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Results 61 - 80 of 1431.


Physics - 10.12.2010
’Black hole of evidence’ for motorcycle rider training
A review by experts from Sydney-based The George Institute for Global Health has revealed a startling lack of evidence of whether pre- and post-licence training is effective in reducing death and serious injury for motorcycle riders. Researchers from The George Institute analysed over 23 studies conducted from 1975 to the present day publishing their findings in The Cochrane Library .

Physics - 09.12.2010
Vibrating nanorods measure thin films for microcircuits
Vibrating nanorods measure thin films for microcircuits
A key step in many nanofabrication processes is to create thin films, sometimes only one molecule thick, by a method known as atomic layer deposition. Researchers at Cornell and Tel Aviv University have developed a new tool for nanofabricators to test the physical properties of such films. Ultrathin films are increasingly important in constructing microcircuits.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 09.12.2010
Project will monitor tremor activity beneath San Andreas Fault
BERKELEY — The Berkeley Seismological Laboratory will begin early next year to install earthquake detectors on the southern San Andreas Fault near the town of Cholame to study mysterious tremors discovered beneath the area. Tremors from deep underground have been detected in the area of Cholame, 32 kilometers southeast of Parkfield.

Physics - 09.12.2010
Black holes and warped space: New UK telescope shows off first images
Black holes and warped space: New UK telescope shows off first images
This dramatic image is the first to be produced by e-MERLIN, a powerful new array of radio telescopes linked across the UK. Spearheaded by the University of Manchester's Jodrell Bank Observatory and funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council, the e-MERLIN telescope will allow astronomers to address key questions relating to the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars and planets.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.12.2010
Key protein that allows nerve cells to repair themselves discovered
Key protein that allows nerve cells to repair themselves discovered
A team of scientists led by Melissa Rolls, an assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State University, has peered inside neurons to discover an unexpected process that is required for regeneration after severe neuron injury. The process was discovered during Rolls's studies aimed at deciphering the inner workings of dendrites - the part of the neuron that receives information from other cells and from the outside world.

Life Sciences - 08.12.2010
Done over by the dunnart - human vision bettered
Done over by the dunnart - human vision bettered
Humans are not the only mammal to have good colour vision, according to scientists - in fact, another mammal may be seeing things beyond our own capacity. The research, led by Dr Wiebke Ebeling of the ANU Research School of Biology - now based at the Centre for Marine Science at the University of Tasmania - has revealed that Australian marsupials have more diversity in their colour vision than scientists expected and are far from being 'colour-blind' as expected in other mammals.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science - 08.12.2010
Redrawing the map of Great Britain based on human interaction
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. A group of researchers at MIT, Cornell University and University College London have used one of the world's largest databases of telecommunications records to redraw the map of Great Britain. The research, which will be published in the journal PLoS ONE on Dec. 8, is based on the analysis of 12 billion anonymized records representing more than 95 percent of Great Britain's residential and business landlines.

Computer Science - Mathematics - 08.12.2010
Geotagging reveals not only where you are, but also people you might know
Geotagging reveals not only where you are, but also people you might know
If you see Fred and Susie standing in the same line at the cafeteria just once, it probably doesn't mean anything. If they show up together in many different places, it starts to mean a lot. But how many times do you have to see them together before it becomes significant? Surprisingly few, say Cornell computer scientists.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.12.2010
Scientists discover brain's inherent ability to focus learning
Scientists discover brain’s inherent ability to focus learning
Medical researchers have found a missing link that explains the interaction between brain state and the neural triggers responsible for learning, potentially opening up new ways of boosting cognitive function in the face of diseases such as Alzheimer's as well as enhancing memory in healthy people. Much is known about the neural processes that occur during learning but until now it has not been clear why it occurs during certain brain states but not others.

Health - 08.12.2010
MS may be reversed, study suggests
could be reversed using stem cells that repair injury in the central nervous system, a study shows. Researchers have identified a mechanism essential for regenerating insulating layers, known as myelin sheaths, that protect nerve fibres in the brain. In additional studies in rodents, the team from Edinburgh and Cambridge showed how this mechanism can be exploited.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 08.12.2010
NASA's Spitzer Reveals First Carbon-Rich Planet
NASA’s Spitzer Reveals First Carbon-Rich Planet
PASADENA, Calif. Astronomers have discovered that a huge, searing-hot planet orbiting another star is loaded with an unusual amount of carbon. The planet, a gas giant named WASP-12b, is the first carbon-rich world ever observed. The discovery was made using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, along with previously published ground-based observations.

Life Sciences - 08.12.2010
University research aims to solve major questions in reproductive biology
University research aims to solve major questions in reproductive biology
University research aims to solve major questions in reproductive biology An expert at the University of Sheffield is set to investigate whether all sperm males produce are equally likely to fertilise, as part of a 1.7million research project that could lead to improvements in assisted reproductive technology in humans.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 08.12.2010
Astronomers detect first carbon-rich exoplanet
Artist concept of the extremely hot exoplanet WASP-12b and the host star. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC) To receive a high-resolution image, please e-mail whitney.b.clavin [a] jpl.nasa (p) gov CAMBRIDGE, Mass. A team led by a former postdoctoral researcher in MIT's Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences and the MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics, recently measured the first-ever planetary atmosphere that is substantially enriched in carbon.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.12.2010
See off Alzheimer's with the colour purple
See off Alzheimer’s with the colour purple
Eating purple fruits such as blueberries and drinking green tea can help ward off diseases including Alzheimer's, Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson's, a University of Manchester report claims. Ground-breaking research from Professor Douglas Kell, published in the journal Archives of Toxicology, has found that the majority of debilitating illnesses are in part caused by poorly-bound iron which causes the production of dangerous toxins that can react with the components of living systems.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.12.2010
Our brains are wired so we can better hear ourselves speak, new study shows
BERKELEY — Like the mute button on the TV remote control, our brains filter out unwanted noise so we can focus on what we're listening to. But when it comes to following our own speech, a new brain study from the University of California, Berkeley, shows that instead of one homogenous mute button, we have a network of volume settings that can selectively silence and amplify the sounds we make and hear.

Life Sciences - 08.12.2010
Scientists discover new way of seeing
University of Manchester scientists have found that a new type of light sensitive cell in the eye helps the brain measure brightness. This mechanism, which works alongside the rod and cone cells in the eyes, may be particularly important to people with some sorts of blindness. Professor Rob Lucas and Dr Tim Brown, whose work is oublished in PLoS Biology today, hope their findings will lead to a new understanding of how we perceive the world, and may eventually even lead to technical applications in artificial lighting, visual display unit and television screen design.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.12.2010
Secondhand smoke increases risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children
Secondhand smoke increases risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children
Secondhand smoke increases risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children Children exposed to secondhand smoke are more likely to get invasive meningococcal disease than children who are not exposed, according to a metaanalysis published in PLoS Medicine - News Tuesday 7 December 2010 Children exposed to secondhand smoke are more likely to get invasive meningococcal disease than children who are not exposed, according to a metaanalysis published today in the journal PLoS Medicine.

Physics - Chemistry - 07.12.2010
New Observations of Exploding Stars Reveal Pauses, Flickers and Flares not Reliably Seen Before
Astronomers have traced the waxing and waning light of exploding stars more closely than ever before and seen patterns that aren't yet accounted for in our current understanding of how these eruptions occur. A team led by Bernard Jackson, a solar physicist at the Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences at the University of California, San Diego, developed the instrument that allowed the team to make such precise measurements.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.12.2010
Living in certain neighborhoods increases the chances older men and women will develop cancer
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Older people who live in racially segregated neighborhoods with high crime rates have a much higher chance of developing cancer than do older people with similar health histories and income levels who live in safer, less segregated neighborhoods. That is one of the key findings of a new study forthcoming in the January 2011 issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

Physics - 07.12.2010
Sneak Attacks from the Sun
Sneak Attacks from the Sun
Cambridge, MA - Our Sun can be a menace when it sends out powerful solar blasts of radiation towards the Earth. Astronomers keenly watch the Sun to learn more about what powers these solar eruptions, in hopes of being able to predict them. New research shows that one-third of the Sun's blasts are "sneak attacks" that may occur without warning.