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Health - Life Sciences - 03.12.2012
Genes link growth in the womb with diseases in adulthood
Genes link growth in the womb with diseases in adulthood
Four new genetic regions that influence babies' birth weight have been identified by an international research team involving the University of Oxford. The findings provide further evidence that genes are important for growth in the womb, as well as the mother's nutrition. Together, the newly identified genetic regions have a surprisingly large effect on birth weight when compared with other known influences.

Health - Chemistry - 03.12.2012
BPA exposure in fetal livers
BPA exposure in fetal livers
ANN ARBOR-New research from the University of Michigan School of Public Health found BPA, or bisphenol A, in fetal liver tissue, demonstrating that there is considerable exposure to the chemical during pregnancy. Researchers also found a proportionately higher concentration of free BPA-as opposed to the conjugated forms modified by the body for elimination-further showing that in fetuses the ability to eliminate the chemical from the body is not the same as in adults.

Economics - Health - 03.12.2012
Only a third of us show a consistent approach to financial risk
Empirically rich new study finds most people alter their risk-management approach depending on the type of financial decision. Take a moment to consider some of the financial choices you've made in recent years. Do you have a consistent approach to your money, either by playing it safe or having a willingness to take risks?

Health - Mathematics - 03.12.2012
5.2 million to improve understanding of ageing immune system
A team of researchers from the University of Warwick, working with the University of Manchester, have been awarded 5.2 million to investigate our immune response and how it is affected by ageing. The grant is part of BBSRC 's Strategic Longer and Larger Awards scheme, which give world-leading teams the time and resources to address areas of key strategic importance.

Health - 03.12.2012
Treating childhood cancer in developing countries less expensive than believed
The assumption that childhood cancer in developing countries is prohibitively expensive to treat is challenged by new research contributed to by the University of Sydney. "Our findings mean it is time to re-evaluate global health policy," said Alexandra Martiniuk from the University's School of Public Health and The George Institute.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.12.2012
Genes link growth in the womb with adult metabolism and disease
Genes link growth in the womb with adult metabolism and disease
Researchers have identified four new genetic regions that influence birth weight, providing further evidence that genes as well as maternal nutrition are important for growth in the womb. Three of the regions are also linked to adult metabolism, helping to explain why smaller babies have higher rates of chronic diseases later in life.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.11.2012
Novel Studies of Gene Regulation in Brain Development May Mean New Treatment of Mental Disorders
Diagram showing the hierarchy of TFs and CGGs networks and the novel strategy of drug design based on hierarchical gene-TF network analysis. The blue squares are schizophrenia-related; the red squares are autism-related CGGs and TFs. Some CGGs and TFs are common for both disorders, while some are unique for each disorder.

Health - Computer Science - 30.11.2012
Researchers trying to get computers to see as humans do
Researchers trying to get computers to see as humans do
Madison, Wisconsin - How could a few pictures of a dog in the grass illustrate key concepts underlying computer vision, a sophisticated science aimed at teaching machines to perform visual tasks for humans - such as recognizing faces, objects and patterns? Vikas Singh , assistant professor of biostatistics and medical informatics at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, and graduate students Maxwell Collins and Jia Xu understand the relationship very well.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.11.2012
5.2M to improve understanding of aging immune system
The grant is part of BBSRC's Strategic Longer and Larger Awards scheme, which gives world-leading teams the time and resources to address areas of key strategic importance. The research focuses on a signalling system called 'NF-kappaB' which plays a key role in regulating how our immune system responds to diseases.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.11.2012
First direct evidence of tuberculosis transmission between cattle and badgers
Scientists at the University of Glasgow and the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute in Northern Ireland have established the first direct evidence that tuberculosis epidemics in badgers and cattle are related at a local scale. Using next-generation genome sequencing technology (NGS), the team from the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine were able to trace mutations in the bovine TB bacteria - Mycobacterium bovis - as it passed from animal to animal.

