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Results 21 - 40 of 1588.


Life Sciences - 21.06.2019
Blue Pigment from Engineered Fungi Could Help Turn the Textile Industry Green
A new platform for producing blue pigment could provide a sustainable alternative to conventional synthetic dyes and open the door for next-generation bioproduction Lead researcher Aindrila Mukhopadhyay holds a vial of purified indigoidine crystals. (Credit: Marilyn Chung/Berkeley Lab) Often, the findings of fundamental scientific research are many steps away from a product that can be immediately brought to the public.

Materials Science - Environment - 21.06.2019
Perovskite solar cells tested for real-world performance - in the lab
Perovskite solar cells tested for real-world performance - in the lab
Researchers bring diurnal and seasonal variations into the lab to test the performance of perovskite solar cells under realistic conditions. It was only ten years ago that metal-halide perovskites were discovered to be photovoltaic materials. Today, perovskite solar cells made are almost as efficient as the best conventional silicon ones, and there is much hope that they will become a highly efficient and low-cost alternative, as they can be manufactured by rather simple and fast methods like printing.

Health - 21.06.2019
Detecting problems of the anti-bleeding system in 60 minutes
Detecting problems of the anti-bleeding system in 60 minutes
Researchers from the Universities of Geneva and Franche-Comté have developed an innovative device that investigates a patient's platelet capacity in near real-life conditions so that bleeding can be stopped (haemostasis). Various diseases can cause haemorrhages or thromboses, sometimes fatal, resulting in particular from complications during surgery.

Physics - 21.06.2019
A further step towards reliable quantum computation
A further step towards reliable quantum computation
Physicists develop new method to prove quantum entanglement One of the essential features required for the realization of a quantum computer is quantum entanglement. A team of physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences (ÖAW) introduces a novel technique to detect entanglement even in large-scale quantum systems with unprecedented efficiency.

Life Sciences - 21.06.2019
Neuroscience research questions current alcohol limit
Neuroscience research questions current alcohol limit
New research by neuroscientists from the University of Sussex shows that drinking only one pint of beer or a large glass of wine is enough to significantly compromise a person's sense of agency. Sense of agency is the feeling of being in control of our actions. It is an important aspect of human social behaviour, as it implies knowledge of the consequences of those actions.

Health - Environment - 21.06.2019
No conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators
No conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators
Researchers have found no link between exposure to emissions from municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) and infant deaths or reduced foetal growth. However, they show living closer to the incinerators themselves is associated with a very small increase in the risk of some birth defects, compared to the general population.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
One Third of Cambodians Infected with Threadworm
One Third of Cambodians Infected with Threadworm
Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted threadworm that is endemic in many tropical and subtropical countries. In a nation-wide study in Cambodia, Swiss TPH scientists and their partners found that nearly a third of the population is infected with S. stercoralis. The results were published today in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Business / Economics - 20.06.2019
The richer the booty, the more honest the people
The richer the booty, the more honest the people
The more money there is in a lost wallet, the more likely it is to be returned to its owner, researchers from the Universities of Zurich, Michigan and Utah show in a global study. They explain the surprising result with the fact that dishonest finders have to adapt their self-image, which involves psychological costs that can exceed the material value of the wallet.

Astronomy / Space Science - Health - 20.06.2019
Spaceship Concordia
Spaceship Concordia
Science for the benefit of space exploration does not only happen off planet. While some studies require the weightless isolation of the International Space Station, another location provides the right conditions for investigating the consequences of spaceflight, and it is right here on Earth. The 2018 crew of Concordia research station in Antarctica recently returned to the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne to wrap up their time as researchers and subjects at Earth's most remote outpost.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.06.2019
Bats’ brains sync when they socialize
Socializing bats show highly correlated brain activity, shows a new UC Berkeley study. (Kim Taylor/Warren Photographic photo) The phrase "we're on the same wavelength" may be more than just a friendly saying: A new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers shows that bats' brain activity is literally in sync when bats engage in social behaviors like grooming, fighting or sniffing each other.

