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Sport Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
20.02.2018
Fake news 'vaccine': online game may 'inoculate' by simulating propaganda tactics
Fake news ’vaccine’: online game may ’inoculate’ by simulating propaganda tactics
A new experiment, launching today online, aims to help 'inoculate' against disinformation by providing a small dose of perspective from a "fake news tycoon".
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.02.2018
National study to shed light on aging
McGill medical professor Christina Wolfson is one of the principal investigators for the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging, a long-term research project involving 50,000 participants from across the country (Photo: Owen Egan) by Brenda Branswell Source: McGill News Magazine Imagine getting a phone call asking if you'd like to take part in a study..
Business/Economics - Medicine/Pharmacology
20.02.2018
Financial pain after hospitalization
Financial pain after hospitalization
Being hospitalized is tough enough strictly as a health matter. But now a study co-authored by an MIT professor reveals its painful financial impact as well: On aggregate, hospitalization and the health problems that cause it lead to a 20 percent drop in earnings and an 11 percent drop in employment for adults between ages 50 and 59, among other negative effects.
Life Sciences - History/Archeology
19.02.2018
Ancient genome study identifies traces of indigenous
Ancient genome study identifies traces of indigenous "Taíno" in present-day Caribbean populations
A thousand-year-old tooth has provided genetic evidence that the so-called "Taíno", the first indigenous Americans to feel the full impact of European colonisation after Columbus arrived in the New World, still have living descendants in the Caribbean today. It has always been clear that people in the Caribbean have Native American ancestry, but it was difficult to prove whether this was specifically indigenous to the Caribbean, until now.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
19.02.2018
Plants colonised the earth 100 million years earlier than previously thought
Plants colonised the earth 100 million years earlier than previously thought
A new study on the timescale of plant evolution, led by the University of Bristol, has concluded that the first plants to colonise the Earth originated around 500 million years ago - 100 million years earlier than previously thought. For the first four billion years of Earth's history, our planet's continents would have been devoid of all life except microbes.
Medicine/Pharmacology
19.02.2018
Heart attack symptoms often misinterpreted in younger women
Young women who report heart attack symptoms are more likely to have them dismissed by their providers as not heart related, a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health (YSPH) finds. The research, published in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association , examined the relationship between gender, self-reported symptoms, perception of symptoms, and self-reported care-seeking among patients 55 years and younger who were hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (AMI).
Life Sciences
19.02.2018
The greening of planet Earth
The first plants to colonise the planet originated around 500 million years ago, much earlier than has previously been suggested by the fossil record, a new study has suggested. For the first four billion years of Earth's history, the planet's continents would have been devoid of all life except microbes.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.02.2018
Calcium may play a role in the development of Parkinson's disease
Calcium may play a role in the development of Parkinson’s disease
Researchers have found that excess levels of calcium in brain cells may lead to the formation of toxic clusters that are the hallmark of Parkinson's disease. This is the first time we've seen that calcium influences the way alpha-synuclein behaves. Janin Lautenschl'ger The international team, led by the University of Cambridge, found that calcium can mediate the interaction between small membranous structures inside nerve endings, which are important for neuronal signalling in the brain, and alpha-synuclein, the protein associated with Parkinson's disease.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Innovation/Technology
19.02.2018
Taking blood without a needle
Taking blood without a needle
EPFL-based startup Loop Medical is working on a needleless device to take pain-free blood samples at home.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.02.2018
A therapeutic approach inspired by nature
A therapeutic approach inspired by nature
T3 Pharmaceuticals AG - a startup from the University of Basel - genetically modifies bacteria and wants to use this to develop new cancer therapies.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
19.02.2018
Blood and urine tests developed to indicate autism in children
o Test believed to be the first of its kind o Link found between autism and damage to proteins in blood plasma o Could lead to earlier diagnosis of the condition New tests which can indicate autism in children have been developed by researchers at the University of Warwick. The academic team who conducted the international research believe that their new blood and urine tests which search for damage to proteins are the first of their kind.
