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Results 41 - 60 of 1431.


Health - 14.12.2010
Life and death (and sex and sewage) in a Roman town
Life and death (and sex and sewage) in a Roman town
Forget your preconceptions about the civilised, sparkling, white cityscapes of the ancient world: Real-life Pompeii was an altogether more sordid proposition, as Cambridge classicist Mary Beard is set to explain. In an hour-long documentary on BBC Two tonight, Professor Beard will draw on some of the latest finds, as well as her own experience researching Pompeii and Ancient Rome, to uncover little-known facts and bust some long-standing myths about the most famous excavation site in the western world.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
Scientists identify how virus triggers cervical and mouth cancer
Scientists identify how virus triggers cervical and mouth cancer
University of Manchester scientists have discovered for the first time an important new way in which the human papilloma virus (HPV) triggers cancer in what could lead to new treatments for cervical and mouth cancer. HPV infection is known to increase the risk of developing cancers of the cervix and mouth with the two high-risk forms of the virus accounting for approximately 70% of all cervical cancer cases.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
University scientists expose health risks of not responding to stress
Anticipating a hectic Christmas? As the festive season gathers momentum, ageing and immunity experts at the University of Birmingham are exposing the health risks of not responding to stressful situations. Their latest research has found that people who react the least to stress could be at greater risk of conditions such as depression and obesity, and have lowered immunity to infection.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
Sipping green tea regularly can alter how we perceive flavor
Sipping green tea regularly can alter how we perceive flavor
While trying to figure out what makes certain beverages cloudy, Cornell researchers made the startling discovery that certain chemicals in green tea - and perhaps red wine - react with saliva in ways that can alter how we perceive flavors. Specifically, regular consumption of the polyphenol-rich drinks can boost astringent sensations and our sensitivity to acids, reports Karl Siebert, professor of food science, in an article published online in Food Quality and Preference Sept.

Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
What happens when we feed birds?
What happens when we feed birds?
Great tit males that are fed start singing later in the morning. This changes their territorial behavior - which could have implications for their reproductive success.

Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
No Phenylketonuria in the Moss Physcomitrella patens
International Team Discovers New Metabolic Pathway Freiburg, 14. Phenylketonuria is the most common metabolic disease in humans. It occurs when the so-called PAH gene is defective, thus preventing the amino acid phenylalanine from being metabolized to the amino acid tyrosine. This leads to an accumulation of phenylalanine and to severe developmental disorders.

Physics - 14.12.2010
Qatar-Led International Team Finds Their First Alien World
Qatar-Led International Team Finds Their First Alien World
Cambridge, MA - In an exciting example of international collaboration, a Qatar astronomer teamed with scientists at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) and other institutions to discover a new alien world. This "hot Jupiter," now named Qatar-1b, adds to the growing list of alien planets orbiting distant stars.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.12.2010
Metabolism Models may Explain Why Alzheimer’s Disease Kills Some Neuron Types First
Palsson Lab: Systems Biology Research Group Nature Biotechnology Bioengineering at UC San Diego Publications from the Palsson Lab Jacobs School of Engineering on Twitter Jacobs School of Engineering blog Nathan Lewis, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Bioengineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering and the first author on the Nature Biotechnology paper.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
Unique case study on Alzheimer's disease
Unique case study on Alzheimer's disease
A case study from the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet sheds light on the pathological course of Alzheimer's disease. The brain of the first Alzheimer's patient to display amyloids demonstrable with a PET scanner has been studied both during progression of the disease and after death.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2010
Fighter pilots' brains are more sensitive?
Fighter pilots’ brains are more sensitive?
Links: Journal of Neuroscience MRC Wellcome Trust Professor Masud Husain Cognitive tests and MRI scans have shown significant differences in the brains of fighter pilots when compared to a control group, according to a new study led by scientists from UCL. The study, published today in the Journal of Neuroscience , compares the cognitive performance of 11 front-line RAF (Royal Air Force) Tornado fighter pilots to a control group of a similar IQ with no previous experience of piloting aircraft.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.12.2010
Leukaemia stem cell discovery
Leukaemia stem cell discovery
Researchers at King's College London have discovered that leukaemic stem cells can be reversed to a pre-leukaemic stage by suppressing a protein called beta-catenin found in the blood. They also found that advanced leukaemic stem cells that had become resistant to treatment could be 're-sensitised' to treatment by suppressing the same protein.

