news


Category

Years
2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017 | 2018 | 2019 | 2020 | 2021 | 2022 | 2023 |



Results 21 - 40 of 2357.


Social Sciences - 25.01.2023
SCI weekly research round-up
SCI weekly research round-up
Don't miss out on any article, podcast or presentation by SCI members anymore with our regular research round ups covering any recently published SCI research! SCI Honorary Researcher Tally Katz-Gerro co-published the paper 'Between perceptions and practices: The religious and cultural aspects of food wastage in households' in Appetite .

Life Sciences - 25.01.2023
Mechanical forces in the nervous system play a corrective role
Mechanical forces in the nervous system play a corrective role
Team of researchers at Münster University show in the fruit fly how mechanical tearing cut neural connections Nerve cells communicate with one another via long processes known as axons and dendrites, or, more generally, neurites. During development, these processes first grow and form connections with other cells, for example synapses with other nerve cells.

Physics - Chemistry - 25.01.2023
The Last Mysteries of Mica
The Last Mysteries of Mica
A well-known mineral is once again the center of attention thanks to applications in electronics: the Vienna University of Technology shows that mica still has surprises in store. At first glance, mica is something quite ordinary: it is a common mineral, found in granite for example, and has been extensively studied from geological, chemical and technical perspectives.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.01.2023
Dengue and Zika Viruses: Towards a Better Understanding of the Mechanisms of Transmission
Aedes mosquitoes are the principal vectors of dengue and other arboviruses, including Zika, for which no vaccines or antiviral treatments currently exist. Understanding the factors that influence the transmission of arboviruses from mosquitoes to humans is therefore a priority because it could guide the implementation of public health measures that could limit or even prevent epidemics.

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.01.2023
What crocodile DNA reveals about the Ice Age
What crocodile DNA reveals about the Ice Age
Environmental drivers such as sea level affect genetic evolution and point to where conservation efforts may be focused What drives crocodile evolution? Is climate a major factor or changes in sea levels? Determined to find answers to these questions, researchers from McGill University discovered that while changing temperatures and rainfall had little impact on the crocodiles- gene flow over the past three million years, changes to sea levels during the Ice Age had a different effect.

Environment - 25.01.2023
How salmon feed flowers & flourishing ecosystems: study
How salmon feed flowers & flourishing ecosystems: study
Nutrients from salmon carcasses can substantively alter the growth and reproduction of plant species in the surrounding habitat, and even cause some flowers to grow bigger and more plentiful, SFU researchers have found. Their study, published today in the journal Royal Society Open Science , is the first to demonstrate a connection between salmon and coastal plant growth and reproduction.

Earth Sciences - 25.01.2023
Shark and ray populations rebounding in Northwestern Atlantic: SFU study
Shark and ray populations rebounding in Northwestern Atlantic: SFU study
Better fisheries management and conservation is effective at turning the tide on the shark and ray declines, according to a study from Simon Fraser researchers. The fact sharks and rays are increasingly threatened by overfishing has made global headlines in recent years. Oceanic populations have plummeted by as much as 71 per cent in the last 50 years and one third of all sharks and rays are threatened with extinction.

Environment - History / Archeology - 25.01.2023
8 billion and counting: will the Earth survive?
The good news is that global population growth has slowed and won't in itself cause climate change, says UdeM demographics professor Alain Gagnon. CONTENU - Credit: Photo de courtoisie In November, the United Nations announced that the Earth is now home to eight billion people, or seven billion more than there were just 200 years ago.

Health - 25.01.2023
Bacterium decreases effectiveness of immunotherapy
A new study finds that antibodies linked to Helicobacter pylori infections may be associated with lower overall survival outcomes in melanoma patients treated with immunotherapy. CONTENU - Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium that colonizes the stomach lining and is found in more than half of the global population, making it one of the most widespread bacterial infections in the world.