Civil Engineering/Traffic Engineering
19.02.2018
The bridge that stretches
The bridge that stretches
Bridges change shape, which is why they are usually built with expansion joints. At TU Wien, a technology has been developed that makes it possible to forego these joints, thus saving time and money. You can feel it straight away when you drive over a bridge quickly: the expansion joint that you rumble over at the start and end of the bridge.
Environment/Sustainable Development
19.02.2018
Dispersal of Fish Eggs by Water Birds - Just a Myth?
Dispersal of Fish Eggs by Water Birds - Just a Myth?
How do fish end up in isolated bodies of water when they can't swim there themselves' For centuries, researchers have assumed that water birds transfer fish eggs into these waters - however, a systematic literature review by researchers at the University of Basel has shown that there is no evidence of this to date.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
17.02.2018
Hope remains to save the world's most trafficked animal as it enjoys the spotlight of a global day in its honour
Hope remains to save the world’s most trafficked animal as it enjoys the spotlight of a global day in its honour
Hope remains to save the world's most trafficked animal as it enjoys the spotlight of a global day in its honour Did you know that the world's most trafficked animal is having its own international day today? On World Pangolin Day , the University of Sussex is determined to raise awareness of the mammal's plight as they face a desperate fight against extinction.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.02.2018
Regional brain shrinkage in MS predicts disability
Regional brain shrinkage in MS predicts disability
A UCL-led research team has identified the pattern of brain tissue loss in multiple sclerosis, enabling improved prediction of disability progression. The study, published in Annals of Neurology , was one of the largest brain imaging studies ever conducted investigating multiple sclerosis (MS). "It's well known that brain atrophy occurs in people with MS and varies by region, but we typically only measure the shrinkage of the whole brain.
Chemistry
16.02.2018
Complex plants were first to conquer land
The first plants to conquer land were a much more complex species than has previously been assumed, new research has shown. Before the first land plants appeared on Earth around half a billion years ago, Earth would have looked unrecognisable with no grass, trees or even mosses. Up until now, mosses and their relatives the hornworts and liverworts have been regarded as the first true plants on dry land.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.02.2018
New approaches in neuroscience show it’s not all in your head
Our own unique experiences shape how we view the world and respond to the events in our lives. But experience is highly subjective. What's distressing or joyful to one person may be very different to another. These differences can matter, especially as a growing body of research shows that what happens in our inner landscapes - our thoughts about and interpretations of our experiences - can have physical consequences in our brains and bodies.
Environment/Sustainable Development
16.02.2018
Laser technology reveals the weight of some of UK's and world's biggest trees
Laser technology reveals the weight of some of UK’s and world’s biggest trees
New laser scanning technology is being used by UCL scientists to provide fresh and unprecedented insights into the structure and mass of trees, a development that will help plot how much carbon they absorb and how they might respond to climate change. Two studies, published today (Friday) by the Royal Society, by researchers at UCL and the universities of Oxford, Sonoma State, Ghent and Wageningen, reveal the technology has captured the 3D structure of individual trees in ways they have never been seen before.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
16.02.2018
Electrical steel: Strong magnetic fields due to sharp tools
Electrical steel: Strong magnetic fields due to sharp tools
Research news In an electric drive, magnetic fields have to be created in order to transform electric energy into kinetic energy. The magnetic properties of the motor's main components, referred to as electrical steel sheets, are the decisive factor in the efficiency of the electric motor. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have investigated the way these steel sheets are processed and have concluded that using blunt cutting tools deteriorates the magnetic properties of the steel sheets significantly.
Earth Sciences
16.02.2018
Scientists eavesdrop on volcanic rumblings to forecast eruptions
Sound waves generated by burbling lakes of lava atop some volcanoes point to greater odds of magmatic outbursts. This finding could provide advance warning to people who live near active volcanoes. A new study has shown that monitoring inaudible low frequencies called infrasound produced by a type of active volcano could improve the forecasting of significant, potentially deadly eruptions.