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Results 21 - 40 of 130.


Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.11.2012
Analyzing Lake Geneva from the air
Analyzing Lake Geneva from the air
One year after the MIR submersibles dove into the depths of Lake Geneva, the elemo program is delivering its first scientific results. The operation will be extended with a campaign to make observations above the lake surface from a sensor-packed ultralight aircraft. The same experiments are planned above Lake Baikal in Russia.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 19.11.2012
University establishes Europe's first tall tower greenhouse gas measurements network
University establishes Europe’s first tall tower greenhouse gas measurements network
A network of integrated greenhouse gas measurements in the UK and Ireland - the first of its kind in Europe - has been established by researchers at the University of Bristol. A network of integrated greenhouse gas measurements in the UK and Ireland - the first of its kind in Europe - has been established by researchers at the University of Bristol.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 15.11.2012
USA’s ancient hurricane belt and the US-Canada Equator
The recent storms that have battered settlements on the east coast of America may have been much more frequent in the region 450 million years ago, according to scientists. New research pinpointing the positions of the Equator and the landmasses of the USA, Canada and Greenland, during the Ordovician Period 450 million years ago, indicates that the equator ran down the western side of North America with a hurricane belt to the east.

Earth Sciences - Health - 15.11.2012
College welcomes the fourth cohort of Junior Research Fellows
College welcomes the fourth cohort of Junior Research Fellows
Imperial's ever-popular Junior Research Fellowship Scheme has just welcomed its fourth cohort of 21 new Fellows to College, taking the total number of scientists supported by the scheme to almost 80. This year's Fellows are working in areas that include neurodegenerative disorders, neglected tropical diseases, algebraic geometry, electromagnetic waves, synchrotron X-rays, optoelectronics, quantum mechanics and general relativity.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 14.11.2012
El Yunque Rock, an Icon of Puerto Rico, Is Eroding More Slowly Than Expected, Penn Geologists Discover
El Yunque Rock, an Icon of Puerto Rico, Is Eroding More Slowly Than Expected, Penn Geologists Discover
El Yunque rock is a majestic, anvil-shaped promontory that has been an icon of the island of Puerto Rico since pre-Columbian times. The barren rock, standing 3,412 feet high, protrudes above primary old growth forest and is enshrouded in clouds, swept constantly by the trade winds and frequently stricken by hurricanes.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space - 13.11.2012
Satellites Could Help Predict Volcanic Eruptions
Satellites Could Help Predict Volcanic Eruptions
— A new study by scientists at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science uses Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to investigate deformation prior to the eruption of active volcanoes in Indonesia's west Sunda arc. Led by geophysicist Estelle Chaussard and Falk Amelung, the study uncovered evidence that several volcanoes did in fact "inflate" prior to eruptions due to the rise of magma.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 02.11.2012
From grasses to shrubs: how plants reinforce desertification
From grasses to shrubs: how plants reinforce desertification
Research into how fragile dryland ecosystems degrade into deserts has revealed that the transition from grasslands to desert shrubs may be reinforced by the plants themselves. The study, conducted at the University of Bristol, demonstrates for the first time that grass and shrub areas lose very different amounts of nutrients during rainfall events, which may be significant in how desert shrubs persist in these landscapes.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 01.11.2012
Nereidum Montes helps unlock Mars' glacial past
Nereidum Montes helps unlock Mars’ glacial past
On 6 June, the high-resolution stereo camera on ESA's Mars Express revisited the Argyre basin as featured in our October release, but this time aiming at Nereidum Montes, some 380 km northeast of Hooke crater. The stunning rugged terrain of Nereidum Montes marks the far northern extent of Argyre, one of the largest impact basins on Mars.

