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Results 81 - 100 of 1604.


Health - Life Sciences - 12.12.2011
Step forward in foot-and-mouth disease understanding
Scientists have discovered a mechanism they believe may play a key role in the spread of foot-and-mouth disease in animals. Researchers at the University of Leeds have been studying an enzyme - called 3D - which plays a vital role in the replication of the virus behind the disease. They have found that this enzyme forms fibrous structures (or fibrils) during the replication process.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 12.12.2011
Water on Mars: maybe martian microbes
Water on Mars: maybe martian microbes
Scientists from The Australian National University have found that extensive regions of the sub-surface of Mars could contain water and be at comfortable temperatures for terrestrial - and potentially martian - microbes. In a paper published today, researchers from the ANU Planetary Science Institute modelled Mars to evaluate its potential for harbouring inhabitable water.

Health - Psychology - 12.12.2011
Our jobs are making us sick
Our jobs are making us sick
New research at ANU has revealed that poor work conditions can adversely affect people's health. The study, led by Peter Butterworth of the Centre for Mental Health Research, revealed that poor job quality and conditions are associated with increased risk of mental and physical health problems. "The psychosocial aspects of work, such as job demands, decision control, job strain and perceptions of job insecurity, can affect mental and physical health," said Butterworth.

Physics - 11.12.2011
Multi-purpose photonic chip paves the way to programmable quantum processors
Multi-purpose photonic chip paves the way to programmable quantum processors
A multi-purpose optical chip which generates, manipulates and measures entanglement and mixture - two quantum phenomena which are essential driving forces for tomorrow's quantum computers - has been developed by researchers from the University of Bristol's Centre for Quantum Photonics. This work represents an important step forward in the race to develop a quantum computer.

History / Archeology - Psychology - 11.12.2011
Abstract thinking can make you more politically moderate
Abstract thinking can make you more politically moderate
CHAMPAIGN, lll. Partisans beware! Some of your most cherished political attitudes may be malleable! Researchers report that simply answering three "why" questions on an innocuous topic leads people to be more moderate in their views on an otherwise polarizing political issue. The research, described in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science, explored attitudes toward what some people refer to as the ground zero mosque, an Islamic community center and mosque built two blocks from the site of the former World Trade Center in New York City.

Health - 10.12.2011
Satellite images of nighttime lights help track disease outbreaks
Satellite images of nighttime lights help track disease outbreaks
Blue out, canning efforts raise $47,000 to fight child abuse, rape Berks students hold fundraiser to benefit Children's Alliance Center Penn State to create Center for the Protection of Children A message from President Rodney Erickson: The days ahead. Campus community and friends attend candlelight vigil Satellite images of nighttime lights, which normally are used to detect population centers, also can help keep tabs on diseases in developing nations, according to new research.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 09.12.2011
Rover's discovery shows water flowed underground on Mars
Rover’s discovery shows water flowed underground on Mars
NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has found a bright vein of a mineral, apparently gypsum, deposited by water. Analysis of the vein will help researchers better understand the history of wet environments on Mars. "This tells a slam-dunk story that water flowed through underground fractures in the rock," said Steve Squyres, Cornell's Goldwin Smith Professor of Astronomy and principal scientific investigator for Opportunity.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.12.2011
Picower researchers illuminate the gap between experience and association
Research may have implications for Alzheimer's disease. In the moments after lightning streaks through the sky, we wait for the clap of thunder that experience has told us is likely to follow. In a finding that may have implications for treating Alzheimer's disease, researchers at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at MIT report in the Dec.

Health - 09.12.2011
Bowel cancer screening proven to save lives
The Bowel Cancer Screening Programme in England is on course to cut bowel cancer deaths by 16 per cent, according to a University of Nottingham-led study of the first 1 million test results. But the survey suggests that better screening techniques should be developed because bowel cancers on the right side of the body were not as likely to be picked up as those on the left.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.12.2011
Slow road to stability for emulsions
Slow road to stability for emulsions
Physical equilibrium, assumed to be almost instant, may take months or years for particles in oil-water mixtures By studying the behavior of tiny particles at an interface between oil and water, researchers at Harvard have discovered that stabilized emulsions may take longer to reach equilibrium than previously thought.

