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Health - Environment - 12.12.2012
The slower you grow, the longer you live: growth rate influences lifespan
New research from the University of Glasgow suggests that lifespan is affected by the rate at which bodies grow early in life. A paper published today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B outlines how manipulating growth rates in stickleback fish can extend their lifespan by nearly a third or reduce it by 15 percent.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2012
Intracranial pressure monitoring for traumatic brain injury questioned
Intracranial pressure monitoring for traumatic brain injury questioned
Posted under: Health and Medicine , News Releases , Research , UW and the Community For patients with a traumatic brain injury, the default standard of care has just been turned on its head by a group of UW researchers working with colleagues at six hospitals in Bolivia and Ecuador. In a study published Dec.

Astronomy / Space Science - 11.12.2012
An older Vega: New insights about the star all others are measured by
ANN ARBOR-Vega, a star astronomers have used as a touchstone to measure other stars' brightness for thousands of years, may be more than 200 million years older than previously thought. That's according to new findings from the University of Michigan. The researchers estimated Vega's age by precisely measuring its spin speed with a tool called the Michigan Infrared Combiner, developed by John Monnier, associate professor of astronomy in U-M's College of Literature.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2012
Capturing circulating cancer cells could provide insights into how disease spreads
Capturing circulating cancer cells could provide insights into how disease spreads
ANN ARBOR-A glass plate with a nanoscale roughness could be a simple way for scientists to capture and study the circulating tumor cells that carry cancer around the body through the bloodstream. Engineering and medical researchers at the University of Michigan have devised such a set-up, which they say takes advantage of cancer cells' stronger drive to settle and bind compared with normal blood cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2012
Diabetes drug may work against Alzheimer's
Diabetes drug may work against Alzheimer’s
Medical researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered that a drug intended for diabetes appears to restore memory in brain cells affected by Alzheimer's disease. Jack Jhamandas , a researcher with the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry at the U of A, is the principal investigator with the team whose research results were recently published in the peer-reviewed publication The Journal of Neuroscience .

Life Sciences - Psychology - 11.12.2012
Infants process faces long before they recognize other objects, Stanford vision researchers find
Infants process faces long before they recognize other objects, Stanford vision researchers find
Stanford Report, December 11, 2012 Using brain-monitoring technology, Stanford psychology researchers have discovered that infant brains respond to faces in much the same way as adult brains do, even while the rest of their visual system lags behind. By Max McClure Any mother will tell you that infants love staring at faces.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.12.2012
Alternative to fullerenes in organic solar cells - just as exciting
An insight into the properties of fullerene is set to open the door to a new class of electronic acceptors which can be used to build better and cheaper organic solar cells. Organic solar cells have advanced a great deal since they were first invented nearly 20 years ago, but the fullerene component has remained largely the same and this has had a braking effect on the evolution of the technology.

Pedagogy - Health - 11.12.2012
Mexican American toddlers lag in preliteracy skills, but not in their social skills, new study shows
Mexican American toddlers lag in preliteracy skills, but not in their social skills, new study shows
Mexican American toddlers lag in preliteracy skills, but not in their social skills, new study shows By Kathleen Maclay , Media Relations Mexican American preschoolers fall behind their white counterparts in terms of early language and preliteracy skills, but the social competencies between the two groups are indistinguishable, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley, and UCLA.

