Life Sciences - Mar 25
Life Sciences
EPFL scientists have come up with a systematic method for studying and even predicting gene expression - without using cells. Using their innovative, quantitative approach, they measured important parameters governing gene regulation. This allowed them to design and construct a synthetic biological logic gate, which could one day be used to introduce new functions into cells.
Pedagogy - Mar 25
Pedagogy

Time-out as a method of discipline for toddlers and young children is a hot topic among parents and educators.

Computer Science - Mar 22

Organic electronics could allow companies to print electronics like paper or incorporate them into clothing to power wearable electronics-if there were only better ways to control their electronic structure.

Architecture - Mar 22
Architecture

New insight into termites' architectural strategies could help us design more energy efficient self-sustaining buildings for humans.

Earth Sciences - Mar 22

New research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and co-authored by the University of Bristol reveals that sharp variations of the surface of volcanoes can affect data collected by monitoring equipment.


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Life Sciences - 25.03.2019
Engineering cellular function without living cells
Engineering cellular function without living cells
EPFL scientists have come up with a systematic method for studying and even predicting gene expression - without using cells. Using their innovative, quantitative approach, they measured important parameters governing gene regulation. This allowed them to design and construct a synthetic biological logic gate, which could one day be used to introduce new functions into cells.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 25.03.2019
Is time-out damaging your child?
Is time-out damaging your child?
Time-out as a method of discipline for toddlers and young children is a hot topic among parents and educators. Is it harmful? Does it damage the attachment bond between parent and child? New research says no. It is still one of the most effective discipline strategies. Research from the University of Sydney has found that the correct use of 'time-out' as a form of discipline does not harm a child's mental health, but rather increases well-being and happiness.

Architecture - Environment - 22.03.2019
X-rays reveal secrets of termites' self-cooling, self-draining skyscrapers
X-rays reveal secrets of termites’ self-cooling, self-draining skyscrapers
New insight into termites' architectural strategies could help us design more energy efficient self-sustaining buildings for humans. Many species of termite, whose societies are built on hierarchies of kings, queens, workers, and soldiers, live in towering nests that are ventilated by a complex system of tunnels.

Computer Science / Telecom - Physics - 22.03.2019
Machine learning could help scientists invent flexible electronics
Organic electronics could allow companies to print electronics like paper or incorporate them into clothing to power wearable electronics-if there were only better ways to control their electronic structure. To help address this challenge, Nick Jackson, a postdoctoral fellow in the University of Chicago's Institute for Molecular Engineering , developed a faster way of creating molecular models by using machine learning.

Earth Sciences - 22.03.2019
Volcano cliffs can affect monitoring data
New research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and co-authored by the University of Bristol reveals that sharp variations of the surface of volcanoes can affect data collected by monitoring equipment. The surfaces of many volcanoes feature steep walls or cliffs. These are often part of calderas - large craters left by a previous collapse - but can also be caused by the volcano ‘rifting' - or splitting - or sector collapse, when part of the side of the volcano slides away.

Environment - 22.03.2019
Are 'natural' fibres really better for the environment than microplastic fibres’ A new study questions the impact of this plastic alternative
Are 'natural' fibres really better for the environment than microplastic fibres' A new study questions the impact of this plastic alternative Researchers from the University of Nottingham have found a much higher percentage of ‘natural' fibres than microplastic fibres in freshwater and atmospheric samples in the UK.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 22.03.2019
How new ketamine drug helps with depression
On March 5, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first truly new medication for major depression in decades. The drug is a nasal spray called esketamine, derived from ketamine-an anesthetic that has made waves for its surprising antidepressant effect.   Because treatment with esketamine might be so helpful to patients with treatment-resistant depression (meaning standard treatments had not helped them), the FDA expedited the approval process to make it more quickly available.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.03.2019
Mouse Study Yields Long-Awaited Insights into Human Stomach Cancer
A new breed of lab mouse could finally provide an animal model for stomach cancer research - and one potential treatment target has already been revealed Research Scientist Antoine Snijders (right) and postdoc Pin Wang analyze mouse blood samples. (Credit: Marilyn Chung/Berkeley Lab) Mice have been instrumental in the study of cancer, but like all animal models of human diseases, they have their limitations.

Life Sciences - 22.03.2019
Sound the alarm! How injured plant cells warn their neighbors
Sound the alarm! How injured plant cells warn their neighbors
All organisms can be injured. But what happens when a plant is injured? How can it heal itself and avoid infections' An international research team from the University of Basel and Ghent University has reported on wound reaction mechanisms in plants . Their insights into plant immune systems could be used for new approaches to sustainable crop production.

