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Results 21 - 40 of 1847.


Health - Pharmacology - 28.06.2022
Highly Effective Memory B Cells Localized in the Lungs
How can we increase the efficacy of vaccines used to protect against viral respiratory diseases such as influenza and COVID-19? Scientists from Inserm, CNRS and Aix-Marseille Université at the Center of Immunology Marseille-Luminy are opening up new prospects in the field, with the triggering of memory B cells directly in the lungs looking to be a promising avenue.

Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Swarm vortex
Swarm vortex
Living in a collective offers fish many advantages - for example, more efficient locomotion Iain Couzin, a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Behavioral Biology in Constance, and his team want to know what rules fish follow in a school and what advantages life in a collective offers. State-of-the-art technology is helping the researchers to find order in the great confusion.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 28.06.2022
An Age-Old Story: Farmers against Pests
An Age-Old Story: Farmers against Pests
As early as the Neolithic period, pests posed a threat to agricultural yields, as shown by the remains of mice and insects found in prehistoric wells by a Basel-led archaeological research team. However, there are also indications that people knew how to defend against these pests - for example, by switching to less vulnerable kinds of grain.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded
Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded
Binge eating bye bye: Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded A group of researchers has found a completely new approach to treating eating disorders. The scientists have demonstrated that a group of nerve cells in the hypothalamus (known as AgRP, agouti-related peptide neurons) control the release of endogenous lysophospholipids, which in turn control the excitability of nerve cells in the cerebral cortex, stimulating food intake.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 28.06.2022
Association of children conceived via infertility treatments with school and mental health outcomes
Children conceived through medically assisted reproduction (MAR) fare better at school but are slightly more likely to have mental health problems by their late teens, finds a new study led by researchers at UCL and the University of Helsinki. The researchers say the correlation for mental health is  only  observed when the social demographics of children's families are taken into account, and that there is  no  evidence to suggest the MAR treatment itself is the source of association for mental health.

Economics / Business - Health - 28.06.2022
Messaging on healthy foods may not prompt healthier purchases: study
Messaging on healthy foods may not prompt healthier purchases: study
Healthy food cues standing alone don't prompt healthier buying decisions, but they may counter advertising for sugary and fatty foods, says study co-authored by Cambridge researchers. People making food-buying choices are often faced with adverts or other descriptions such as -low calorie- (healthy) or -tasty- (less healthy) to influence their decisions, so how effective are health-conscious nudges in moving consumer behaviour toward healthier lifestyles?

Health - Psychology - 28.06.2022
Racism and discrimination harm health
Long-term changes in the stress hormone cortisol can lead to disease Individuals with an immigrant background often face experiences of discrimination. Experiencing discrimination based on ethnic background is associated with stress and affects mental and physical health. A team led by psychologist Ricarda Nater-Mewes of the University of Vienna has now shown that the frequency of experiences of racism is related to physical stress indicators.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Maternal microbiome promotes healthy development of the baby
Maternal microbiome promotes healthy development of the baby
Researchers studying mice have found the first evidence of how a mother's gut microbes can help in the development of the placenta, and the healthy growth of the baby. This study, carried out in mice, identifies the maternal microbiome as a new player in the communication between mother, placenta and fetus.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Centenarians' offspring share their unique footprint
Centenarians’ offspring share their unique footprint
A genetic analysis of centenarians- descendants reveals a specific genetic footprint that may explain why they are less frail than descendants of non-centenarians of the same age. This is the main conclusion of a study led by the University of Valencia (UV), the CIBER for Fragility and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES), and the Health Research Institute (INCLIVA) that has been published in The Journals of Gerontology .

