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Results 21 - 40 of 1825.


Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 21.02.2019
New Method Discovered: the Secrets of Lactose Digestion Revealed
New Method Discovered: the Secrets of Lactose Digestion Revealed
Around two-thirds of the global adult population cannot digest lactose - milk sugar - due to a deficiency in lactase, the enzyme that is required for lactose digestion in humans. Generally, consumers are unaware of whether they are able to digest the lactose contained in dairy products. However, Agroscope and Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) researchers have now discovered a new method to measure the presence of lactase in the human body, and consequently determine an individual's ability to digest lactose.

Environment - 21.02.2019
How plants learned to save water
How plants learned to save water
02/21/2019 Plants that can manage with less water could make agriculture more sustainable. This is why a research team at the University of Würzburg is investigating how plants control their water balance. Tiny pores on the leaves of plants, called stomata, have a huge influence on the state of our planet.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.02.2019
Bat Influenza Viruses Could Infect Humans
Bat Influenza Viruses Could Infect Humans
Bats don't only carry the deadly Ebola virus, but are also a reservoir for a new type of influenza virus. These newly discovered flu viruses could potentially also attack the cells of humans and livestock, researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown. Seasonal outbreaks of the flu are caused by influenza viruses that can only infect people.

Physics - Chemistry - 21.02.2019
ANU at the forefront of ground-breaking solar research
ANU at the forefront of ground-breaking solar research
Scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) have made a fresh series of breakthroughs that could help further revolutionise solar technology - making it more efficient, and more accessible - following major discoveries last year. The team from ANU have been concentrating on the solar cell's skin layer, which is 1,000 times thinner than a human hair, and is used to conduct electricity and protect the solar cell.

Health - 21.02.2019
Supporting driver retirement for people with dementia
Researchers are calling for Australia's system of managing driver retirement for people with dementia to be overhauled. A University of Queensland study found a lack of suitable screening and assessment measures remained an issue for General Practitioners. Dr Theresa Scott of the UQ School of Psychology said the research revealed a number of complexities in the existing system.

Environment - 21.02.2019
Tangle of shorebird policy unpicked
Research has shown that international cooperation has been critical in protecting migratory shorebirds in the Asia Pacific, but ongoing challenges exist. The University of Queensland-led study surveyed and analysed the international policy framework for conserving shorebirds migrating within the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, one of four major global migratory waterbird flyways.

Life Sciences - 20.02.2019
Lack of sleep is not necessarily fatal for flies
Male flies kept awake do not die earlier than those allowed to sleep, leading researchers to question whether sleep is essential for staying alive. The team behind the research, from Imperial College London, suggest that for flies sleep may not perform a vital biological function in the way that food does.

Environment - 20.02.2019
How coral bleaching threatens Caribbean communities
How coral bleaching threatens Caribbean communities
Climate change is fueling coral bleaching throughout the tropics, with potentially devastating consequences on coral reef ecosystems and on the people who depend on them for seafood, tourism and shoreline protection. A new study, published Feb.

Life Sciences - 20.02.2019
A prosthetic that restores the sense of where your hand is
A prosthetic that restores the sense of where your hand is
Researchers have developed a next-generation bionic hand that allows amputees to regain their proprioception. The results of the study, which have been published in Science Robotics, are the culmination of ten years of robotics research. The next-generation bionic hand, developed by researchers from EPFL, the Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies in Pisa and the A. Gemelli University Polyclinic in Rome, enables amputees to regain a very subtle, close-to-natural sense of touch.

Veterinary Science - Life Sciences - 20.02.2019
Reveals why the zebra got its stripes
Reveals why the zebra got its stripes
Why do zebras have stripes' A study published in PLOS ONE today [Wednesday 20 February] takes us another step closer to answering this puzzling question and to understanding how stripes actually work. The evolution of the zebra's two-tone coat has intrigued scientists for over 150 years. Many theories have been proposed, including avoiding predators, better heat regulation and a social function, yet there is still no agreement between scientists.

Business / Economics - 20.02.2019
How to save a seabird
How to save a seabird
In the 1990s, the endangered status of the short-tailed albatross catalyzed efforts to reduce the number of birds accidentally killed as bycatch in Alaska, home to the country's biggest fisheries.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 20.02.2019
A Volcanic Binge And Its Frosty Hangover
A Volcanic Binge And Its Frosty Hangover
A major volcanic event could have triggered one of the largest glaciations in Earth's history - the Gaskiers glaciation, which turned the Earth into a giant snowball approximately 580 million years ago. Researchers from Heidelberg University and colleagues from Mexico have discovered remnants of such a large igneous province that resulted from vast lava flows.

Environment - 20.02.2019
Floating research station to illuminate Lake Geneva
Floating research station to illuminate Lake Geneva
Our lakes are unique resources for us and for nature, providing water for drinking and irrigation, habitats for fish, plants and small animals, and space for relaxation and fun. But these sensitive ecosystems are under pressure. In addition to the problems associated with changing land use and inputs of nutrients and pollutants, climate change is also affecting the lakes in our Alpine regions.

Astronomy / Space Science - 20.02.2019
Is Neptune's newest moon a chip off the old block?
Is Neptune’s newest moon a chip off the old block?
The solar system can be a violent place. Astronomers now think that Neptune's tiniest moon, Hippocamp, was chipped off a larger moon, Proteus, by a cosmic collision billions of years ago. The moon was uncovered in Hubble Space Telescope photographs taken in 2013 and has puzzled astronomers ever since.

Physics - 20.02.2019
Of quark speeds finds a solution for a 35-year physics mystery
Of quark speeds finds a solution for a 35-year physics mystery
Number of proton-neutron pairs determine how fast the particles move, results suggest. MIT physicists now have an answer to a question in nuclear physics that has puzzled scientists for three decades: Why do quarks move more slowly inside larger atoms? Quarks, along with gluons, are the fundamental building blocks of the universe.

Pharmacology - Health - 20.02.2019
Long-term benefits from intensive therapy in early stages of MS
New findings by researchers at Cardiff University suggest that intensive therapy during the early stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) leads to better long-term outcomes for patients, despite it often being viewed as a riskier option than other first line treatments. Dr Emma Tallantyre, from Cardiff University's Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, said: “Over the last 10-20 years we have seen huge advances in the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS, with over 12 licensed medications having been shown to suppress disease activity.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 20.02.2019
Cosmic dust forms in supernovae blasts
Scientists claim to have solved a longstanding mystery as to how cosmic dust, the building blocks of stars and planets, forms across the Universe. Cosmic dust contains tiny fragments or organic material and is spread out across the Universe. The dust is primarily formed in stars and is then blown off in a slow wind or a massive star explosion.

Health - 20.02.2019
Yale first in Connecticut to offer advanced cardiac test
Radiologists and cardiologists at Yale School of Medicine are the first in Connecticut and among the first in the Northeast to use a new personalized cardiac test that can predict the need for cardiac catheterizations. Patients at Yale-New Haven Hospital are the first in the region to benefit from this new technology for analyzing blood flow to the heart.

Pharmacology - Health - 20.02.2019
New Method Identifies Which Asthma Patients Respond to Systemic Corticosteroids
Computational tool could help relieve suffering for patients not helped by mainline therapy Physicians will be able to predict which of their patients with severe asthma are likely to benefit from treatment with systemic corticosteroids - and which might only suffer their side effects - with help from a dozen clinical variables researchers have identified using machine learning techniques.

Innovation / Technology - Politics - 20.02.2019
Top Smart Cities are Global Cities
An unprecedented global study has analysed and ranked leading cities in the worldwide “smart city” phenomenon. Based on a comprehensive webometric study, in total 27 cities made it onto the list of the world's leading smart cities, led by London, Singapore and Barcelona. The group of 27 were whittled down from a full list of over 5550 worldwide cities with 100,000 inhabitants or more.