Chemistry - Pharmacology - 22.03.2019
Inert Nitrogen Forced to React with Itself
Inert Nitrogen Forced to React with Itself
03/22/2019 Direct coupling of two molecules of nitrogen: chemists from Würzburg and Frankfurt have achieved what was thought to be impossible. This new reaction is reported and opens new possibilities for one of the most inert molecules on earth. Constituting over 78 % of the air we breathe, nitrogen is the element found the most often in its pure form on earth.

Earth Sciences - 22.03.2019
How fluid viscosity affects earthquake intensity
How fluid viscosity affects earthquake intensity
A young researcher at EPFL has demonstrated that the viscosity of fluids present in faults has a direct effect on the force of earthquakes. Fault zones play a key role in shaping the deformation of the Earth's crust. All of these zones contain fluids, which heavily influence how earthquakes propagate.

Life Sciences - 21.03.2019
Half a billion-year-old fossil reveals the origins of comb jellies
Half a billion-year-old fossil reveals the origins of comb jellies
One of the ocean's little known carnivores has been allocated a new place in the evolutionary tree of life after scientists discovered its unmistakable resemblance with other sea-floor dwelling creatures. Comb jellies occupy a pivotal place in the history of animal evolution with some arguing that they were among the first animals to evolve.

Health - 21.03.2019
Breast ultrasound and cancer detection increased under new laws
State breast density notification laws that mandate reporting of mammogram results can prompt further screening and modestly boost cancer detection rates, say researchers at Yale's School of Public Health and School of Medicine. Their study was published in the American Journal of Public Health (PDF) .

Life Sciences - Health - 21.03.2019
Memory like a Sieve - Or Not
Study by Research Team at Freie Universität Led by Biology Professor Stephan Sigrist on Conditions for Improving Memory Formation in Aging Humans No 063/2019 from Mar 21, 2019 Humans are not only capable of forming memories but also recalling these memories years later. However, with advancing age many of us face difficulties with forming new memories, a process usually referred to as age-induced memory impairment.

Astronomy / Space Science - 21.03.2019
Testing the value of artificial gravity for astronaut health
Testing the value of artificial gravity for astronaut health
Test subjects in Cologne, Germany will take to their beds for 60 days from 25 March as part of a groundbreaking study, funded by European Space Agency ESA and US space agency NASA, into how artificial gravity could help astronauts stay healthy in space. Carried out at the German Aerospace Center's (DLR) :envihab facility, the long-term bedrest study is the first of its kind to be conducted in partnership between the two agencies.

Health - 21.03.2019
Further evidence of the dangers of smoking in pregnancy
‌‌Smoking during pregnancy is understood to pose risks to both baby and mother. Now, new research led by the University of Glasgow has found further evidence that maternal smoking poses a risk to baby and child health. The study, published today in BMJ Open , reveals more detailed evidence about the association between maternal smoking in pregnancy and childhood hospitalization, as well as birth conditions which can lead to lifelong ill health and devastating outcomes such as meningitis and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Computer Science / Telecom - 21.03.2019
Land-cover dynamics unveiled
Land-cover dynamics unveiled
Billions of image pixels recorded by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission have been used to generate a high-resolution map of land-cover dynamics across Earth's landmasses. This map also depicts the month of the peak of vegetation and gives new insight into land productivity. Using three years' worth of optical data, the map can indicate the time of vegetation peak and variability of vegetation across seasons.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 21.03.2019
What can machine learning tell us about the solid Earth?
What can machine learning tell us about the solid Earth?
Scientists are training machine learning algorithms to help shed light on earthquake hazards, volcanic eruptions, groundwater flow and longstanding mysteries about what goes on beneath the Earth's surface. Scientists seeking to understand Earth's inner clockwork have deployed armies of sensors listening for signs of slips, rumbles, exhales and other disturbances emanating from the planet's deepest faults to its tallest volcanoes.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.03.2019
New class of membranes shown to regenerate tissue and bone, viable solution for periodontitis
New class of membranes shown to regenerate tissue and bone, viable solution for periodontitis
Periodontitis affects nearly half of Americans ages 30 and older, and in its advanced stages, it could lead to early tooth loss or worse. Recent studies have shown that periodontitis could also increase risk of heart disease and Alzheimer's disease. A team of UCLA researchers has developed methods that may lead to more effective and reliable therapy for periodontal disease — ones that promote gum tissue and bone regeneration with biological and mechanical features that can be adjusted based on treatment needs.

Psychology - 21.03.2019
Levels of autism in China similar to the West, joint Chinese-UK study shows
Levels of autism in China similar to the West, joint Chinese-UK study shows
Contrary to previous studies, we have shown that the prevalence of autism spectrum conditions in China is in line with that found in the West Dr Sophia Xiang Sun Sign up to receive our weekly research email Our selection of the week's biggest research news and features direct to your inbox from the University of Cambridge.
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