Pharmacology - 20.06.2019
Connecting the dots: nitrogen dioxide over Siberian pipelines
Connecting the dots: nitrogen dioxide over Siberian pipelines
New maps that use information from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite reveal emissions of nitrogen dioxide along a Siberian natural gas pipeline that connects the Urengoy gas field - the second-largest gas field in the world - with Europe. The Urengoy-Pomary-Uzhhorod pipeline is one of Russia's main natural gas export pipelines.

Environment - 20.06.2019
Heat kills invasive jumping worm cocoons, could help limit spread
New research out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum shows that temperatures of about 100 degrees Fahrenheit kill the cocoons of invasive jumping worms. That's good news for ecologists and horticulturalists who are working to slow or stop the spread of the worms, which can damage the soils they invade.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.06.2019
Using human genome, scientists build CRISPR for RNA to open pathways for medicine
Less than a decade ago, biology underwent one of those once-in-a-generation events that shakes up a scientific field, when the discovery of gene editing technology called CRISPR/Cas-9 made it possible to precisely alter the sequence of DNA in a living being. But while DNA may be the raw blueprints for life, RNA is the architect-translating those ideas into reality for the cell through proteins and regulation.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
Cancer control: Structure of important transport protein solved
Cancer control: Structure of important transport protein solved
For the first time, Bernese researchers have been able to solve the structure of a transport protein and thus to describe the functional mechanism that plays a significant role in the survival of cancer cells. This is an important step towards developing effective inhibitors and fight tumor growth. Certain cancer cells depend on exporting the metabolite lactate, which accumulates during the generation on energy.

Social Sciences - Health - 20.06.2019
Results Provide Basis for Targeted WASH Interventions in Rohingya Refugee Camp
Results Provide Basis for Targeted WASH Interventions in Rohingya Refugee Camp
Currently, around 910,000 Rohingya refugees live in Cox's Bazar District in Bangladesh after having fled violence faced in Myanmar, resulting in one of the most rapid exoduses in modern history. In a project funded by UNICEF and coordinated by Swiss TPH, a study was conducted to identify and understand WASH practices of the populations living in the camp.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
Software to protect the world's most endangered species
Software to protect the world's most endangered species
By combining genetic and environmental databases, researchers at EPFL are seeking to help biologists identify more accurately the animal and plant species most exposed to climate change, in order to develop appropriate conservation methods. Northern Morocco is home to a type of sheep that has a specific gene, developed over thousands of years of evolution.

Environment - Transport - 20.06.2019
Record efficiency for a gas engine
Record efficiency for a gas engine
At the end of May, the final meeting of the "Horizon 2020" project "GasOn" with the EU Commission took place in Brussels. The aim of this EU project was the further development of gas engines for cars and vans. Around 20 partners participated, including ETH Zurich and Empa as well as four European automobile manufacturers and well-known suppliers.

Health - Physics - 20.06.2019
Researchers harness AI to combat colon cancer
Researchers harness AI to combat colon cancer
Engineers have shown that it is technically possible to use an AI system to guide a tiny robotic capsule inside the colon to take microultrasound images. Known as a ‘Sonopill', the device could spell the end for painful endoscopic examinations for patients, where a semi-rigid scope is passed into the bowel.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 20.06.2019
How in times of trouble animals also stand together
How in times of trouble animals also stand together
Faced with potential violence from rival factions, dwarf mongoose groupmates pull together and behave more co-operatively, according to a new study by University of Bristol researchers published today [Thursday 20 June]. Conflict between rival groups is common throughout the animal world, from ants to chimpanzees, but its consequences have been little studied.

Physics - Chemistry - 19.06.2019
A crystal with a twist
UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab researchers created a new crystal built of a spiraling stack of atomically thin germanium sulfide sheets. (UC Berkeley image by Yin Liu) With a simple twist of the fingers, one can create a beautiful spiral from a deck of cards. In the same way, scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have created new inorganic crystals made of stacks of atomically thin sheets that unexpectedly spiral like a nanoscale card deck.