Health - 13.12.2010
Screening can pick up early signs of womb cancer
In a paper published today in Lancet Oncology , scientists in the Gynaecological Cancer Research Centre at UCL have demonstrated that an ultrasound scan being used in screening trials for ovarian cancer can also pick up  signs of endometrial cancer before any symptoms occur. This is the first large scale study of screening for endometrial (womb) cancer, which is increasing in incidence and is responsible for over 1,700 deaths per year in the UK.

Health - Economics - 13.12.2010
New research centre will bridge the gap between academia and health policy
New research centre will bridge the gap between academia and health policy
New research centre will bridge the gap between academia and health policy The Centre for Health Policy, which aims to turn high quality research into evidence-based policy innovations, has been launched at Imperial College London. Monday 13 December 2010 A new centre that aims to turn high quality research into evidence-based policy innovations has been launched at Imperial College London today.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.12.2010
Two genes linked to common gynaecological disease
Two genes linked to common gynaecological disease
Science | Health 13 Dec 10 Two genetic variants have been identified that increase the risk of developing endometriosis, a common gynaecological disease. The study provides clues to the origin of this often very painful condition, which has a significant impact on the quality of life of many women. The research was carried out at the University of Oxford, the Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Australia, and Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in the USA.

Physics - Electroengineering - 13.12.2010
In the future: processing and memory on a single chip
In the future: processing and memory on a single chip
Researchers have shown that a magnetically polarised current can be manipulated by electric fields. This important discovery opens up the prospect of simultaneously processing and storing data on electrons held in the molecular structure of computer chips - combining computer memory and processing power on the same chip.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 10.12.2010
Genome of barley disease reveals surprises
Genome of barley disease reveals surprises
Genome of barley disease reveals surprises Scientists have sequenced the genome of a major fungal disease that affects barley and other cereal crops Scientists have sequenced the genome of a major fungal disease that affects barley and other cereal crops, a breakthrough that could lead to significant advances in our understanding of how plant diseases evolve.

Health - 10.12.2010
Starfish inspire inflammation research
Starfish inspire inflammation research
Scientists at King's are working on creating versions of starfish compounds in the search for treatments for inflammatory conditions such as asthma, hay fever and arthritis. Most man-made objects placed in sea water become covered with marine life, but starfish manage to keep their surface clear. This non-stick property is particularly interesting to King's scientists working on finding new ways to treat inflammation in humans.

Earth Sciences - Economics - 10.12.2010
Iron legacy leaves soil high in manganese
Iron legacy leaves soil high in manganese
Iron furnaces that once dotted central Pennsylvania may have left a legacy of manganese enriched soils, according to Penn State geoscientists. This manganese can be toxic to trees, especially sugar maples, and other vegetation. The research, which quantified the amounts of manganese in soil core samples, was part of work done at the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory, located in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania.

Health - 10.12.2010
Trial shows new drug does not improve survival rates in breast cancer patients
Trial shows new drug does not improve survival rates in breast cancer patients The results of a long awaited trial aiming to find new treatments for breast cancer, has concluded that Zoledronic acid does not improve disease-free survival among patients. The AZURE* trial, which was led by Professor Rob Coleman from the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Teaching Hospitals and coordinated by the Clinical Trials Research Unit (CTRU) at the University of Leeds, tested patients with stage II/III breast cancer.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 10.12.2010
Scientists give insight into 200-year-old riddle
Scientists give insight into 200-year-old riddle
University of Manchester researchers have played a vital role in an international study that has revived the 200-year-old question: why do different species share similar stages of embryonic development? Dr Casey Bergman and Dr Dave Gerrard at Manchester's Faculty of Life Sciences collaborated on the project with Pavel Tomancak, at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, and Uwe Ohler, at Duke University, on a study funded by the Human Frontiers of Science Program published in Nature today.