heart disease or stroke, according to a large genetic study of 150,000 Chinese adults published in the journal JAMA Cardiology. There are two types of cholesterol in the blood: LDL-C, so-called 'bad' cholesterol, which is carried in low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and HDL-C, so-called 'good' cholesterol which is found in high-density lipoproteins (HDL).
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Physics/Materials Science
15.11.2017
Optically tunable microwave antennas for 5G applications
Optically tunable microwave antennas for 5G applications
Multiband tunable antennas are a critical part of many communication and radar systems. New research by engineers at the University of Bristol has shown significant advances in antennas by using optically induced plasmas in silicon to tune both radiation patterns and operation frequency. Conventional antenna tuning is performed with diodes or Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) switches.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.11.2017
Signalling protein found to drive heart scarring and organ failure
Signalling protein found to drive heart scarring and organ failure
A part of the immune system once thought to prevent organ damage is actually a leading cause of scarring and heart failure, a study has found. Researchers at Imperial College London discovered that a protein called interleukin 11 (IL-11) plays a key role in the scarring process, which in turn causes heart, kidney and liver failure.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
15.11.2017
Amazonian streams found teeming with fish species are lacking protection
Amazonian streams found teeming with fish species are lacking protection
Hundreds of thousands of Amazonian streams are teeming with highly diverse populations of fish species, a new study reveals. Scientists have found that small streams, in areas of the eastern Brazilian Amazon that are a mixture of forest and farmland, contain fauna new to science, as well as very rare species.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.11.2017
Good glucose control could be bad in type 2 diabetes
The common approach of intensive glucose control to achieve low blood sugar targets in type 2 diabetes can increase the risk of mortality, finds a study by Cardiff University. Looking at routine data from over 300,000 people in the UK, collected between 2004 and 2015, researchers found that lower levels of glycated haemoglobin—typically regarded as being good diabetes control—were associated with increased mortality risk, compared to moderate levels, especially in conjunction with intensive treatments that could cause hypoglycaemia.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.11.2017
Improving clinical trials with machine learning
Improving clinical trials with machine learning
Machine learning could improve our ability to determine whether a new drug works in the brain, potentially enabling researchers to detect drug effects that would be missed entirely by conventional statistical tests, finds a new UCL study published today in Brain . "Current statistical models are too simple.
Physics/Materials Science - Astronomy
15.11.2017
Still no sign of dark matter
Still no sign of dark matter
Measurements at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI further constrain theories about the nature of dark matter Experts are largely in agreement that a major portion of the mass in the universe consists of so-called dark matter. Its nature, however, remains completely obscure. One kind of hypothetical elementary particle that might make up the dark matter is the so-called axion.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.11.2017
Gut microbes can protect against high blood pressure
Gut microbes can protect against high blood pressure
Microbes living in your gut may help protect against the effects of a high-salt diet, according to a new study from MIT. The MIT team, working with researchers in Germany, found that in both mice and humans, a high-salt diet shrinks the population of a certain type of beneficial bacteria. As a result, pro-inflammatory immune cells called Th-17 cells grow in number.

 
 
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