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Results 21 - 40 of 2226.


Psychology - Health - 18.04.2024
Happily ever after
Happily ever after
Many people aspire to a successful partnership. But is this success determined by destiny, or does it result from working on the relationship? Researchers from the University of Basel have investigated the role of people's inner convictions on how they approach a relationship and how satisfaction develops over time.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.04.2024
Mutations in noncoding DNA become functional in some cancer-driving genes
Mutations in noncoding DNA become functional in some cancer-driving genes
These regions of the gene alter the abundance of mRNA and the proteins it instructs the cell to make Science + Technology These regions of the gene alter the abundance of mRNA and the proteins it instructs the cell to make Key takeaways Despite progress in defining functional elements of noncoding DNA, it is still not fully understood.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.04.2024
Adolescent stress may raise risk of postpartum depression in adults
Adolescent stress may raise risk of postpartum depression in adults
Study suggests adolescent stress may raise risk of postpartum depression in adults A Johns Hopkins Medicine-led study suggests early-life stress may lead to prolonged elevation of the hormone cortisol after childbirth and in turn, postpartum depression A Johns Hopkins Medicine -led research team reports in a new study that social stress during adolescence in female mice later results in prolonged elevation of the hormone cortisol after they give birth.

Economics - Health - 18.04.2024
CEOs' Human Concern Translates into Higher Stock Price
CEOs’ Human Concern Translates into Higher Stock Price
Compassionate leadership has tangible benefits: CEOs' expressions of empathy correlate with positive stock performance, a study led by the University of Zurich shows. The researchers analyzed data from conference calls between CEOs and financial analysts during the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic prompted an unprecedented financial crisis.

Life Sciences - 18.04.2024
Perfect balance: How the brain fine-tunes its sensitivity
Perfect balance: How the brain fine-tunes its sensitivity
A sensitive perception of the environment is crucial for guiding our behavior. However, an overly sensitive response of the brain's neural circuits to stimuli can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders such as epilepsy. University of Basel researchers report in the journal Nature how neuronal networks in the mouse brain are fine-tuned.

History / Archeology - Religions - 18.04.2024
Antisemitism in the history of Raiffeisen?
Antisemitism in the history of Raiffeisen?
On behalf of Raiffeisen Switzerland Cooperative, researchers examined the beginnings of the Raiffeisen movement in Switzerland. Their focus was on antisemitism as well as Raiffeisen during National Socialism. Raiffeisen Group in Switzerland today has 219 cooperative Raiffeisen banks. It is based on the cooperative movement started by F.W. Raiffeisen in Germany around 1860.

Microtechnics - Materials Science - 18.04.2024
An ink for 3D-printing flexible devices without mechanical joints
An ink for 3D-printing flexible devices without mechanical joints
Researchers are targeting the next generation of soft actuators and robots with an elastomer-based ink for 3D printing objects with locally changing mechanical properties, eliminating the need for cumbersome mechanical joints. For engineers working on soft robotics or wearable devices, keeping things light is a constant challenge: heavier materials require more energy to move around, and - in the case of wearables or prostheses - cause discomfort.

Health - Psychology - 18.04.2024
Results for: UCalgary researchers quantify connection between homelessness and mental health disorders
Results for: UCalgary researchers quantify connection between homelessness and mental health disorders
Researchers say findings point to vital need for specific interventions to support mental health needs of unhoused people Health-care professionals who work with people experiencing homelessness know many of the people may also be living with a mental health disorder. University of Calgary researchers wanted to better understand how often these two things are connected, and what they found surprised them.

Life Sciences - 18.04.2024
Axons follow a signposted path to reach their muscular target
Publication of the IGFL in the journal PNAS on March 19, 2024. News by CNRS Biology on April 12, 2024. During embryonic development, motor neurons, located in the spinal cord, emit extensions - the axons - which must find their way to their targets - the muscle cells. These motoneurons, last link between electrical and mechanical signals in the locomotor system, trigger movement via their axons.

