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Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 26.12.2011
Evidence found for brain injury in diet-induced obesity
The first evidence, reported today, of structural changes in the brains of rodents and humans with diet-induced obesity may help explain one of the most vexing problems of body weight control. Michael W. Schwartz, professor of medicine at the University of Washington, is the senior author of the study.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.12.2011
Three new eczema genes discovered
Researchers from Children of the 90s at the University of Bristol, in collaboration with 22 other studies from across the world, have discovered three new genetic variants associated with the skin condition eczema, a chronic inflammatory disease that afflicts millions of patients around the world. Previous research in Europeans had only identified two major genes, so this is a significant breakthrough that will help diagnose and treat the condition in the long term.

Health - 23.12.2011
MRI scan ’better’ for heart patients
A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan for coronary heart disease is better than the most commonly-used alternative, a major UK trial of heart disease patients has shown. The findings by University of Leeds researchers could change the way that people with suspected heart disease are assessed, potentially avoiding the need for tests that are invasive or use ionising radiation.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.12.2011
New target for HIV drugs
MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (12/22/2011) —Researchers from the University of Minnesota's College of Biological Sciences, working with colleagues at the University of California, San Francisco, have discovered a new target for HIV drug therapy that could make it possible for natural human antiviral proteins to destroy HIV.

Art and Design - Health - 22.12.2011
No butts about it: Teens who view smoking in movies likely to use cigarettes for the first time
ANN ARBOR, Mich.-Teens who see movie characters using cigarettes are quicker to try smoking than their peers who did not watch the same scene, a new study finds. However, the exposure to movie images involving cigarettes does not appear to lead teens who have tried smoking to become regular smokers sooner, said Sonya Dal Cin, an assistant professor of communication studies at the University of Michigan and the study's lead author.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.12.2011
How bacteria fight fluoride in toothpaste and in nature
Yale researchers have uncovered the molecular tricks used by bacteria to fight the effects of fluoride, which is commonly used in toothpaste and mouthwash to combat tooth decay. In the Dec. 22 online issue of the journal Science Express, the researchers report that sections of RNA messages called riboswitches - which control the expression of genes - detect the build-up of fluoride and activate the defenses of bacteria, including those that contribute to tooth decay.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.12.2011
DNA Mismatch Repair Happens Only During A Brief Window of Opportunity
In eukaryotes - the group of organisms that include humans - a key to survival is the ability of certain proteins to quickly and accurately repair genetic errors that occur when DNA is replicated to make new cells. In a paper published in the December 23, 2011 issue of the journal Science, researchers at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have solved part of the mystery of how these proteins do their job, a process called DNA mismatch repair (MMR).

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2011
Search and rescue: scientists identify a novel therapy with potential for treating Parkinson’s disease
Search and rescue: scientists identify a novel therapy with potential for treating Parkinson’s disease
A collaboration between virologists and neuroscientists at Cambridge University has demonstrated how viruses that cross the blood/brain barrier could be exploited to slow down, or even halt, the progress of Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2011
Size Matters: Measuring Brain Thickness Identifies Risk for Cognitive Decline, Penn Study Shows
A new measurement tool can identify cognitively normal adults who are at high risk for cognitive decline, according to a new study by collaborators at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard Medical School. The study is published in the December 21, 2011, online issue of Neurology , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2011
Possible cure for leukemia found by Penn State researchers
Possible cure for leukemia found by Penn State researchers
University pledges continued cooperation with NCAA inquiry Hotels to support RAINN over commencement weekend A message from President Rodney Erickson As lawmakers review child abuse laws, Erickson expresses support Blue out, canning efforts raise $47,000 to fight child abuse, rape UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.12.2011
Study details how dengue infection hits harder second time around
http://www.berkeley.edu/news2/2011/12/dengue.flv As part of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's (HHMI) 2010 Holiday Lectures on Science, UC Berkeley's Eva Harris talked about her work with scientists and clinicians in Nicaragua on dengue over the past two decades. Here, several partners in Nicaragua talk about the impact of this collaboration.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 21.12.2011
Supersized market economy, supersized belly: Wealthier nations have more fast food and more obesity
ANN ARBOR, Mich.-New research from the University of Michigan suggests obesity can be seen as one of the unintended side effects of free market policies. A study of 26 wealthy nations shows that countries with a higher density of fast food restaurants per capita had much higher obesity rates compared to countries with a lower density of fast food restaurants per capita.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2011
Can nerve growth factor gene therapy prevent diabetic heart disease?
Can nerve growth factor gene therapy prevent diabetic heart disease?
Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and can reduce blood supply to the heart tissue and damage cardiac cells, resulting in heart failure. New research has investigated if nerve growth factor (NGF) gene therapy can prevent diabetic heart failure and small vascular disease in mice.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2011
New malaria vaccine may stop deadly parasites in their tracks
New malaria vaccine may stop deadly parasites in their tracks
A new malaria vaccine with the potential to neutralise all strains of the most deadly species of malaria parasite has been developed by an Oxford University-led team. The scientists from the Jenner Institute at the University of Oxford have shown that their vaccine induces an antibody response in animal models that is capable of neutralising all the strains they tested of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum .

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2011
Breast cancer and heart disease may have common roots
Women who are at risk for breast cancer may also be at greater risk for heart disease, new research from the University of Toronto and St. Michael's Hospital has found. The majority of women with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer have a mutated form of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, which normally suppress the growth of breast and ovarian tumours.

Health - 20.12.2011
430,000 study to test new drug preventing heart disease in diabetics
20 Dec 2011 A drug that removes excess copper from people with diabetes resulting in improved function of the heart is to be tested in a national trial led by researchers in Manchester. The research team has received funding of 430,000 for the phase 2B trial from the J P Moulton Charitable Foundation, set up by entrepreneur Jon Moulton to fund non-commercial clinical trials.

Health - 20.12.2011
Pre-surgery exam rates vary widely among hospitals
Hospitals vary greatly in the number of patients who see an internal medicine specialist before major non-cardiac surgery, with rates ranging from five per cent of patients to 90 per cent, new research from the University of Toronto and St. Michael's Hospital has found.

Health - Chemistry - 20.12.2011
New sugar a treat for diabetes treatment
New sugar a treat for diabetes treatment
Researchers from The Australian National University have discovered a new treatment for Type-1 diabetes - an autoimmune disease which currently affects some 130,000 Australians. Charmaine Simeonovic and Professor Christopher Parish from The John Curtin School of Medical Research have identified a previously unknown process which causes destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.

Health - 19.12.2011
Statins may reduce mortality in influenza patients, team finds
The two most common weapons to fight influenza are an annual immunization and the use of antiviral drugs. A team of investigators has found that statins - a drug widely used to lower cholesterol - may offer additional benefits that complement these approaches and reduces mortality among patients with influenza.

Psychology - Health - 19.12.2011
Lower classes quicker to show compassion in the face of suffering
Emotional differences between the rich and poor, as depicted in such Charles Dickens classics as "A Christmas Carol" and "A Tale of Two Cities," may have a scientific basis. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have found that people in the lower socio-economic classes are more physiologically attuned to suffering, and quicker to express compassion than their more affluent counterparts.
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