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Health - Business / Economics - 19.12.2012
The drugs don’t work
The drugs don’t work
Health Technology Assessment is not 'pure science'. The drug industry is a key actor in the process of issuing recommendations" —Professor Larry King King and colleagues Piotr Ozieranski (University of Leicester) and Martin McKee (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) found that multinational drug companies are deploying their massive financial resources to capture stakeholders at every stage of the process for the scientific recommendation of drugs in Poland.

Life Sciences - Business / Economics - 18.12.2012
The Green Revolution is wilting
The Green Revolution is wilting
The Green Revolution has stagnated for key food crops in many regions of the world, according to a new study. Led by IonE research fellow Deepak Ray, the study team developed geographically detailed maps of annual crop harvested areas and yields of maize (corn), rice, wheat and soybeans from 1961 to 2008.

Business / Economics - Mechanical Engineering - 05.12.2012
The detectives of corrosion
Corrosion costs the oil and gas industry billions of dollars every year, it can also have far reaching environmental consequences. But so far no one has managed to stop corrosion happening. A detective style research team based at The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus are working closely with industry to investigate real world problems and are taking a forensic look at the nature of corrosion — particularly in the oil and gas sector.

Business / Economics - Health - 03.12.2012
Only a third of us show a consistent approach to financial risk
Empirically rich new study finds most people alter their risk-management approach depending on the type of financial decision. Take a moment to consider some of the financial choices you've made in recent years. Do you have a consistent approach to your money, either by playing it safe or having a willingness to take risks?

Business / Economics - 20.11.2012
Evidence of ’mid-life’ crisis in Great Apes
Chimpanzees and orangutans can experience a mid-life crisis just like humans, a study suggests. This is the finding from a new study that set out to test the theory that the pattern of human well-being over a lifespan might have evolved in the common ancestors of humans and great apes.

Health - Business / Economics - 19.11.2012
Health insurance should be included in measures of poverty, income
Health insurance should be included in measures of poverty, income
The value of health insurance should be included in official measures of U.S. income and poverty, because it will help us to better evaluate public policies like Obamacare, according to a new study by a Cornell economist and his colleagues. Using this methodology, they show that Obamacare will generate significant benefits for families in the lowest economic classes - benefits overlooked when using traditional calculations.

Business / Economics - 15.11.2012
Women eager to negotiate salaries, when given the opportunity
Although some scholars have suggested that the income gap between men and women is due to women's reluctance to negotiate salaries, a new study at the University of Chicago shows that given an invitation, women are just as willing as men to negotiate for more pay. Men, however, are more likely than women to ask for more money when there is no explicit statement in a job description that wages are negotiable, the study showed.

Business / Economics - Continuing Education - 14.11.2012
How honest are you at work?
A new study has revealed we are basically honest. The research by the University of Oxford and the University of Bonn suggests that it pains us to tell lies, particularly when we are in our own homes. It appears that being honest is hugely important to our sense of who we are. However, while it might bother us to tell lies at home, we are more likely to bend the truth at work, suggests the study.

Administration - Business / Economics - 13.11.2012
Games may help train analysts to overcome bias
University Park, Pa. Game-playing may help intelligence analysts with the serious business of identifying biases that can cloud decision-making and problem-solving during life or death situations, according to researchers. Analytic exercises conducted by researchers at Raytheon that used scenario-based games designed by Col.

Health - Business / Economics - 08.11.2012
Financial incentives may improve hospital mortality rates, says study
Financial incentives may improve hospital mortality rates, says study
A "significant” fall in mortality rates for certain conditions emerged in a study into the use of incentives at hospitals in the North West of England. Economists and health experts from the Universities of Manchester, Nottingham, Birmingham and Cambridge examined how the introduction of a scheme that paid bonuses to hospitals based on measures of quality affected the delivery of care.

Health - Business / Economics - 07.11.2012
Financial incentives may improve hospital mortality rates, says study
PA 309/12 New research into controversial pay-for-performance schemes has suggested they may help to save the lives of NHS patients. A ‘significant' fall in mortality rates for certain conditions emerged in a study by health experts and economists from the Universities of Nottingham, Manchester, Cambridge and Birmingham into the use of incentives at hospitals in the North West of England.