Computer Science - Psychology - 18.04.2024
New research probes effectiveness of AR to improve self-driving car safety
As self-driving cars become more common on our roads, a key question for future road safety is how to balance passengers' desire to relax during their trip while still remaining aware of road hazards and be ready to retake control. Researchers from the University of Glasgow have been testing the potential of augmented reality technology to allow drivers to enjoy the benefits of being driven by an autonomous vehicle while enabling them to quickly take the wheel if required.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 18.04.2024
Using deep learning to image the Earth’s planetary boundary layer
Lincoln Laboratory researchers are using AI to get a better picture of the atmospheric layer closest to Earth's surface. Their techniques could improve weather and drought prediction. Although the troposphere is often thought of as the closest layer of the atmosphere to the Earth's surface, the planetary boundary layer (PBL) - the lowest layer of the troposphere - is actually the part that most significantly influences weather near the surface.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.04.2024
Antipsychotics for dementia linked to more harms than previously acknowledged
Risks highest soon after starting drugs, underscoring need for increased caution in early stages of treatment, say experts Antipsychotic use in people with dementia is associated with higher risks of a wide range of serious health outcomes compared with non-use, according to a new study from a collaboration across the Universities of Manchester, Nottingham, Edinburgh and Dundee.

Astronomy / Space - Chemistry - 17.04.2024
Peptides on Interstellar Ice
Peptides are organic compounds that play a crucial role in many biological processes, for example, as enzymes. A research team led by Dr Serge Krasnokutski from the Astrophysics Laboratory at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the University of Jena had already demonstrated that simple peptides can form on cosmic dust particles.

Environment - 17.04.2024
Group antenatal care still too little known, despite proven benefits
The Horizon2020 programme Group Care for the First 1000 Days is coming to an end. Researchers in seven countries, including three from the VUB, have worked with colleagues in the US to investigate the provision of antenatal care in participating countries. The study looked at group sessions rather than traditional monitoring through individual consultations, as is standard in Belgium.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.04.2024
Researchers help uncover potential breakthrough in treatments for inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s or Colitis)
RVC researchers help uncover potential breakthrough in treatments for inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's or Colitis) Pathologists from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) have been working with scientists from the Francis Crick Institute (FCI) to untangle a complex pathway that could help explain how interactions between microorganisms and the body's immune defences lead to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) like Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

Life Sciences - Environment - 17.04.2024
How soil microbes survive in harsh desert environments
How soil microbes survive in harsh desert environments
As desertification spreads worldwide, scientists discover how desert microbes endure harsh drought periods Prolonged droughts followed by sudden bursts of rainfall - how do desert soil bacteria manage to survive such harsh conditions? This long-debated question has now been answered by an ERC project led by microbiologist Dagmar Woebken from the Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science (CeMESS) at the University of Vienna.

Health - Chemistry - 17.04.2024
AI speeds up drug design for Parkinson's ten-fold
AI speeds up drug design for Parkinson’s ten-fold
Researchers have used artificial intelligence techniques to massively accelerate the search for Parkinson's disease treatments. Machine learning is having a real impact on drug discovery - it's speeding up the whole process of identifying the most promising candidates Michele Vendruscolo The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, designed and used an AI-based strategy to identify compounds that block the clumping, or aggregation, of alpha-synuclein, the protein that characterises Parkinson's.

Life Sciences - Environment - 17.04.2024
Interspecies competition led to even more forms of ancient human - defying evolutionary trends in vertebrates
Interspecies competition led to even more forms of ancient human - defying evolutionary trends in vertebrates
Competition between species played a major role in the rise and fall of hominins, and produced a "bizarre" evolutionary pattern for the Homo lineage. This is almost unparalleled in evolutionary science Laura van Holstein Climate has long been held responsible for the emergence and extinction of hominin species.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 17.04.2024
First Nitrogen-Fixing Organelle
Scientists Discover First Nitrogen-Fixing Organelle " layout="backlink-only" Adapted from a release by Erin Malsbury at UC Santa Cruz Modern biology textbooks assert that only bacteria can take nitrogen from the atmosphere and convert it into a form that is usable for life. Plants that fix nitrogen, such as legumes, do so by harboring symbiotic bacteria in root nodules.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.04.2024
New disease gene for epilepsy and developmental disorder discovered
New disease gene for epilepsy and developmental disorder discovered
GABA A receptors play a central role in the development of epilepsy and developmental disorders, with nine out of 19 GABA A receptor genes already associated with genetic diseases. Now, as part of an international study led by Martin Krenn from MedUni Vienna's Department of Neurology, GABRA4 has been identified as a new disease gene in four cases.