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Life Sciences - Health - 28.12.2010
Left wing or right wing It's written in the brain
Left wing or right wing It’s written in the brain
If you listen to Radio 4's Today Programme on any given day, you'll inevitably hear a spectrum of politic views from socialist through liberal to conservative. You may find yourself agreeing with the interviewee or irked by their politics depending on your own political persuasion. Liberals and conservatives may find themselves disagreeing on issues as wide-ranging as the future of the NHS, the UK's involvement in Afghanistan and whether students should pay tuition fees at university, but could these differences be a result of different brain structures?

Health - Life Sciences - 23.12.2010
Paternal Diet Can Affect Genes And Health Of Offspring, Research Suggests
Dec. AUSTIN, Texas — Environmental influences experienced by a father can be passed down to the next generation, "reprogramming" how genes function in offspring, scientists at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) have discovered. A new study published this week in Cell shows environmental cues — in this case, diet — influence genes in mammals from one generation to the next, evidence that until now has been sparse.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.12.2010
Brain gene makes a female develop as a male
Australian scientists have discovered that changes to a gene involved in brain development can lead to testis formation and male genitalia in an otherwise female embryo. Lead researcher Professor Andrew Sinclair of the University of Melbourne and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute said the breakthrough would improve diagnosis and clinical management of patients with disorders of sex development (DSD).

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 22.12.2010
U of M researchers' discovery suggests a new way to prevent HIV from infecting human cells
Media Note: For a copy of the abstract and/or full article, contact Preston Smith or John Albin. MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (12/22/2010) —Researchers at the University of Minnesota have discovered how HIV binds to and destroys a specific human antiviral protein called APOBEC3F. The results suggest that a simple chemical change can convert APOBEC3F to a more effective antiviral agent and that shielding of a common feature shared by related proteins may yield a similar outcome.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.12.2010
Scientists reveal how biological activity is regulated in fruit fly and roundworm genomes
Scientists today published an almost complete catalog of the fruit fly and roundworm's functional elements ' sequences in the genome that carry out the instructions in the genome and determine which genes are turned on and off at various times in different cells. Scientists can now study functional elements in the fruit fly and roundworm that are also present in the human genome to better understand human medical conditions.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2010
Primary school children authors on science paper
Primary school children authors on science paper
A group of UK primary school children have achieved a world first by having their school science project accepted for publication in an internationally recognised peer-reviewed Royal Society journal. The paper, which reports novel findings in how bumblebees perceive colour, is published in Biology Letters today.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2010
Alzheimer's changes detectable in healthy elderly
Alzheimer’s changes detectable in healthy elderly
A team of UCL researchers, part-funded by the Alzheimer's Research Trust, has discovered that combining spinal fluid testing with MRI scans could provide an early indication of a person's risk of developing Alzheimer?s. The approach could allow scientists to test treatments or preventions far earlier in the disease, when experts believe they could be more effective.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.12.2010
Countering memory loss in the immune system
After recovering from a cold or other infection, your body's immune system is primed to react quickly if the same agent tries to infect you. White blood cells called memory T cells specifically remember the virus or bacterium and patrol the body looking for it. Vaccines work on the same principle: Harmless fragments of a virus or bacterium provoke the immune system to generate memory T cells that can attack the real thing later on.

Life Sciences - 21.12.2010
Autistic children’s exceptional visual search skills may not translate into everyday life
University of Nottingham News Press releases 2010 December Autistic children's exceptional visual search skills may not translate into everyday life PA 363/10 It is well established in scientific studies that children with autism repeatedly outperform typically-developing children on a range of visual search skills.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2010
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome not caused by XMRV
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome not caused by XMRV
Links: Wellcome Trust Professor Greg Towers Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute A virus previously thought to be associated with chronic fatigue syndrome is not the cause of the disease, a detailed study led by UCL scientists has shown. The research shows that cell samples used in previous research were contaminated with the virus identified as XMRV and that XMRV is present in the mouse genome.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.12.2010
Food in early life affects fertility
Study finds food in early life affects fertility The reproductive success of men and women is influenced by the food they receive at an early stage in life, according to new research by the University of Sheffield. The research, which was published online this month (17 December 2010) in the journal Ecology, is the first study of its kind to show that early life food can have a serious influence on the life-long fertility of individuals.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.12.2010
How the eye builds circuits to detect motion
How the eye builds circuits to detect motion
Scientists could explain how the eye creates circuits to analyze motion. The detection of motion in the retina is based on circuit asymmetry, a fundamental computational principle in the brain.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 20.12.2010
Despite damage, membrane protein structure can be seen using new X-ray technology, study reveals
Australian researchers have identified a way to measure the structure of membrane proteins despite being damaged when using X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFELs), a discovery that will help fast track the development of targeted drugs using emerging XFELs technology. About 70% of drugs on the market today depend on the activity of membrane proteins, which are complex molecules that form the membranes of the cells in our body.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 16.12.2010
FReD helps explain how a bee sees
FReD helps explain how a bee sees
FReD helps explain how a bee sees Researchers have developed a database that shows how colours appear to bees - News Adapted from a news release issued by Queen Mary, University of London Thursday 16 December 2010 Bees can see colours but they perceive the world differently to us, including variations in hue that we cannot distinguish with the naked eye.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 16.12.2010
The code for survival
When cells are exposed to life-threatening stresses, they take quick action to save themselves. Among other defenses, they start manufacturing proteins that perform critical tasks such as repairing DNA. Researchers at MIT and the University of Albany have now discovered one way that cells boost production of such proteins.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
Scientists identify how virus triggers cervical and mouth cancer
Scientists identify how virus triggers cervical and mouth cancer
University of Manchester scientists have discovered for the first time an important new way in which the human papilloma virus (HPV) triggers cancer in what could lead to new treatments for cervical and mouth cancer. HPV infection is known to increase the risk of developing cancers of the cervix and mouth with the two high-risk forms of the virus accounting for approximately 70% of all cervical cancer cases.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
University scientists expose health risks of not responding to stress
Anticipating a hectic Christmas? As the festive season gathers momentum, ageing and immunity experts at the University of Birmingham are exposing the health risks of not responding to stressful situations. Their latest research has found that people who react the least to stress could be at greater risk of conditions such as depression and obesity, and have lowered immunity to infection.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
Sipping green tea regularly can alter how we perceive flavor
Sipping green tea regularly can alter how we perceive flavor
While trying to figure out what makes certain beverages cloudy, Cornell researchers made the startling discovery that certain chemicals in green tea - and perhaps red wine - react with saliva in ways that can alter how we perceive flavors. Specifically, regular consumption of the polyphenol-rich drinks can boost astringent sensations and our sensitivity to acids, reports Karl Siebert, professor of food science, in an article published online in Food Quality and Preference Sept.

Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
What happens when we feed birds?
What happens when we feed birds?
Great tit males that are fed start singing later in the morning. This changes their territorial behavior - which could have implications for their reproductive success.

Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
No Phenylketonuria in the Moss Physcomitrella patens
International Team Discovers New Metabolic Pathway Freiburg, 14. Phenylketonuria is the most common metabolic disease in humans. It occurs when the so-called PAH gene is defective, thus preventing the amino acid phenylalanine from being metabolized to the amino acid tyrosine. This leads to an accumulation of phenylalanine and to severe developmental disorders.
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