Physics - Life Sciences - 25.01.2023
Thermal motions and oscillation modes determine the uptake of bacteria in cells
Thermal motions and oscillation modes determine the uptake of bacteria in cells
Team at the University of Freiburg analyzes how model bacteria dock to and penetrate membrane bubbles. How and with what effort does a bacterium - or a virus - enter a cell and cause an infection? Researchers from Freiburg have now made an important contribution to answering this question: A team led by physicist Alexander Rohrbach and his collaborator Dr. Yareni Ayala was able to show how thermal fluctuations of a model bacterium and membrane oscillation modes of a model cell influence the energy with which the model bacteria dock and enter the membrane.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.01.2023
Research by the RVC explores link between parasitic infection and stunted growth in children
Analysis of current literature and research by the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) has revealed there are various pathways which connect parasitic infection to stunting. The findings suggest that human exposure to parasitic disease from conception through to two years of age may contribute to childhood stunting.

Environment - 25.01.2023
Study links nano and macro aspects of everyday force
Study links nano and macro aspects of everyday force
Science friction: Study links nano and macro aspects of everyday force The discoveries could improve the design of personal prosthetic devices as well as sustainable energy systems Without the force called friction, cars would skid off the roadway, humans couldn't stride down the sidewalk, and objects would tumble off your kitchen counter and onto the floor.

Computer Science - 25.01.2023
Skywing: Open-source software aids collaborative autonomy applications
Skywing: Open-source software aids collaborative autonomy applications
A new software developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and known as Skywing, provides domain scientists working to protect the nation's critical infrastructure with a high-reliability, real-time software platform for collaborative autonomy applications. The U.S. modern critical infrastructure - from the electrical grid that sends power to homes to the pipelines that deliver water and natural gas and the railways and roadways we travel - is full of digitized components.

Life Sciences - 24.01.2023
Polygamous birds have fewer harmful mutations
Polygamous birds have fewer harmful mutations
New study led by the Milner Centre for Evolution suggests polygamy increases the efficiency of natural selection by reducing harmful mutations. Bird species that breed with several sexual partners have fewer harmful mutations, according to a study led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 24.01.2023
Space collaboration including Sussex scientist makes icy discovery which sheds light on the building blocks of life
In a development believed to shed light on the building blocks of life, an international team of scientists, including Prof Wendy Brown from the University of Sussex, has discovered diverse ices in the darkest, coldest regions of space so-far measured, which are around 500 light years from Earth. The discovery within a molecular cloud was made by scientists from the IceAge project, an international consortium of academics using the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), to observe the building blocks of life.

Life Sciences - 24.01.2023
Stem cells help immature lungs on their way
Children born prematurely often have problems with their lungs. Can stem cells help repair their damaged lungs? Biologist Tim Wolfs is researching it with support from Longfonds (Lung Fund). The lungs of premature children are unfinished. In addition, the lungs often suffer additional damage. This can already happen during pregnancy, for example due to an infection in the amniotic fluid.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.01.2023
Genome Editing Procedures Optimised
Genome Editing Procedures Optimised
Heidelberg scientists succeed in boosting the efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9 and related methods and modifying initially inaccessible DNA sequences In the course of optimising key procedures of genome editing, researchers from the department of Developmental Biology / Physiology at the Centre for Organismal Studies of Heidelberg University have succeeded in substantially improving the efficiency of molecular genetic methods such as CRISPR/Cas9 and related systems, and in broadening their areas of application.

Physics - Chemistry - 24.01.2023
Scientists open new window on the physics of glass formation
Research from an international team of scientists has cast new light on the physics of vitrification - the process by which glass forms. Their findings, which centre on analysis of a common feature of glasses called the boson peak, could help pave the way for new developments in materials science. The peak can be observed in glass when special equipment is used to study the vibrations of its constituent atoms, where it spikes in the terahertz range.

Health - Psychology - 24.01.2023
Generational inequalities in mental health accelerated during Covid-19 pandemic
Generational inequalities in mental health accelerated during Covid-19 pandemic
Core symptoms of anxiety and depression were more common among younger generations compared to older age groups during the COVID-19 outbreak - with the gap between young and old widening further during the pandemic, according to a new study by UCL and King's College London. Published today in Psychological Medicine, the study explores data from 26,772 people living in the UK across five different birth cohort studies - following those born in 1946, 1958, 1970, 1989-90 and 2000-02.

Health - Career - 24.01.2023
Impact of high GP turnover on service and health
A new study by University of Manchester researchers has revealed the stark impact that high turnover of GPs has on patients' health outcomes and the service they receive in England. The analysis found that 'persistent high turnover', defined by the researchers as when more than 10% of GPs changed in a practice in at least 3 consecutive years - was not uncommon.