Careers / Employment - Business / Economics - 05.11.2012
Hidden cyberbullying is as common as conventional counterpart in the workplace
Hidden cyberbullying is as common as conventional counterpart in the workplace
Cyberbullying through e-mail, text and web posts is as common in the workplace as conventional bullying but even more difficult to uncover, research by experts from the University of Sheffield has revealed. Occupational psychologists Christine Sprigg, Carolyn Axtell and Sam Farley of the University of Sheffield, together with Iain Coyne of the University of Nottingham, turned the focus of their investigation onto cyberbullying of adult workers, instead of younger people in schools, for which more research has taken place.

Business / Economics - Careers / Employment - 03.11.2012
Punched from the Screen - workplace cyber bullying becoming more widespread
Punched from the Screen - workplace cyber bullying becoming more widespread
Cyber bullying - using modern such as e-mails, texts or web-postings - is as common in the workplace as ‘conventional' bullying. Yet, the way cyber bullying influences both the victim and witnesses is more hidden in the workplace. These are the findings of ‘Punched from the Screen' - new research into workplace bullying carried out by occupational psychologists at The University of Nottingham and the University of Sheffield.

Business / Economics - Computer Science / Telecom - 02.11.2012
World's largest study to date into computer-based financial trading reveals beneficial effects but warns of systemic risks
World’s largest study to date into computer-based financial trading reveals beneficial effects but warns of systemic risks
A new Government research project , undertaken by an international team of researchers including experts from the University of Bristol, into the advantages and risks of computer-based trading in financial markets has shown it to have beneficial effects but warned of the risks of greater instability.

Business / Economics - Social Sciences - 01.11.2012
Millionaire migration a myth, say researchers at Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality
Millionaire migration a myth, say researchers at Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality
Stanford Report, November 2, 2012 Anti-tax advocates argue that millionaires will flee from states that raise taxes on their highest earners. But a study by Stanford and Princeton researchers shows no evidence of millionaire migration in response to recent tax rate changes. Other factors, such as personal and business, seem to weigh more heavily in deciding where to live.

Continuing Education - Business / Economics - 01.11.2012
Puberty classes drive up attendance in African schoolgirls
Puberty classes drive up attendance in African schoolgirls
An Oxford University pilot study, published in the journal PLoS One , shows that providing free sanitary pads to teenage girls in Ghana markedly improved attendance levels at school over just three months. More surprisingly perhaps, the attendance levels of girls who did not get free pads but had lessons on puberty also improved by the same rate over a slightly longer period of five months.

Business / Economics - 31.10.2012
Disaster relief helps the incumbent, Stanford research shows
Disaster relief helps the incumbent, Stanford research shows
Stanford Report, October 31, 2012 A 2009 study from the Stanford Graduate School of Business and Loyola Marymount University suggests President Obama may get a bump in the polls from Superstorm Sandy. How might Superstorm Sandy affect the 2012 presidential election? Political analysts are speculating about the impact of the storm on early voting and the candidates' abilities to campaign in battleground states.

Business / Economics - Agronomy / Food Science - 31.10.2012
An app to re-empower farmers
An app to re-empower farmers
A cell phone application enables Indian farmers to better negotiate the sale of their harvests. Farmbook is designed for use by this population segment, where illiteracy is very common.

Business / Economics - 22.10.2012
Study Examines When and How Negative Campaign Ads Are Effective
October 22, 2012 — Televised political advertising takes up a large portion of campaign budgets, much of which are spent on negative political ads. But do these negative ads work? A new study by Juliana Fernandes, assistant professor of strategic communication at the University of Miami School of Communication , shows that a negative political ad is most effective when it's shown in moderation.

Business / Economics - 10.10.2012
Universities better at innovation than they are given credit for
Research and innovation policy is based on myths and false ideas, according to Professor Åsa Lindholm Dahlstrand at CIRCLE, the centre for innovation research at Lund University. Her own research has been misinterpreted and used as a weapon in the debate. “People draw the conclusion that Swedish findings and patents do not create jobs and growth to the same extent as in other countries, such as the USA.
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