news


Category

Years
2021 | 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008



Results 21 - 40 of 1833.


Environment - Life Sciences - 04.03.2021
Invasiveness facilitated by a large gene pool
Invasiveness facilitated by a large gene pool
In Lake Constance, sticklebacks are occupying increasingly varied habitat types - in recent years even including the open and deep waters of the lake. In an Eawag review undertaken as part of the "SeeWandel" project, these uniquely diverse ecological adaptations are explained in terms of renewed contact between three stickleback lineages - including one originating from the Baltic region, whose genetic material is as yet rarely observed in other Swiss lakes.

Campus - 04.03.2021
A mass exodus from California? Not exactly, says new Berkeley study
A mass exodus from California? Not exactly, says new Berkeley study
New research released today by the UC Berkeley California Policy Lab finds that, contrary to some news media reports suggesting a mass exodus from California, most moves in 2020 happened within the state.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.03.2021
How an "Antibiotic" Helps Bacteria Eat
For years, scientists have known that certain bacteria produce molecules that are toxic to other bacteria when there is competition for food and space. Now, Caltech researchers have discovered these so-called antibiotics have another purpose: they help the bacteria acquire essential nutrients when resources are scarce.

Environment - Campus - 04.03.2021
Will climate change outpace species adaptation?
Many species might be left vulnerable in the face of climate change, unable to adapt their physiologies to respond to rapid global warming. According to a team of international researchers, species evolve heat tolerance more slowly than cold tolerance, and the level of heat they can adapt to has limits.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.03.2021
Cancer ’guardian’ breaks bad with one switch
Study shows how mutant protein clusters drive disease-causing aggregates A mutation that replaces a single amino acid in a potent tumor-suppressing protein turns it from saint to sinister. A new study by a coalition of Texas institutions shows why that is more damaging than previously known. The ubiquitous  p53 protein  in its natural state, sometimes called "the  guardian of the genome ," is a front-line protector against cancer.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 04.03.2021
Can’t solve a riddle? The answer might lie in knowing what doesn’t work
Ever get stuck trying to solve a puzzle? Say, something like this: What goes in the last box? (The answer and more puzzles are below.) You look for a pattern, or a rule, and you just can't spot it. So you back up and start over. That's your brain recognizing that your current strategy isn't working, and that you need a new way to solve the problem, according to new research from the University of Washington.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science - 03.03.2021
Scientists confirm third-nearest star with a planet-and it’s rocky like Earth
In the past two decades, scientists have discovered more and more planets orbiting distant stars-but in some sense, they're still just dots on a map. "It's kind of like looking at a map of Europe and seeing the dot that's labeled 'Paris,'" said University of Chicago astrophysicist Jacob Bean. "You know where it is, but there's a whole lot that you're missing about the city." Scientists are developing new telescopes and instruments to fill in more and more of that picture.

Life Sciences - Environment - 03.03.2021
Attenborough series reveals University research into how animals see the world
Attenborough series reveals University research into how animals see the world
A wildlife series narrated by Sir David Attenborough is beaming research by several University of Bristol academics into living rooms around the world. Attenborough's Life in Colour is airing on the BBC and was produced by Bristol-based TV production company Humble Bee Films. Over the series, Sir David unearths how colour, and how creatures perceive that colour, dictates the undulations of the animal kingdom.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.03.2021
One dose of COVID-19 vaccines effective against hospitalisations in over 80s
Interim results presented here show the effectiveness of one dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines in preventing hospitalisation of people in their 80s with multiple comorbidities. The AvonCAP study results are reported for the first time today [3 March] by researchers from the University of Bristol, University Hospitals Bristol and Weston NHS Foundation Trust (UHBW) and North Bristol NHS Trust (NBT).