Mechanical Engineering - Research Management - 28.06.2022
New method based on smart materials for experimenting with cells
New method based on smart materials for experimenting with cells
Scientists from 4D-BIOMAP, an ERC research project at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), have developed a new experimental method, based on magneto-active polymers, to study cellular behaviour. These compounds, which consist of a polymeric matrix (e.g., an elastomer) containing magnetic particles (e.g., iron), mechanically react by changing their shape and stiffness.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.06.2022
Highly antibiotic-resistant strain of MRSA that arose in pigs can jump to humans
A new study has found that a highly antibiotic-resistant strain of the superbug MRSA - methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus - has emerged in livestock in the last 50 years, probably due to widespread antibiotic use in pig farming. Cases of livestock-associated MRSA in humans are still only a small fraction of all MRSA cases in human populations, but the fact that they-re increasing is a worrying sign.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Colonising sea urchins can withstand hot, acidic seas
Marine biologists have found that black sea urchins in the Mediterranean Sea are remarkably tolerant of warm, acidic water. As a colonising species, the urchins' adaptability could lead to an ecological disaster in our climate change-impacted seas. In bubbling vents off the coast of Ischia, a volcanic island in the Gulf of Naples, lives a curious population of black sea urchins.

Environment - Computer Science - 28.06.2022
Is AI good or bad for the climate? It's complicated
Is AI good or bad for the climate? It’s complicated
As the world fights climate change, will the increasingly widespread use of artificial intelligence (AI) be a help or a hindrance? In a paper published this week in Nature Climate Change , a team of experts in AI, climate change, and public policy present a framework for understanding the complex and multifaceted relationship of AI with greenhouse gas emissions, and suggest ways to better align AI with climate change goals.

Health - 28.06.2022
Innovative lung-imaging technique shows cause of long-COVID symptoms
By having study participants inhale polarized xenon gas while inside the MRI, the researchers see in real-time the function of the 300'500 million tiny alveolar sacs, which are responsible for delivering oxygen to the blood. (Supplied photo/Paulina Wyszkiewicz) Many who experience what is now called 'long-COVID' report feeling brain fog, breathless, fatigued and limited in doing everyday things, often lasting weeks and months post-infection.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 28.06.2022
A sanitizer in the galactic centre region
A sanitizer in the galactic centre region
Many of us have probably already - literally - handled the chemical compound iso-propanol: it can used as an antiseptic, a solvent or a cleaning agent. But this substance is not only found on Earth: researchers led by Arnaud Belloche from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn have now detected the molecule in interstellar space for the first time.

Environment - 28.06.2022
Simultaneous extreme weather created dangerous conditions in U.S
The dangerous extremes are expected to topple records as the effects of climate change continue to shift weather patterns Intense heat in the southwestern United States broke records last summer partly because it hit in tandem with an unusually severe drought, a new Johns Hopkins study shows. The study measured for the first time how the two extreme weather events dangerously interacted in real time.

Environment - Innovation - 27.06.2022
Biodiversity risks to persist well beyond future global temperature peak
Biodiversity risks to persist well beyond future global temperature peak
Even if global temperatures begin to decline after peaking this century because of climate change, the risks to biodiversity could persist for decades after, finds a new study by UCL and University of Cape Town researchers. The paper, published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences , models the potential impacts on global biodiversity if temperatures increase by more than 2°C compared to pre-industrial levels, before beginning to decline again.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.06.2022
Tracking down the causes of rare diseases in children
Tracking down the causes of rare diseases in children
The causes of intelligence impairment or epilepsy remain unexplained in more than 50 per cent of cases. Together with international colleagues, researchers at Leipzig University Hospital have discovered two genes with mutations that cause neurodevelopmental disorders in children. Their findings have now been published in scientific journals.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.06.2022
New Genetic Associations in Pediatric NAFLD Affect Both Risk and Severity
Paired studies in children further identify differences between pediatric and adult diseases and may inform future treatments in a chronic childhood disease In a pair of overlapping studies, a diverse team of researchers, led by scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, have deepened investigations into the genetic origins of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in children, describing multiple gene variants (including some previously unknown) that contribute to the risk of developing NAFLD and gene variants associated with the severity of the liver disease.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 27.06.2022
Calls for mental health of both parents to be considered during the perinatal period
Calls for mental health of both parents to be considered during the perinatal period
Perinatal mood disorders such as postnatal depression and perinatal anxiety, may affect both mothers and fathers simultaneously, finds a new systematic review and meta-analysis* led by UCL researchers. Around 3 in 100 couples (3.18%) were found to both suffer from late postnatal depression, which occurs three to 12 months after a child is born.