Life Sciences - 11.12.2012
Researchers identify new components of the epigenetic ‘code' for honey bee development
Researchers identify new components of the epigenetic ‘code’ for honey bee development
Researchers from the UK and Australia have uncovered a new element of the honeybee's genetic makeup, which may help to explain why bees are so sensitive to environmental changes. Scientists from the University of Sheffield, Queen Mary, University of London and the Australian National University, have found that honeybees have a 'histone code' - a series of marks on the histone proteins around which their DNA is wrapped in order to fit into the nucleus of a cell.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.12.2012
Faulty gene linked to condition in infants
Researchers at King's College London have for the first time identified a defective gene at the root of Vici syndrome, a rare inherited disorder which affects infants from birth, leading to impaired development of the brain, eyes and skin, and progressive failure of the heart, skeletal muscles and the immune system.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.12.2012
How our nerves regulate insulin secretion
How our nerves regulate insulin secretion
The autonomic nervous system, which is the part of the nervous system beyond conscious control, plays an important role in the release of insulin from beta cells in the endocrine part of the pancreas. The process by which this occurs has been a mystery, since it is difficult to give detailed study to such an inaccessible organ.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2012
Prostate cancer now detectable using imaging-guided biopsy, UCLA study demonstrates
Groundbreaking research by a team of UCLA physicians and engineers shows that prostate cancer — long identifiable only through painful, hit-or-miss biopsies — can be diagnosed far more easily and accurately using a new image-guided, targeted biopsy procedure. Traditionally, prostate tumors have been found through so-called blind biopsies, in which tissue samples are taken systematically from the entire prostate in the hopes of locating a piece of tumor — a technique that dates back to the 1980s.

Social Sciences - Health - 10.12.2012
Teen dating violence linked to long-term harmful effects
Teen dating violence linked to long-term harmful effects
Teenagers in physically or psychologically aggressive dating relationships are more than twice as likely to repeat such damaging relationships as adults and report increased substance use and suicidal feelings years later, compared with teens with healthy dating experiences, reports a new Cornell study.

Chemistry - Earth Sciences - 10.12.2012
Mining ancient ores for clues to early life
An analysis of sulfide ore deposits from one of the world's richest base-metal mines confirms that oxygen levels were extremely low on Earth 2.7 billion years ago, but also shows that microbes were actively feeding on sulfate in the ocean and influencing seawater chemistry during that geological time period.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 10.12.2012
Inspiration from a porcupine’s quills
Understanding the mechanisms behind quill penetration and extraction could help engineers design better medical devices. Anyone unfortunate enough to encounter a porcupine's quills knows that once they go in, they are extremely difficult to remove. Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital now hope to exploit the porcupine quill's unique properties to develop new types of adhesives, needles and other medical devices.

Environment - 10.12.2012
Conservatives can be persuaded to care more about the environment, study finds
Conservatives can be persuaded to care more about the environment, study finds
When it comes to climate change, deforestation and toxic waste, the assumption has been that conservative views on these topics are intractable. But new research from the University of California, Berkeley, suggests that such viewpoints can be changed after all, when the messages about the need to be better stewards of the land are couched in terms of fending off threats to the "purity" and "sanctity" of Earth and our bodies.

Health - Chemistry - 10.12.2012
UCLA cancer scientists identify liposarcoma tumors that respond to chemotherapy
Liposarcoma, the most common type of sarcoma, is an often lethal form of cancer that develops in fat cells. It is particularly deadly, in part, because the tumors are not consistently visible with positron emission tomography (PET) scans that use a common probe called FDG and because they frequently do not respond to chemotherapy.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 10.12.2012
Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test
Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test
Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next generation gas turbine engines, but real-time analysis of the mechanical properties of these space-age materials at ultrahigh temperatures has been a challenge - until now. Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed the first testing facility that enables CT-scanning of ceramic composites under controlled loads at ultrahigh temperatures and in real-time.

Law / Forensics - 10.12.2012
Are jurors influenced by special courtroom measures?
Alleged adult rape victims are not disadvantaged in court if they choose to give evidence behind protective screens or via video links, according to new research. The study, jointly led by the University of Leeds and University of Nottingham, is the first of its kind in the UK to examine the impact of the use of technology and special measures in adult rape trials on juror decision-making.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 10.12.2012
Silver lining to coral reef climate cloud
Silver lining to coral reef climate cloud
Researchers have found parts of our coral reefs are more resistant to ocean acidification than first thought, casting a ray of hope on the future of our reefs. The study, published today, details their analyses of the mineral structure of coralline algae, which form a hard ridge around the reef, protecting delicate corals from harsh waves and holding the structure together.