Social Sciences - Health - 03.03.2021
Green tea supplements modulate facial development of children with Down syndrome
Green tea supplements modulate facial development of children with Down syndrome
A new study led by Belgian and Spanish researchers published in Scientific Reports adds evidence about the potential benefits of green tea extracts in Down syndrome. The researchers observed that the intake of green tea extracts can reduce facial dysmorphology in children with Down syndrome when taken during the first three years of life.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.03.2021
Genomics study identifies routes of transmission of coronavirus in care homes
Genomics study identifies routes of transmission of coronavirus in care homes
Genomic surveillance - using information about genetic differences between virus samples - can help identify how SARS-CoV-2 spreads in care home settings, whose residents are at particular risk, according to new research published today. Older people, particularly those in care homes who may be frail, are at particular risk from COVID-19, so it's essential we do all that we can to protect them Estee Torok Care homes are at high risk of experiencing outbreaks of COVID-19, the disease caused by SARS-CoV-2.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 03.03.2021
New facility at University of Birmingham accelerates battery recycling research
Researchers working on the Faraday Institution ReLiB (Recycling and Reuse of Li-ion Batteries) project have completed the installation of new battery testing and storage facilities at the University of Birmingham. The new facilities will allow battery scientists and engineers to speed up their research to develop safe, economic and environmentally sound recycling routes that recover large volumes of valuable materials contained in batteries at the end of their first life.

Materials Science - Environment - 03.03.2021
Graphene filter makes carbon capture more efficient and cheaper
Graphene filter makes carbon capture more efficient and cheaper
Chemical engineers at EPFL have developed a graphene filter for carbon capture that surpasses the efficiency of commercial capture technologies, and can reduce the cost carbon capture down to $30 per ton of carbon dioxide. One of the main culprits of global warming is the vast amount of carbon dioxide pumped out into the atmosphere mostly from burning fossil fuels and the production of steel and cement.

Physics - Materials Science - 03.03.2021
A COSMIC Approach to Nanoscale Science
A COSMIC Approach to Nanoscale Science
Instrument at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials COSMIC, a multipurpose X-ray instrument at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (Berkeley Lab's) Advanced Light Source (ALS), has made headway in the scientific community since its launch less than 2 years ago, with groundbreaking contributions in fields ranging from batteries to biominerals.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.03.2021
OCTAVE to study vaccine responses in patients with impaired immune systems
A new UK study will seek to understand the immune response to COVID-19 vaccinations in patients with certain immunosuppressed conditions, including cancer. The OCTAVE trial, which is funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC), is a collaborative research project involving groups in the Universities of Glasgow, Birmingham, Oxford, Liverpool, Imperial College London and Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust.

Life Sciences - 03.03.2021
Cuttlefish show their intelligence by snubbing sub-standard snacks
Cuttlefish show their intelligence by snubbing sub-standard snacks
A study has found that cuttlefish can pass a fishy version of the 'marshmallow test' - and those that can delay gratification the longest are the most intelligent. It was quite astonishing that the cuttlefish could wait for over two minutes for a better snack. Why would a fast-growing animal with an average life-span of less than two years be a picky eater? Alex Schnell The results, published today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B , provide the first evidence of a link between self-control and intelligence in a non-primate species.

Life Sciences - 03.03.2021
Animals fake death for long periods to escape predators
Animals fake death for long periods to escape predators
Many animals feign death to try to escape their predators, with some individuals in prey species remaining motionless, if in danger, for extended lengths of time. Charles Darwin recorded a beetle that remained stationary for 23 minutes - however the University of Bristol has documented an individual antlion larvae pretending to be dead for an astonishing 61 minutes.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 03.03.2021
Cutting-edge analysis of prehistoric teeth sheds new light on the diets of lizards and snakes
Cutting-edge analysis of prehistoric teeth sheds new light on the diets of lizards and snakes
New research has revealed that the diets of early lizards and snakes, which lived alongside dinosaurs around 100 million years ago, were more varied and advanced than previously thought. The study, led by the University of Bristol and published in Royal Society ,showed lizards, snakes, and mosasaurs in the Cretaceous period already had the full spectrum of diet types, including flesh-eating and plant-based, which they have today.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.03.2021
New study launches into COVID-19 vaccine responses in patients with impaired immune systems
New study launches into COVID-19 vaccine responses in patients with impaired immune systems
A new UK study sponsored and run by the University of Birmingham has launched aiming to better understand the immune response to COVID-19 vaccinations in patients with certain immunosuppressed conditions including cancer. The OCTAVE trial, which is funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC), is a collaborative research project involving the Universities of Birmingham, Glasgow, Oxford, Liverpool, Imperial College London and Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust.

Physics - 03.03.2021
Water influences the stickiness of Hyaluronan
Water influences the stickiness of Hyaluronan
Hyaluronic acid, also known as hyaluronan, is a polysaccharide that helps establish the viscosity of bodily fluids. According to a new study by EPFL scientists, it also influences the behavior of far more water molecules than previously thought. Their findings - just published in Science Advances - open new avenues of research on the role water plays in the human body.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |