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Agronomy / Food Science - 15.12.2010
Eating at screen can lead to later snack attacks?
Eating at screen can lead to later snack attacks?
Press release issued 15 December 2010 Eating while playing a computer game or simply working through lunch could increase your food intake later in the day. Researchers from the Nutrition and Behaviour Unit in the School of Experimental Psychology have been exploring ways in which memory and attention influence our appetite and food intake.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
Sipping green tea regularly can alter how we perceive flavor
Sipping green tea regularly can alter how we perceive flavor
While trying to figure out what makes certain beverages cloudy, Cornell researchers made the startling discovery that certain chemicals in green tea - and perhaps red wine - react with saliva in ways that can alter how we perceive flavors. Specifically, regular consumption of the polyphenol-rich drinks can boost astringent sensations and our sensitivity to acids, reports Karl Siebert, professor of food science, in an article published online in Food Quality and Preference Sept.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 10.12.2010
Genome of barley disease reveals surprises
Genome of barley disease reveals surprises
Genome of barley disease reveals surprises Scientists have sequenced the genome of a major fungal disease that affects barley and other cereal crops Scientists have sequenced the genome of a major fungal disease that affects barley and other cereal crops, a breakthrough that could lead to significant advances in our understanding of how plant diseases evolve.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 01.12.2010
More fruit and veg unlikely to protect against cancer
More fruit and veg unlikely to protect against cancer
Health 01 Dec 10 There is no convincing evidence that eating more fruit and vegetables can reduce chances of developing cancer, although they are important for maintaining a healthy diet. That's the conclusion of a review by an Oxford University scientist that looked at a decade of evidence on the links between fruit and vegetables and the development of cancer.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 30.11.2010
Report sets new dietary intake levels for calcium and vitamin D
University Park, Pa. The majority of Americans are getting enough vitamin D and calcium, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine that has updated the nutritional reference values known as Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) for these interrelated nutrients. Most Americans up to age 70 need no more than 600 international units (IUs) of vitamin D per day to maintain health, and those 71 and older may need as much as 800 IUs, according to the report.

Agronomy / Food Science - 16.11.2010
Researcher explores whether fish feel pain
University Park, Pa. Do fish feel pain? Victoria Braithwaite, Penn State professor of fisheries and biology, has spent decades studying that question. In her recently published book, "Do Fish Feel Pain?" she examines whether fish are capable of experiencing pain, whether humans cause them to suffer and whether it even matters.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 15.11.2010
Overactive FTO gene does cause overeating and obesity
Overactive FTO gene does cause overeating and obesity
Science | Health 15 Nov 10 Scientists have gained strong confirmation of the direct connection between the FTO gene and obesity, obtaining the first direct evidence that overactivity of the gene leads to overeating and obesity in mice. The research team from the University of Oxford and Medical Research Council (MRC), with funding from the Wellcome Trust and MRC, have published their results .

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 10.11.2010
Book, research explore whether fish feel pain
Book, research explore whether fish feel pain
University Park, Pa. Do fish feel pain? The question is so troubling that many wish it were not even asked in a serious way, let alone answered. But ask it Penn State professor of fisheries and biology Victoria Braithwaite does in her recently published book, "Do Fish Feel Pain?" Her conclusions are thought provoking, to say the least.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 07.11.2010
Low blood levels of vitamin D linked to chubbier kids, faster weight gain
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Kids who are deficient in vitamin D accumulated fat around the waist and gained weight more rapidly than kids who got enough vitamin D, a new University of Michigan study suggests. Vitamin D, which is primarily provided to the body by the sun, has been a hot topic in the U.S. lately.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 04.11.2010
Probing Question: Why is it so hard to lose weight?
Probing Question: Why is it so hard to lose weight?
By Grace Warren Research/Penn State If you're an adult American, chances are pretty good that at one time or another you've tried to diet. Chances also are good that, despite your efforts, you've found yourself standing on a scale and looking at a certain number with frustration and disbelief. It's the same number as last week, and the week before, even though you've been cutting back on sweets and going to the gym an extra day.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 27.10.2010
New insight into links between obesity and activity in the brain
New insight into links between obesity and activity in the brain
Study on effects of anti-obesity drug on the brain paves way for more effective treatments. Scientists have revealed that an anti-obesity drug changes the way the brain responds to appetising, high-calorie foods in obese individuals. This insight may aid the development of new anti-obesity drugs which reduce the activity in the regions of the brain stimulated by the sight of tasty foods.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 20.10.2010
Obesity accounts for almost 17 percent of medical costs -- twice what was previously thought
Obesity accounts for almost 17 percent of medical costs -- twice what was previously thought
The medical costs of obesity are twice as high as previously reported, according to the first study to estimate the causal effects of obesity on U.S. medical costs. Using innovative methods, Cornell health economist John Cawley found that the annual estimated cost of treating obesity is $168 billion - 16.5 percent of the country's total medical care costs.

Agronomy / Food Science - 20.10.2010
Archaeologists uncover early Neolithic activity on Cyprus
Archaeologists uncover early Neolithic activity on Cyprus
Cornell archaeologists are helping to rewrite the early prehistory of human civilization on Cyprus, with evidence that hunter-gatherers began to form agricultural settlements on the island half a millennium earlier than previously believed. Beginning with pedestrian surveys of promising sites in 2005, students have assisted with fieldwork on Cyprus led by professor of classics Sturt Manning, director of Cornell's archaeology program.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 13.10.2010
Compound in celery, peppers reduces age-related memory deficits
Compound in celery, peppers reduces age-related memory deficits
CHAMPAIGN, lll. A diet rich in the plant compound luteolin reduces age-related inflammation in the brain and related memory deficits by directly inhibiting the release of inflammatory molecules in the brain, researchers report. Luteolin (LOOT-ee-oh-lin) is found in many plants, including carrots, peppers, celery, olive oil, peppermint, rosemary and chamomile.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 11.10.2010
Apple and pear shapes: partly down to genes
Apple and pear shapes: partly down to genes
Health 11 Oct 10 A whole set of new genes associated with body fat distribution and obesity have been identified in two major studies by an international team of researchers, including the largest study yet of DNA variation across our genomes involving almost ¼ million people. The group has identified 13 new gene regions where variations in DNA sequence can be linked to whether we are apple-shaped or pear-shaped.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 11.10.2010
Large-scale analysis identifies 32 genetic loci for obesity
An international team of researchers has identified 18 new genetic loci associated with obesity assessed by BMI, and confirmed a link between obesity and 14 previously known loci. Almost 250,000 individuals were included in the analysis, which is published. "We know that hereditary factors play a key role in the development of obesity, and thus in increasing risk of many diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes," says Erik Ingelsson, professor at the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Karolinska Institutet, and one of the principal investigators of the study.

Agronomy / Food Science - 30.09.2010
Research examines cycle of overeating and obesity
AUSTIN, Texas — New research funded through The University of Texas at Austin provides evidence of the vicious cycle created when an obese individual overeats to compensate for reduced pleasure from food. Obese individuals have fewer pleasure receptors and overeat to compensate, according to a study by University of Texas at Austin senior research fellow Eric Stice and his colleagues published this week in The Journal of Neuroscience .

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 30.09.2010
New research: infant nutrition and obesity
New research: infant nutrition and obesity
Researchers at the UCL Institute of Child Health have demonstrated for the first time in humans that feeding babies enriched milk led to statistically significant increases in body fat at age 5-8 years. The new study is published today online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition . This key finding of the link between overnutrition in infancy and body fat was independent of confounding factors such as maternal Body Mass Index.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 28.09.2010
Obesity increases risk of periodontal disease in teens
[NEWS, 28 September 2010] Teens with obesity are at increased risk of developing periodontal disease as a result of inflammation of the gums. This according to a study from Karolinska Institutet, recently published in International Journal of Pediatric Obesity. In the study, a group of teenagers with obesity were compared with the same number of teenagers with normal weight.

Earth Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 20.09.2010
NASA Study Shows Desert Dust Cuts Colorado River Flow
NASA Study Shows Desert Dust Cuts Colorado River Flow
PASADENA, Calif. Snowmelt in the Colorado River basin is occurring earlier, reducing runoff and the amount of crucial water available downstream. A new study shows this is due to increased dust caused by human activities in the region during the past 150 years. The study, led by a NASA scientist and funded by the agency and the National Science Foundation, showed peak spring runoff now comes three weeks earlier than before the region was settled and soils were disturbed.
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