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Results 21 - 40 of 1840.


Life Sciences - Health - 10.05.2021
Feds back probe of understudied gut nervous system
Feds back probe of understudied gut nervous system
Uribe wins NIH grant to study enteric nervous system development Rice University neurobiologist Rosa Uribe will be hitting the books for her latest study of the digestive system, but some of the pages in her books are a billion years old. Uribe , an assistant professor of biosciences, has won a five-year, $2 million R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health to study how the enteric nervous system forms.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.05.2021
Parallel universes cross in Flatland
Parallel universes cross in Flatland
Physicists at the University of Bath observe modified energy landscapes at the intersection of 2D materials. Last updated on Monday 10 May 2021 In 1884, Edwin Abbott wrote the novel Flatland: A Romance in Many Dimensions as a satire of Victorian hierarchy. He imagined a world that existed only in two dimensions, where the beings are 2D geometric figures.

Computer Science - 10.05.2021
Overcoming Tab Overload
Carnegie Mellon University CMU researchers develop tool to better manage browser tabs If you are reading this, chances are you have several other tabs open in your browser that you mean to get to eventually. Internet browser tabs are a major source of friction on the internet. People love them. People hate them.

Health - 08.05.2021
Mild Covid-19 infection very unlikely to cause lasting heart damage
Mild Covid-19 infection is very unlikely to cause lasting damage to the structure or function of the heart, according to a study led by UCL researchers and funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and Barts Charity. The researchers say the results, published in JACC Cardiovascular Imaging, should reassure the public, as they relate to the vast majority of people who had Covid-19 infections with mild or no symptoms.

Environment - 07.05.2021
Sea level rises from melting ice massively reduced by limiting global warming
Sea level rises from melting ice massively reduced by limiting global warming
Sea level rise caused by melting ice could be halved this century if the Paris Agreement target of limiting warming to 1.5░C is met. A new study, from an international research team including University of Leeds scientists, explored the land ice contribution to sea level in the 21st century arising from the world’s glaciers and the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.05.2021
New way to reduce scarring
Researchers have been able to reduce scarring by blocking part of the healing process in research that could make a significant difference for burns and other trauma patients. University of Queensland Professor Kiarash Khosrotehrani said scars had been reduced by targeting the gene that instructs stem cells to form them in an animal study.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.05.2021
Bacterial DNA can be read either forwards or backwards - new study
Bacteria contain symmetry in their DNA signals that enable them to be read either forwards or backwards, according to new findings at the University of Birmingham which challenge existing knowledge about gene transcription. In all living organisms, DNA code is divided into sections which provide information about a specific process.

Health - Economics / Business - 07.05.2021
Regular virus tests can curb infection rates
Regular virus tests can curb infection rates
Since February 2021, the canton of Grisons is using saliva-based PCR mass testing within its mobile workforce as a potential means to contain the COVID-19 pandemic and reduce infection rates. Empa researchers are now leading the analysis of data from the first eight weeks of the testing regime. They observed a reduction in the incidence rate between 20 and 50%, depending on the business sector, and a noticeable reduction in the test positivity rate among those who were regularly tested.

Psychology - Pedagogy - 07.05.2021
Supporting mums' mental health strengthens 'protective' playmate role with children
Supporting mums’ mental health strengthens ’protective’ playmate role with children
Helping parents with depression or anxiety could also improve their ability to engage in potentially 'protective' forms of play with their children that can reduce the risk of behavioural problems, new research suggests. If there are two mothers who pretend play with the same frequency, but one has higher anxiety or depression level, the child of that parent will tend to engage in less pretend play Zhen Rao The finding comes from a granular analysis of 3,600 five-second clips, which researchers took from recordings of 60 mother-toddler pairs playing together.

Environment - Life Sciences - 07.05.2021
The African Wild Dog: An Ambassador for the World's Largest Nature Reserve
The African Wild Dog: An Ambassador for the World’s Largest Nature Reserve
The world's largest nature conservation area lies in southern Africa, comprising 520,000 square kilometers that span five countries. A study has now shown that the critically endangered African wild dog mostly remains within the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA) during its long periods of migration.