Earth Sciences - 31.10.2012
Tabletop fault model reveals why some quakes lead to faster shaking
Tabletop fault model reveals why some quakes lead to faster shaking
The more time it takes for an earthquake fault to heal, the faster the shake it will produce when it finally ruptures, according to a new study by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, who conducted their work using a tabletop model of a quake fault. "The high frequency waves of an earthquake - the kind that produces the rapid jolts - are not well understood because they are more difficult to measure and more difficult to model,” said study lead author Gregory McLaskey, a former UC Berkeley Ph.D.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 30.10.2012
Ancient ecosystem’s vulnerability to catastrophe contributed to dinosaur extinction
A mass extinction about 65 million years ago wiped out numerous species, most famously the dinosaurs, but a new study finds that latent vulnerabilities in the structure of North American ecosystems made the extinction worse than it might have been. Researchers at the University of Chicago , the California Academy of Sciences and the Field Museum of Natural History published their findings Oct.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 22.10.2012
New understanding of Antarctic’s weight-loss
New data which more accurately measures the rate of ice-melt could help us better understand how Antarctica is changing in the light of global warming. New data which more accurately measures the rate of ice-melt could help us better understand how Antarctica is changing in the light of global warming.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 17.10.2012
Keck observations reveal complex face of Uranus
The two faces of Uranus as seen through the adaptive optics on the near-infrared camera of the Keck II telescope in Hawaii. The white features are high altitude clouds like Earth's cumulous clouds, while the bright blue-green features are thinner high-altitude clouds akin to cirrus clouds. Reddish tints indicate deeper cloud layers.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 17.10.2012
Tiny travelers from deep space could assist in healing Fukushima's nuclear scar
Tiny travelers from deep space could assist in healing Fukushima’s nuclear scar
Researchers have devised a method to use cosmic rays to gather detailed information from inside the damaged cores of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors. Researchers examine use of cosmic-ray radiography on damaged reactor cores LOS ALAMOS, N.M. Oct. 17, 2012—Researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory have devised a method to use cosmic rays to gather detailed information from inside the damaged cores of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors, which were heavily damaged in March 2011 by a tsunami that followed a great earthquake.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.10.2012
Ice sheet retreat controlled by the landscape
Ice-sheet retreat can halt temporarily during long phases of climate warming, according to scientists. A UK team led by Durham University has found that the geometry of channels beneath the ice can be a strong control on ice behaviour, temporarily hiding the signals of retreat. The findings, which provide the first simulation of past ice-sheet retreat and collapse over a tenthousand year period in Antarctica, shed new light on what makes ice stable or unstable and will help refine predictions of future ice extent and global sea-level rise, the researchers say.

Earth Sciences - Education - 16.10.2012
Study advances understanding of volcanic eruptions
Volcanic eruptions vary from common, small eruptions that have little impact on humans and the environment to rare, large-to-gigantic eruptions so massive they can threaten civilizations. While scientists don't yet fully understand the mechanisms that control whether an eruption is large or small, they do know that eruptions are driven by the rapid expansion of bubbles formed from water and other volatile substances trapped in molten rock as it rises beneath a volcano.

Earth Sciences - 16.10.2012
X-rays provide insights into volcanic processes
X-rays provide insights into volcanic processes
Experiments investigate processes inside volcanic materials that determine whether a volcano will erupt violently or mildly. In the experiments, an international team of scientists used a laser-based heating system to heat small pieces of volcanic material similarly to conditions present at the beginning of a volcanic eruption.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 16.10.2012
Ice-sheet retreat controlled by the landscape
Ice-sheet retreat can halt temporarily during long phases of climate warming, a UK team including an expert from the University of Sheffield have revealed. The team has found that the geometry of channels beneath the ice can be a strong control on ice behaviour, temporarily hiding the signals of retreat.

Earth Sciences - 11.10.2012
Erosion research at iconic St Paul's shows benefit of declining pollution levels
Erosion research at iconic St Paul’s shows benefit of declining pollution levels
Erosion research at iconic St Paul's shows benefit of declining pollution levels One of London's most iconic buildings, St Paul's Cathedral, is safer from pollution eroding its limestone façade than it has been since it was built 300 years ago, according to scientists - but it might turn green in the future.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 11.10.2012
First evidence of dynamo generation on an asteroid
A meteorite found in Antarctica holds evidence of a once-active dynamo on Vesta. About 4.6 billion years ago, the solar system was little more than a tenuous disk of gas and dust. In the span of merely 10 million years, this soup evolved to form today's massive, complex planets. In the intervening period, however, the solar system contained a mixture of intermediary bodies - small chunks of rock, the remnants of which today are known as asteroids.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 09.10.2012
Marine scientists charting the location of North Atlantic deep-sea coral reefs
A team of marine biologists and geologists have unveiled the first-ever set of maps detailing where vulnerable deep-sea habitats including cold water coral reefs and sponge fields are likely to be found in the North East Atlantic. The team from Plymouth University, the Marine Biological Association, and the British Geological Survey, have used complex modelling techniques to chart a surface area more than three times the size of the UKs terrestrial boundaries.