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Results 21 - 33 of 33.


Mathematics - Linguistics / Literature - 23.04.2012
Online tool can detect patterns in US election news coverage
Online tool can detect patterns in US election news coverage
The US presidential election dominates the global media every four years, with news articles, which are carefully analysed by commentators and campaign strategists, playing a major role in shaping voter opinion. Academics at the University of Bristol's Intelligent Systems Laboratory have developed an online tool, Election Watch, which analyses the content of news about the US election by the international media.

Health - Mathematics - 17.04.2012
Using maths to feed the world
In the race to breed better crops to feed the increasing world population, scientists at The University of Nottingham are using maths to find out how a vital plant hormone affects growth. Gibberellin is a hormone which plays a key part in development throughout the plant, from the root to the flowers and leaves.

History / Archeology - Mathematics - 13.04.2012
History Channel's Titanic documentary features UW engineers
History Channel’s Titanic documentary features UW engineers
A hundred years ago this Sunday, a luxury ocean liner billed as "unsinkable” hit an iceberg on its maiden voyage. The Titanic sank to the bottom of the North Atlantic, leaving more than 1,500 passengers and crew dead. On this weekend's centennial, many are revisiting the story of the disaster and trying to piece together how it happened.

Mathematics - 26.03.2012
Reintegration of work life remains an important issue for Canadian mothers and public policy
Study considers effects of motherhood on employment across generations of Canadian women Both childless women and mothers of an only child have seen their likelihood of re-entering the labour market after a first work interruption increase across generations, according to a new study. However, their rate of return into employment has grown significantly more than that of mothers of two or more children, whose rate has also increased but at a slower pace.

Health - Mathematics - 14.03.2012
Anti-smoking campaigns have saved over 800,000 lives
More than 800,000 lives were saved in the United States between 1975 and 2000 thanks to anti-smoking measures, according to a new study that used a Yale mathematical model to quantify for the first time the impact of anti-smoking measures on lung cancer. The authors also note that 2.5 million people who died from smoking-related lung cancer in this same period might have survived if stricter tobacco control measures had been in effect.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 22.02.2012
Ant colonies remember rivals’ odour and compete like sports fans
A new study led by the University of Melbourne has shown that weaver ants share a collective memory for the odour of ants in rival nests, and use the information to identify them and compete, similar to how sports fans know each other instantly by their unique colours. The ant colony collective memory gives them an edge in a competitive world by priming all nest mates with information about rivals before they encounter them, said study leader Professor Mark Elgar from the University's Department of Zoology.

Mathematics - 20.02.2012
The beat goes on: the geometry that makes music pleasing
Researchers uncover mathematical formula for rhythm and suggest our brains may be hardwired to respond to it Whether it's Bach or Brubeck, a new study shows that composers repeat rhythmic patterns in their works in such a way that the part is a copy of the larger whole. A research team led by neuroscientists Drs.

Physics - Mathematics - 13.02.2012
Rapunzel, Leonardo and the physics of the ponytail
New research provides the first mathematical understanding of the shape of a ponytail and could have implications for the textile industry, computer animation and personal care products. From Leonardo Da Vinci to the Brothers Grimm, the properties of hair have been of enduring interest in science and art.

Physics - Mathematics - 13.02.2012
Rapunzel, Leonardo and the physics of the ponytail
Rapunzel, Leonardo and the physics of the ponytail
New research provides the first mathematical understanding of the shape of a ponytail and could have implications for the textile industry, computer animation and personal care products. Our findings solve a problem that has puzzled scientists and artists ever since Leonardo da Vinci remarked on the fluid-like streamlines of hair in his notebooks 500 years ago." —Professor Ray Goldstein From Leonardo Da Vinci to the Brothers Grimm, the properties of hair have been of enduring interest in science and art.

Mathematics - Administration - 08.02.2012
Statistical model may unlock fingerprint evidence in court
Statistical model may unlock fingerprint evidence in court
An assistant professor at Penn State has created a new statistical model that may enable fingerprint evidence to withstand greater scrutiny in court. Currently, some fingerprints that could be key pieces of evidence in court are not being considered because of shortcomings in the way this evidence is reported.

Mathematics - 07.02.2012
Early warning signals for critical transitions
Early warning signals for critical transitions
The world can deliver sudden and nasty shocks. Economies can crash, fisheries can collapse, and climate can pass tipping points. Providing ample warning of such transitions presently requires the collection of enormous - and often prohibitive - amounts of data. A new method developed by Thilo Gross , Senior Lecturer in Engineering Mathematic's at the University of Bristol and Steven Lade from the Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Germany promises to change this.

Mathematics - Psychology - 18.01.2012
Poor self-image cannot explain maths gender gap
Poor self-image cannot explain maths gender gap
Studies showing that women's underachievement in maths is due to their own poor self-image are fundamentally flawed, according to psychologists Gijsbert Stoet, from the University of Leeds, and Professor David Geary from the University of Missouri. Their findings suggest that recent strategies aimed at improving girls' performance in maths - which are based on these studies - are misguided and unlikely to work.

Mathematics - 12.01.2012
Bowlers strike with a hot hand, too
Is the so-called "hot hand" phenomenon in sports a reality or just an illusion based on misperception of random sequences? For the second time in recent months, a Yale study supports the notion that it is real. The study appears online in the journal PLoS One. The "hot hand" phenomenon refers to the belief that an athlete is more likely to make successful shots if the previous shots were successful.