Life Sciences - 06.05.2021
Rooted tree key to understanding bacterial evolution
Rooted tree key to understanding bacterial evolution
The findings, published in the journal Science today , demonstrate how integrating vertical descent and horizontal gene transfer can be used to infer the root of the bacterial tree and the nature of the last bacterial common ancestor. Bacteria comprise a very diverse domain of single-celled organisms that can be found almost everywhere on Earth.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 06.05.2021
Flooding might triple in the mountains of Asia
Flooding might triple in the mountains of Asia
A team of Swiss and international climate scientists has shown that the risk of glacial lake outburst floods in the Himalayan region and the Tibetan plateau could triple in the coming decades. The "Third Pole" of the Earth, the high mountain ranges of Asia, bears the largest number of glaciers outside the polar regions.

Life Sciences - 06.05.2021
New study sheds light on the deep evolutionary origins of the human smile
New study sheds light on the deep evolutionary origins of the human smile
The origins of a pretty smile have long been sought in the fearsome jaws of living sharks which have been considered living fossils reflecting the ancestral condition for vertebrate tooth development and inference of its evolution. However, this view ignores real fossils which more accurately reflect the nature of ancient ancestors.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 06.05.2021
Animals laugh too, UCLA analysis suggests
Sifting through studies on various species' play behavior, researchers tracked vocalization patterns that show a strong similarity to human laughter Sifting through studies on various species' play behavior, researchers tracked vocalization patterns that show a strong similarity to human laughter Human laughter is common, but it's a somewhat mysterious part of our evolution.

Computer Science - 06.05.2021
University of Bath develops algorithm to improve aid response to victims in disaster zones
Research into disaster planning addresses issue of considering how to restore distribution networks alongside providing immediate aid Last updated on Thursday 6 May 2021 A University of Bath School of Management academic has developed an algorithm to help charities and aid organisations improve the way they help victims of storms, floods, earthquakes and other natural disasters.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 06.05.2021
Human burial from 78,000 years ago in Africa
Human burial from 78,000 years ago in Africa
└frica Pitarch, Beatriu de Pinˇs researcher in the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar of the UB (SERP-UB) 000 years ago. Researchers found remains of a child aged between 2.5 and 3, in a shallow grave in the site of Panga ya Saidi (Kenya). This burial joins other evidence of the first social complex behaviour seen in Homo Sapiens.

Earth Sciences - 06.05.2021
New indicator for oxygen levels in early oceans developed
New indicator for oxygen levels in early oceans developed
A geoscientific research team led by scientists from the University of Cologne has come a decisive step closer to determining the oxygen levels in the early Earth's history by analysing the composition of tungsten isotopes / publication in PNAS Oxygen is essential for the development of higher life.

Environment - Materials Science - 06.05.2021
Fungi could be building material of the future
Fungi could be building material of the future
Thursday, May 6, 2021 — For decades, we have been extracting materials from natural sources such as fossil fuels without considering the environmental impact.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.05.2021
Supernovae Twins Open Up New Possibilities for Precision Cosmology
Supernovae Twins Open Up New Possibilities for Precision Cosmology
By Bob Cahn Cosmologists have found a way to double the accuracy of measuring distances to supernova explosions - one of their tried-and-true tools for studying the mysterious dark energy that is making the universe expand faster and faster. The results from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) collaboration, led by Greg Aldering of the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), will enable scientists to study dark energy with greatly improved precision and accuracy, and provide a powerful crosscheck of the technique across vast distances and time.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.05.2021
Biomarker Detects Severe COVID-19 Early On
Severe cases of COVID-19 can now be detected at an early stage. Researchers at the University of Zurich have identified the first biomarker that can reliably predict which patients will develop severe symptoms. This can help to improve the treatment of severe cases of COVID-19. Most people who are infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop no or only mild symptoms.