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Life Sciences - Chemistry - 23.02.2009
The brain's reserve cells can be activated after stroke
The brain's reserve cells can be activated after stroke
Scientists at Karolinska Institutet have found a way of activating the neuronal reserves in the brains of mice by switching off the signal that inhibits the formation of new nerve cells. The study is presented in the online edition of the scientific. "So far, this is just basic research of no immediate practical significance, but the results are very exciting nonetheless," says Professor Jonas Frisén at the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, who led the study.

Life Sciences - 20.02.2009
Darwins Ansatz weiterentwickelt
Embryologie und Paläontologie existierten bereits zu Darwins Zeiten. Der Zoologe und Paläobiologe Marcelo Sánchez hat die beiden Disziplinen verbunden und erforscht so die Evolution von Landwirbeltieren.

Physics - 10.02.2009
Research highlights potential for improved solar cells
Research highlights potential for improved solar cells
Research has shown that carrier multiplication is a real phenomenon in tiny semiconductor crystals and not a false observation born of extraneous effects that mimic carrier multiplication.

Health - History / Archeology - 10.02.2009
Postnatal psychosis more common in older first-time mothers
Women who give birth for the first time after the age of 35 run a greater risk than younger first-time mothers of suffering a psychosis in the months after delivery. This according to a study from Karolinska Institutet published in the latest issue of the open access scientific periodical PLoS Medicine.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.02.2009
Link between vitamin D and genes in multiple sclerosis
Researchers have found evidence that a direct interaction between vitamin D and a common genetic variant alters the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). The Oxford University-led research, published in PLoS Genetics, suggests that vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy and the early years may increase the risk of offspring developing MS later in life.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 09.02.2009
Diverse ’Connectomes’ Hint at Genes’ Limits in the Nervous System
Cambridge, Mass. February 9, 2009 - Genetics may play a surprisingly small role in determining the precise wiring of the mammalian nervous system, according to painstaking mapping of every neuron projecting to a small muscle mice use to move their ears. These first-ever mammalian "connectomes," or complete neural circuit diagrams, reveal that neural wiring can vary widely even in paired tissues on the left and right sides of the same animal.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.02.2009
Cognitive training can alter the biochemistry of the brain
Researchers at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet have shown for the first time that the active training of the working memory brings about visible changes in the number of dopamine receptors in the human brain. The study was conducted with the help of PET scanning and provides deeper insight into the complex interplay between cognition and the brain's biological structure.

Physics - Health - 05.02.2009
A Better Mesh: Researchers ’Tighten’ Body’s Protective Coating
Office of News and Information Johns Hopkins University 901 South Bond Street, Suite 540 Baltimore, Maryland 21231 Phone: 443-287-9960 | Fax: 443-287-9920 A net with large holes won't catch small fish. Likewise, the microscopic fibers in the protective mucus coatings of the eyes, lungs, stomach or reproductive system naturally bundle together and allow the tiniest disease-causing bugs, allergens or pollutants to slip by.

Environment - Life Sciences - 05.02.2009
Predicting diversity within hotspots to enhance conservation
Predicting diversity within hotspots to enhance conservation
The 34 hotspots identified by Conservation International cover 2.3 percent of the Earth's land surface, yet more than 50 percent of the world's plant species and 42 percent of all terrestrial vertebrate species are endemic to these areas. All are threatened by human activities. BERKELEY — With limited funding and an inadequate number of scientists, governments in countries containing "hotspots" of threatened biodiversity are wrestling with how to protect plants and animals in disappearing habitats.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 04.02.2009
Volunteers needed to test weighty matters
Scientists from the University of Birmingham's medical school are looking for volunteers to take part in major study investigating the underlying causes of obesity and diabetes. The study will look at the specific role naturally occurring enzymes in the liver may play in raising the risk of developing obesity or Type 2 Diabetes.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 03.02.2009
Who cares about the fourth dimension?
Viennese scientists are trying to understand the mysteries of the holographic principle: How many dimensions are there in our universe? Some of the brightest minds of the world are doing research work in this sector - and still have not succeeded so far: Creating a unified theory of quantum gravitation is often considered to be the "Holy Grail" of modern science.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 03.02.2009
Who cares about the fourth dimension?
Viennese scientists are trying to understand the mysteries of the holographic principle: How many dimensions are there in our universe? Some of the brightest minds of the world are doing research work in this sector - and still have not succeeded so far: Creating a unified theory of quantum gravitation is often considered to be the ‘Holy Grail' of modern science.

Health - 02.02.2009
Road traffic noise in residential areas can increase the risk of heart attack
People living in environments with high levels of road traffic noise might be more likely to suffer myocardial infarction than people in quieter areas. This according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet carried out in the Stockholm area. The study compared 1,571 people from Stockholm County who had suffered a myocardial infarction between 1992 and 1994 with controls from the same area.

Life Sciences - 30.01.2009
Simple genetic mechanism may be behind the origin of species
Simple genetic mechanism may be behind the origin of species
PA 23/09 Some of the secrets behind the emergence of new species have been uncovered in a genetic study, conducted in collaboration with bioscientists at The University of Nottingham. Almost all plant species are known to have cross-breeds that sometimes produce infertile offspring. Now for the first time the team, led by the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, INRA-Versailles, has identified a simple genetic mechanism that may explain why this happens.

Life Sciences - 28.01.2009
Missing genes link to psoriasis
Missing genes link to psoriasis
PA 18/09 Genetics experts at The University of Nottingham have been involved in a scientific breakthrough which is helping to explain why some people may be more likely to suffer from the chronic skin condition, psoriasis. The research, which has just been published , shows that people who lack the genes LCE3B and LCE3C are more likely to be affected by psoriasis.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.01.2009
The Genes in Your Congeniality: Researchers Identify Genetic Influence in Social Networks
Cambridge, Mass. and San Diego, Calif. January 26, 2009 - Can't help being the life of the party? Maybe you were just born that way. Researchers from Harvard University and the University of California, San Diego have found that our place in a social network is influenced in part by our genes, according to new findings published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Health - Chemistry - 24.01.2009
Chemical commonly used in rubber product manufacture may cause cancer
A chemical, commonly used in the manufacture of rubber products, may cause cancer in workers regularly exposed to it, according to research published today ahead of print in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The researchers from the University of Birmingham's Institute of Occupational and Environmental Medicine found higher than expected rates of diagnosis and death from a number of cancers, amongst men working at a rubber plant in North Wales.

Environment - Physics - 21.01.2009
Summer peak, winter low temperatures now arrive 2 days earlier
BERKELEY — Not only has the average global temperature increased in the past 50 years, but the hottest day of the year has shifted nearly two days earlier, according to a new study by scientists from the University of California, Berkeley, and Harvard University. The average distribution of global temperatures for July and February.

Health - 20.01.2009
Outgoing and relaxed people less likely to develop dementia
People who are active, outgoing and relaxed may be less likely to develop dementia, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet. The results, published in the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, are based on questionnaires about life style and personality, as well as medical examination follow ups during a six year period.

Social Sciences - Health - 19.01.2009
Oxytocin improves human ability to recognize faces
Oxytocin, a hormone involved in child-birth and breast-feeding, helps people recognize familiar faces.
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