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Results 21 - 40 of 1719.


Health - 16.10.2019
Scientists link hormone production in baby wallabies to how some human girls are born with genitalia that appear more male than female
Research led by the Universities of Birmingham and Manchester has made a connection between the way baby wallabies produce male hormones and how some human girls are born with genitalia that resemble those of a boy. The research, published in PNAS and supported by the Wellcome Trust and the Medical Research Council, shows that an alternative pathway to the production of active male hormones - previously identified in the tammar wallaby pouch young - is present and active during human fetal development.

Earth Sciences - 16.10.2019
Q&A: 30 years after the Loma Prieta earthquake
Immune markers and pollutant levels in the blood indicate wildfire smoke may be more harmful to children's health than smoke from a controlled burn, Stanford researchers found. The realities of subsistence living in a region of Senegal hard hit by schistosomiasis make reinfection likely, despite mass drug administration.

Politics - 16.10.2019
Renewing Political Speech and Speech writing report launched at Parliament
Politicians need to get people to trust them more if they want their speeches to be heard says a new report launched by the University of Birmingham and the University of East Anglia. The research project " The Crisis of Rhetoric: Renewing Political Speech and Speechwriting " argues that public debate and the freedom to make arguments and counterarguments are essential for democracy.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.10.2019
Focuses on repair and reversal of damage caused by Huntington’s disease
A new study examining the role that star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes play in Huntington's disease has identified a potential strategy that may halt the disease and repair some of the damage it causes. Astrocytes interact with and support neurons, or nerve cells, and other brain cells. Although astrocytes outnumber neurons, little is known about how they interact with synapses, the junctions between neurons that enable them to communicate and convey messages to each other.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 16.10.2019
Computational "Match Game" Identifies Potential Antibiotics
CMU software tool speeds discovery using microbial datasets Computational biologists at Carnegie Mellon University have devised a software tool that can play a high-speed "Match Game" to identify bioactive molecules and the microbial genes that produce them so they can be evaluated as possible antibiotics and other therapeutic agents.

Astronomy / Space Science - 16.10.2019
Astronomer gets best look at first comet from outside our solar system
David Jewitt, a UCLA professor of planetary science and astronomy, has captured the best and sharpest look at a comet from outside of our solar system that recently barged into our own. It is the first interstellar comet astronomers have observed. Comet 2I/Borisov (the “I” stands for interstellar) is following a path around the sun at a blazing speed of approximately 110,000 miles per hour, or about as fast as Earth travels around the sun.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.10.2019
Diabetes: a next-generation therapy soon available?
Diabetes: a next-generation therapy soon available?
By identifying a protein that helps regulate blood glucose and lipids, researchers at UNIGE hope for the rapid development of treatments more effective than current insulin therapy. Insulin, a hormone essential for regulating blood sugar and lipids, is normally produced by pancreatic - cells. In many people with diabetes, however, pancreatic cells are not (or no longer) functional, causing a chronic and potentially fatal insulin deficiency that can only be controlled through daily insulin injections.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.10.2019
Important species interactions can destabilize aquatic ecosystems in response to nutrient inputs
Important species interactions can destabilize aquatic ecosystems in response to nutrient inputs
Ecosystems provide numerous benefits, supplying food, clean water and other resources. So, it is vital that ecosystem stability is maintained in the face of disturbances such as drought, heatwaves or nutrient inputs. Nutrient inputs can be particularly problematic in aquatic ecosystems if they lead to algal blooms.

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 16.10.2019
Potential answer to pain found in the mud
Potential answer to pain found in the mud
A sample of estuarine mud taken 16 years ago has yielded a potential new class of painkiller as potent as opioids, but without their disadvantages. Researchers from The University of Queensland and University of Sydney have filed a patent application for the potential drug, which is a modified version of a molecule found in a Penicillium fungus, and published their results in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA .

Life Sciences - Health - 16.10.2019
Raw Meat-Based Diets for Pets Pose a Health Risk for Humans
Multidrug-resistant bacteria are found in half of all dog foods made from raw meat, researchers from the University of Zurich have found. Feeding pets a diet of raw meat, also known as a "BARF" diet, is a growing trend. The resistant bacteria in the raw food can be transmitted to the pets - and thus also to humans.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 16.10.2019
Major implications for global metal demand without industry change
Major implications for global metal demand without industry change
The effects environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks will have on the global supply of metals without major innovations in the mining industry have been highlighted by University of Queensland researchers. Researchers from UQ's Sustainable Minerals Institute (SMI) designed a matrix to assess the ESG context of more than 600 individual copper, iron and bauxite orebodies and then analysed how it may affect global supply.

Business / Economics - Computer Science / Telecom - 15.10.2019
UQ-developed text analytics app now available for all
UQ-developed text analytics app now available for all
Text analytics software developed by The University of Queensland will be available as a ‘Software as a Service' product to individual subscribers for the first time. TopicGuide is Leximancer 's new automated approach to text analytics that uses an algorithm developed by former UQ Health and Behavioural Sciences researcher and the company's chief scientist Dr Andrew Smith to quickly identify key trends, concepts and ideas from large pieces of text.

Astronomy / Space Science - 15.10.2019
Astronomers use giant galaxy cluster as X-ray magnifying lens
Astronomers at the University of Chicago, MIT and elsewhere have used a massive cluster of galaxies as an X-ray magnifying glass to peer back in time, to nearly 9.4 billion years ago. In the process, they spotted a tiny dwarf galaxy in its very first, high-energy stages of star formation. While this technique has been used to magnify objects at optical wavelengths, this is the first time scientists have leveraged it to zoom in on extreme, distant X-ray-emitting phenomena.

Health - Environment - 15.10.2019
Predicting Ebola outbreaks by understanding how ecosystems influence human health
The next Ebola outbreak could be predicted using a new UCL-developed model that tracks how changes to ecosystems and human societies combine to affect the spread of the deadly infectious disease. The model could help policymakers to decide where to target vaccine deployment, or develop healthcare infrastructure, to reduce the risk of zoonotic disease outbreaks - illnesses that spread between animals and humans.

Social Sciences - 15.10.2019
Deaf infants more attuned to parent's visual cues
Deaf infants more attuned to parent’s visual cues
Eye gaze helps infants communicate. Through everyday interactions, eye gaze establishes a social connection between parent and child and is linked to early word learning. But can learning experiences before a baby's first birthday prompt babies to pay more attention to their parent's eye gaze? To test this, a research team led by the University of Washington's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) sought out Deaf infants raised by Deaf parents - families who primarily use visual language and visual cues.

Business / Economics - Environment - 15.10.2019
US green economy worth $1.3 trillion per year
The US green economy is estimated to generate over $1.3 trillion in revenue per year, representing 16.5% of the global green economy, according to a new study by UCL. The green economy - broadly defined as an economy that is low carbon, resource efficient and socially inclusive - is a major source of jobs in the US, employing an estimated 9.5 million people.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.10.2019
Antibody eradicates leukemia stem cells
The introduction of the drug imatinib in 2001 revolutionized the treatment of a type of cancer called chronic myelogenous leukemia. In more than 80% of people with CML who received the drug, the disease went into complete remission. However, in most people with chronic myelogenous leukemia, cancerous stem cells remain in the body for years after their cancer has gone into remission.

Chemistry - 15.10.2019
Platinum breakthrough for cleaner and cheaper catalysts
Scientists have developed a new way of significantly reducing the amount of platinum used in catalysts, opening up a much cheaper and cleaner ways of producing a whole host of commodity chemicals and fuels. Though present in a whole host of catalysts used to speed up chemical reactions in industrial processes, platinum is an extremely expensive metal that produces harmful by-products.

Social Sciences - 15.10.2019
Lowest-paid workers have longest retirements
The lowest-paid workers in the UK have three more years of retirement on average compared to their professional counterparts, but are more likely to suffer ill health after stopping work, a new UCL-led study suggests. The study, published today in The Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health , examined the length of time between stopping work and dying among people in England and Wales born before 1951.

Social Sciences - 15.10.2019
New links between food access and risk of malnutrition for older people
New research has highlighted that food insecurity - a measure of the availability of food and individuals' ability to access it - is putting older people in Scotland at risk of becoming underweight and malnourished. The ongoing study from the University of Glasgow and the Scottish charity Food Train is focused on the current issues facing older adults and food access.

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