Life Sciences - 09.12.2011
Star Wars-inspired bacterium provides glimpse into life
Star Wars-inspired bacterium provides glimpse into life
A bacterium whose name was inspired by the Star Wars films has provided new clues into the evolution of our own cells and how they came to possess the vital energy-producing units called mitochondria. The University of Sydney research investigated the bacterium Midichloria mitochondrii - named after helpful Star Wars microbes, called Midi-chlorians, that live inside cells and grant the mystical power known as The Force.

Environment - 09.12.2011
Dolomite discovery ends 100-year treasure hunt
Dolomite discovery ends 100-year treasure hunt
The century-old mystery of a missing mineral in coral reefs has been solved by a team from The Australian National University. The team, led by Bradley Opdyke of the Research School of Earth Sciences, has uncovered a hidden stash of the mineral dolomite in coral reefs around the globe, ending a search that has lasted over 100 years.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.12.2011
Rare gene variant implicates vitamin D in cause of multiple sclerosis
Rare gene variant implicates vitamin D in cause of multiple sclerosis
A rare genetic variant that appears to be directly and causally linked to multiple sclerosis (MS) has been identified by Oxford University researchers. Importantly, the mutation in the CYP27B1 gene affects a key enzyme which leads people with the variant to have lower levels of vitamin D, adding weight to the suggested link between vitamin D and MS.

Administration - History / Archeology - 09.12.2011
Bridging the divide
New study shows how integrated institutions can lead diverse populations to cooperate in rebuilding countries. One of the most pressing issues in world affairs today is state building: how countries can construct stable, inclusive governments in which a variety of religious and ethnic groups coexist.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.12.2011
Proteins linked to longevity may be involved in mood control
Excess of sirtuins can produce anxiety, a possible evolutionary adaptation to dietary restriction. Over the past decade, MIT biologist Leonard Guarente and others have shown that very-low-calorie diets provoke a comprehensive physiological response that promotes survival, all orchestrated by a set of proteins called sirtuins.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.12.2011
Scientists use animal-free reagents to create clinical-grade neurons from skin cells
Scientists use animal-free reagents to create clinical-grade neurons from skin cells
Using a specially designed facility, UCLA stem cell scientists have taken human skin cells, reprogrammed them into cells with the same unlimited property as embryonic stem cells, and then differentiated them into neurons while completely avoiding the use of animal-based reagents and feeder conditions throughout the process.

Health - Administration - 08.12.2011
Child maltreatment shows no signs of significant decrease
New research published in The Lancet (9 December 2011) shows no consistent decrease in the maltreatment of children across several countries over the last two decades. Despite years of policy initiatives designed to achieve it, research revealed by a collaboration between Warwick Medical School and University College London Institute of Child Health (ICH) concludes that despite numerous government policy initiatives designed to achieve a reduction in child maltreatment, none has proved successful.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.12.2011
Personalised treatment for Crohn's Disease a step closer following gene mapping
Personalised treatment for Crohn’s Disease a step closer following gene mapping
Three new locations for Crohn's Disease genes have been uncovered by scientists at UCL using a novel gene mapping approach. The complex genetic and environmental causes of Crohn's Disease (CD) have long been difficult to untangle. CD, a type of Inflammatory Bowel Disease that affects about 100 to 150 people per 100,000 in Europe, is characterised by inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract.

Health - 08.12.2011
St. David’s Foundation Supports Health Care for the Underserved at the School of Nursing at The University of Texas at Austin
AUSTIN, Texas — The School of Nursing at The University of Texas at Austin will use a $3 million gift to permanently endow the Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research in Underserved Populations (CHPR) . The interdisciplinary center will be renamed for St. David's. "We are very pleased that this gift from the St. David's Foundation will allow the center to continue to support the important and innovative health-related research of faculty from many departments at the University of Texas at Austin," said Alexa Stuifbergen , dean of the School of Nursing.

Life Sciences - 08.12.2011
House-hunting honey bees shed light on how human brains come to a decision
House-hunting honey bees shed light on how human brains come to a decision
Avoiding deadlock in group decision making is a common problem for committees - but house-hunting honey bees may hold the answer, according to new research from Cornell University, the University of Cailfornia-Riverside, the University of Sheffield and the University of Bristol. The study also reveals a striking similarity between how honey bee swarms and our own brains choose between alternatives.