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Life Sciences - 15.12.2012
Bewährungsprobe für DNA-Nanotechnologie
Bewährungsprobe für DNA-Nanotechnologie
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Health - 14.12.2012
Schizophrenia linked to social inequality
Schizophrenia linked to social inequality
Our data seems to suggest that both absolute and relative levels of deprivation predict the incidence of schizophrenia." —James Kirkbride Higher rates of schizophrenia in urban areas can be attributed to increased deprivation, increased population density and an increase in inequality within a neighbourhood, new research reveals.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2012
New findings on killer bacteria’s defence
New research from Lund University casts new light on the interaction between the immune system and streptococcus bacteria, which cause both mild tonsillitis and serious infections such as sepsis and necrotising fasciitis. The way in which antibodies attach to the bacteria is linked to how serious the disease is.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 14.12.2012
Synchronized nanoscale oscillators may spur new devices
Synchronized nanoscale oscillators may spur new devices
Synchronization phenomena are everywhere in the physical world - from circadian rhythms to side-by-side pendulum clocks coupled mechanically through vibrations in the wall. Researchers have now demonstrated synchronization at the nanoscale, using only light, not mechanics. Two tiny mechanical oscillators, suspended just nanometers apart, can talk to each other and synchronize by means of nothing but light, according to new research published Dec.

Environment - 14.12.2012
Call to arms issued to scientists over energy policy
In the wake of the publication of the Energy Bill, experts from the Glasgow Media Group at the University of Glasgow and Chatham House are today calling on the scientific community to take a more decisive lead in the debate on energy policy. The recommendations aim to avoid the issue becoming mired in party politics and controversy, as has happened with climate change.

Astronomy / Space - 14.12.2012
Exploding star missing from formation of solar system
A new study published by University of Chicago researchers challenges the notion that the force of an exploding star prompted the formation of the solar system. In this study, published online last month in Earth and Planetary Science Letters , authors Haolan Tang and Nicolas Dauphas found the radioactive isotope iron 60 — the telltale sign of an exploding star—low in abundance and well mixed in solar system material.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.12.2012
Scientists Developing Quick Way to ID People Exposed to Ionizing Radiation
Scientists Developing Quick Way to ID People Exposed to Ionizing Radiation
There's a reason emergency personnel train for the aftermath of a dirty bomb or an explosion at a nuclear power plant. They'll be faced with a deluge of urgent tasks, such as identifying who's been irradiated, who has an injury-induced infection, and who's suffering from both. Unfortunately, there isn't a quick way to screen for people exposed to dangerous levels of radiation.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2012
A "paradigm shift" for cancer research
Scientists at the University of Toronto have discovered that genetic mutations - regarded by many as the chief cause of cancer growth - are only one piece of the puzzle. Biological factors and cell behaviour also drive tumour growth, contributing to therapy failure and relapse, said Professor John Dick of the Department of Molecular Genetics and Canada Research Chair in Stem Cell Biology.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2012
More than two hundred genes identified for Crohn's Disease
More than two hundred genes identified for Crohn’s Disease
More than two hundred gene locations have now been identified for the chronic bowel condition Crohn's Disease, in a study that analysed the entire human genome. Published today in The American Journal of Human Genetics , scientists at UCL have devised a new method for identifying and mapping gene locations for complex inherited diseases.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2012
Team solves mystery associated with DNA repair
Team solves mystery associated with DNA repair
CHAMPAIGN, lll. Every time a human or bacterial cell divides it first must copy its DNA. Specialized proteins unzip the intertwined DNA strands while others follow and build new strands, using the originals as templates. Whenever these proteins encounter a break - and there are many - they stop and retreat, allowing a new cast of molecular players to enter the scene.

