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Life Sciences - Environment - 04.05.2012
Australia's disappearing sea snakes
Australia’s disappearing sea snakes
Australia's sea snakes may be more in danger of extinction than previously thought, marine scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies say. New research by Vimoksalehi Lukoschek from James Cook University with Professor Rick Shine from the University of Sydney, on turtleheaded sea snakes, has found that they are strongly attached to their home reef and rarely venture even a few kilometres to neighbouring reefs.

Environment - 03.05.2012
Plant diversity is key to maintaining productive vegetation, U of M study shows
Unprecedented long-term study conducted over 14-year period at U's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (05/03/2012) —Vegetation, such as a patch of prairie or a forest stand, is more productive in the long run when more plant species are present, a new University of Minnesota study shows.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.05.2012
Ecosystem effects of biodiversity loss could rival impacts of climate change and pollution
Loss of biodiversity appears to impact ecosystems as much as climate change, pollution and other major forms of environmental stress, according to a recent study by a team of researchers based at nine institutions in Canada, the United States and Sweden. Their study is the first comprehensive effort to directly compare the impacts of biological diversity loss to the anticipated effects of a host of other human-caused environmental changes.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.05.2012
Experiments Underestimate Plant Responses to Climate Change
This spring's warmer temperatures produced an earlier than normal bloom for cherry blossoms in DC's tidal basin. Credit: Elizabeth Wolkovich Experiments may dramatically underestimate how plants will respond to climate change in the future. which found that shifts in the timing of flowering and leafing in plants due to global warming appear to be much greater than estimated by warming experiments.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.05.2012
Male orangutans need quality forests
Male orangutans need quality forests
Cardiff University researchers have discovered further proof that orangutans need large swaths of forests to survive. The study, recently published in the scientific journal Molecular Ecology, showed that the male orangutan would navigate much longer distances than the females and suggests changes are needed to ensure that males are able to move between suitable habitat patches.

Life Sciences - Environment - 30.04.2012
Ancient network of rivers and lakes found in Arabian Desert
Ancient network of rivers and lakes found in Arabian Desert
Satellite images have revealed that a network of ancient rivers once coursed their way through the sand of the Arabian Desert, leading scientists to believe that the region experienced wetter periods in the past. The images are the starting point for a major potentially ground-breaking research project led by the University of Oxford into human evolutionary heritage.

Life Sciences - Environment - 30.04.2012
24 new species discovered on Caribbean islands are close to extinction
24 new species discovered on Caribbean islands are close to extinction
In a single new scientific publication, 24 new species of lizards known as skinks, all from islands in the Caribbean, have been discovered and scientifically named. According to Blair Hedges, professor of biology at Penn State University and the leader of the research team, half of the newly added skink species already may be extinct or close to extinction, and all of the others on the Caribbean islands are threatened with extinction.

Health - Environment - 27.04.2012
Asian tiger mosquito alert
Research at the University has shown that future projections of Europe's climate could allow the Asian tiger mosquito to live in northern regions. The Asian tiger mosquito, originally from south-east Asia, is an invasive species with potential to transmit infectious disease, including dengue and chikungunya fever.

Chemistry - Environment - 26.04.2012
New study sheds light on debate over organic vs. conventional agriculture
Researchers at University of Minnesota's Institute on the Environment and McGill University call for combining best of both approaches MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (04/26/2012) —Can organic agriculture feed the world? Although organic techniques may not be able to do the job alone, they do have an important role to play in feeding a growing global population while minimizing environmental damage, according to researchers at the University of Minnesota's Institute on the Environment and McGill University.

Chemistry - Environment - 25.04.2012
New study sheds light on debate over organic vs. conventional agriculture
Researchers at McGill, Univ. of Minnesota call for combining best of both approaches Can organic agriculture feed the world? Although organic techniques may not be able to do the job alone, they do have an important role to play in feeding a growing global population while minimizing environmental damage, according to researchers at McGill University and the University of Minnesota.

Life Sciences - Environment - 23.04.2012
Wo unsere Schwalben den Winter verbringen
Seit Ende März werden es täglich mehr: Die Rückkehr der Schwalben ist jetzt in vollem Gang. Wo die Vögel den Winter verbracht haben, war bisher unbekannt.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.04.2012
Study suggests shale-gas development causing rapid landscape change
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. As the Marcellus natural-gas play unfolds in Pennsylvania, several trends are becoming increasingly clear, according to researchers at Penn State. First, most of the development is occurring on private land, and the greatest amount of development falls within the Susquehanna River basin.

Environment - 17.04.2012
Live fast, die young
New study shows urban plant communities have traits that make it harder for them to adapt to change than their countryside counterparts. MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (04/17/2012) —Cities harbor more plant species than rural areas. However, plant species of urban areas are more closely related to each other and often share similar functions.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.04.2012
Under a warm blanket of snow
Under a warm blanket of snow
Researchers are studying the effects of climate change on the degradation of organic matter in the soil. First results underline the importance of the thermal insulation provided by an intact layer of snow on the dynamics of soil microorganisms. You'd think that during the winter, all life trapped beneath a layer of snow would shut down and wait for warmer days.

Environment - 16.04.2012
Earlier relatives may have climbed out of family tree
Earlier relatives may have climbed out of family tree
It has long been believed that coming down from the trees was a crucial evolutionary shift. The behaviour of these chimpanzees suggests a more deep-seated, gradual transition." —Kathelijne Koops The first study into rarely-documented ground nest-building by wild chimpanzees has offered new clues about the ancient transition of early hominins - our "human-like" ancestors  – from sleeping in trees to sleeping on the ground.

Environment - Life Sciences - 13.04.2012
Scientists complete first-ever emperor penguin count from space
Scientists complete first-ever emperor penguin count from space
There are twice as many emperor penguins in Antarctica than was previously thought, according to a new study released today by an international team of researchers using high-resolution satellite mapping technology. This first-ever count of an entire species from space provides an important benchmark for monitoring the impact of environmental change on the population of this iconic bird.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.04.2012
Caterpillars more likely to vomit alone
A type of caterpillar which defends itself by regurgitating on its predators is less likely to do so when in groups than when alone, a new study by researchers from the University of Liverpool and the University of Bristol has found. Such reluctance is sufficient to cancel out the benefits of being in a group.

Life Sciences - Environment - 05.04.2012
Vomiting caterpillars weigh up costs and benefits of group living
Vomiting caterpillars weigh up costs and benefits of group living
A type of caterpillar which defends itself by regurgitating on its predators is less likely to do so when in groups than when alone, a new study by researchers from the University of Bristol and the University of Liverpool has found. Such reluctance is sufficient to cancel out the benefits of being in a group.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.04.2012
Ancient Egyptian cotton unveils secrets of domesticated crop evolution
Scientists studying 1,600-year-old cotton from the banks of the Nile have found what they believe is the first evidence that punctuated evolution has occurred in a major crop group within the relatively short history of plant domestication. The findings offer an insight into the dynamics of agriculture in the ancient world and could also help today's domestic crops face challenges such as climate change and water scarcity.

Environment - Administration - 30.03.2012
Assessing protected area effectiveness
Assessing protected area effectiveness
A new study published in Conservation Letters aims to measure whether parks and reserves in the tropics succeed in protecting forests Just as deforestation rates in remote protected areas should not be compared with deforestation rates from more accessible and lower altitude unprotected areas, it is also critical to control for government-mediated access in the form of regulations governing unprotected lands.
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