Health - 30.11.2012
New patient-friendly way to make stem cells for fight against heart disease
New patient-friendly way to make stem cells for fight against heart disease
We are excited to have developed a practical and efficient method to create stem cells from a cell type found in blood." —Dr Amer Rana, of the University of Cambridge's Department of Medicine Scientists have discovered a patient-friendly and efficient way to make stem cells out of blood, increasing the hope that scientists could one day use stem cells made from patients' own cells to treat cardiovascular disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.11.2012
Study Sheds Light on How Pancreatic Cancer Begins
A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is particularly devastating since the prognosis for recovery is usually poor, with the cancer most often not detected until late stages. Research led by scientists at the University of California, San Diego and UC San Francisco Schools of Medicine examined the tumor-initiating events leading to pancreatic cancer (also called pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma or PDA) in mice.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.11.2012
Study Helps Resolve Debate About How Tumors Spread
A team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has shown for the first time how cancer cells control the ON/OFF switch of a program used by developing embryos to effectively metastasize in vivo, breaking free and spreading to other parts of the body, where they can proliferate and grow into secondary tumors.

Health - 29.11.2012
Loss of gene expression may trigger cardiovascular disease
Loss of gene expression may trigger cardiovascular disease
A Yale-led team of researchers has uncovered a genetic malfunction that may lead to hardening of the arteries and other forms of cardiovascular disease. The study appears in the journal Cell Reports. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), which spur the formation of new tissue and cells, have also recently emerged as key regulators of the vascular system.

Health - Psychology - 28.11.2012
Scientists identify depression and anxiety biomarker in youths
Scientists identify depression and anxiety biomarker in youths
" Scientists have discovered a cognitive biomarker - a biological indicator of a disease - for young adolescents who are at high risk of developing depression and anxiety. Their The test for the unique cognitive biomarker, which can be done on a computer, could be used as an inexpensive tool to screen adolescents for common emotional mental illnesses.

Health - Career - 28.11.2012
Researcher predicts spike in computer-related injuries in medical workers
Researcher predicts spike in computer-related injuries in medical workers
As U.S. health care goes high tech, spurred by $20 billion in federal stimulus incentives, the widespread adoption of electronic medical records and related digital technologies is predicted to reduce errors, save time and lower costs. But it is also likely to significantly boost musculoskeletal injuries among doctors and nurses, concludes a Cornell ergonomics professor in two new papers.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 28.11.2012
Research indicates risks of consuming high fructose corn syrup
Research indicates risks of consuming high fructose corn syrup
A new study indicates that large amounts of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a sweetener found in national food supplies across the world, may be a contributory factor to the rising global epidemic of type 2 diabetes. The study by researchers from the University of Oxford and the University of Southern California reports that countries that use HFCS in their food supply had a 20 per cent higher prevalence of diabetes than countries that did not use HFCS.

Health - 28.11.2012
Common heart failure drugs could benefit more patients
Common heart failure drugs could benefit more patients
A novel study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden suggests that commonly used drugs to treat heart failure and high blood pressure may have a wider range of application than earlier known, and also can be used against so called HFPEF - a type of heart failure that until now has been impossible to treat.

Health - Psychology - 27.11.2012
New behavioral strategies may help patients learn to better control chronic diseases
One of the most important health problems in the United States is the failure of patients with chronic diseases to take their medications and do all that is necessary to control their illnesses. In a study published in the current Journal of General Internal Medicine, UCLA researchers and their colleagues suggest that physicians take a serious look at tools and strategies used in behavioral economics and social psychology to help motivate their patients to assert better control over chronic diseases.

Health - Chemistry - 27.11.2012
Enzyme explains angina in diabetics
In a new study published in the scientific journal Circulation, scientists at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital show that an enzyme called arginase might have a key part to play in the development of cardiovascular disease in patients who already have type II diabetes. According to the team, arginase prevents the formation of protective nitrogen oxide in the blood vessels, and treatments that inhibit this enzyme reduce the risk of angina in diabetics.