Religions - 13.12.2012
Blue cheese gets its distinctive smell
As the nation prepares to tuck into mounds of Stilton this Christmas, researchers have pinpointed for the first time the yeast which helps give blue cheese its distinctive aroma. A study undertaken by academics at the Universities of Nottingham and Northampton has discovered a particular 'secondary microflora' component' is responsible for boosting the smell of blue cheese.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.12.2012
Team identifies successful combination drug therapies for melanoma mutations
Team identifies successful combination drug therapies for melanoma mutations
Yale Cancer Center researchers have identified several effective combinations of therapies that inhibit melanomas driven by two of the most formidable cancer genes. Some combinations include cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. The study appears in the journal Cancer Discovery. The Yale scientists were seeking to overcome the problems of resistance and partial response to single-drug cancer therapy in patients with melanoma.

Life Sciences - 13.12.2012
Pheromone helps mice remember where to find a mate
Pheromone helps mice remember where to find a mate
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found that male mice produce a pheromone that provokes females and competitor males to remember a preference for the place where the pheromone was previously encountered. Some animals, such as moths, use a sensitive tracking system to trace airborne sex pheromones to the source, while others, such as snakes, follow trails of pheromones left on the ground.

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 12.12.2012
Chemical analysis of sieve vessels reveals first cheese making in Northern Europe in the 6th millennium BC
Chemical analysis of sieve vessels reveals first cheese making in Northern Europe in the 6th millennium BC
The first unequivocal evidence that humans in prehistoric Northern Europe made cheese more than 7,000 years ago is described in research by an international team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, published today in Nature. By analysing fatty acids extracted from unglazed pottery pierced with small holes excavated from archaeological sites in Poland, the researchers showed that dairy products were processed in these ceramic vessels.

Environment - Life Sciences - 12.12.2012
Cloud forest trees drink water through their leaves
Cloud forest trees drink water through their leaves
Tropical montane cloud forest trees use more than their roots to take up water. They also drink water from clouds directly through their leaves, University of California, Berkeley, scientists have discovered. While this is an essential survival strategy in foggy but otherwise dry areas, the scientists say that the clouds the trees depend on are now disappearing due to climate change.

Astronomy / Space - Chemistry - 12.12.2012
Galaxies Near Cosmic Dawn
The colored squares in the main image outline the locations of the newly discovered galaxies. Enlarged views of each galaxy are shown in the black-and-white images. Each galaxy is labeled with the redshift (z), which measures how much a galaxy's light has been stretched by the universe's expansion. The galaxy observed at a redshift of 11.9 may be the distance-record breaker, seen as it appeared 380 million years after the Big Bang.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2012
Stanford experiment finds ulcer bug's weak point
Stanford experiment finds ulcer bug’s weak point
Stanford Report, December 12, 2012 SLAC's high-power X-rays have revealed a potential drug target in H. pylori , the ulcer-causing bacteria that infect half the world's population. In 1982, Australian scientists extracted bacteria from a person's stomach, grew them in a petri dish and identified them as the cause of ulcers and gastritis.

Astronomy / Space - 12.12.2012
“missing link” of black holes
The discovery of a bingeing black hole that is expelling powerful beams of material has shed new light on some of the brightest X-ray sources seen in other galaxies, according to new research led by Durham University. Using Earth-orbiting X-ray telescopes, including NASA's Swift and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton satellites, a large international team of astronomers watched as the X-ray emission from the black hole in our nearest neighbouring galaxy, Andromeda - found more than 2 million light years away - brightened and faded over the course of six months.

Environment - Life Sciences - 12.12.2012
Beaks show why 'sister' species don't live together
Beaks show why 'sister' species don't live together
A study of closely-related bird species has found that they do not coexist in the same region because they remain too ecologically similar and will out-compete each other, not because of geographical barriers or unsuitable habitats. Oxford University scientists examined 'sister' species - species that are each other's closest relatives - of the 'ovenbird' family from South America.

Physics - Chemistry - 12.12.2012
Ultra-short laser pulses control chemical processes
How can molecules be split in a controlled manner? A new experiment at the TU Vienna shows how research into ultra-short laser pulses can be combined with chemistry. Chemical reactions occur so quickly that it is completely impossible to observe their progress or to control them using conventional methods.