news 2013


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Results 2401 - 2420 of 2487.


Social Sciences - 15.01.2013
Violent video games may intensify anti-Arab stereotypes
ANN ARBOR-Playing violent video games about terrorism strengthens negative stereotypes about Arabs, even when Arabs are not portrayed in the games. That is one of the findings of an innovative new study in the January issue of Psychology of Violence, a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Psychological Association.

Chemistry - Physics - 15.01.2013
Chemistry resolves toxic concerns about carbon nanotubes
Chemistry resolves toxic concerns about carbon nanotubes
Safety fears about carbon nanotubes, due to their structural similarity to asbestos, have been alleviated following research showing that reducing their length removes their toxic properties. In a new study, published today in the journal Angewandte Chemie, evidence is provided that the asbestos-like reactivity and pathogenicity reported for long, pristine nanotubes can be completely alleviated if their surface is modified and their effective length is reduced as a result of chemical treatment.

Social Sciences - 15.01.2013
Violent video games intensify anti-Arab stereotypes
ANN ARBOR-Playing violent video games about terrorism strengthens negative stereotypes about Arabs, even when Arabs are not portrayed in the games. That is one of the findings of an innovative new study in the January issue of Psychology of Violence, a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Psychological Association.

Health - 14.01.2013
Penn Medicine Study of Breast Cancer Message Boards Finds Frequent Discussion of Drug Side Effects, Discontinuation of Therapy
In the first study to examine discussion of drug side effects on Internet message boards, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that breast cancer survivors taking the commonly prescribed adjuvant therapy known as aromatase inhibitors (AIs) often detailed in these forums troublesome symptoms resulting from the drugs, and they were apt to report discontinuing the treatment or switching to a different drug in the same class.

Environment - 14.01.2013
Tough limits on global greenhouse gas emissions could reduce some climate change damage by two-thirds
Tough limits on global greenhouse gas emissions could reduce some climate change damage by two-thirds Tough limits on global emissions of greenhouse gases could avoid 20 to 65% of the damaging effects of climate change by 2100 according to new research involving experts from The University of Nottingham and led by the University of Reading's Walker Institute.

Psychology - Economics / Business - 14.01.2013
If we go over the fiscal cliff, will people spend or save?
News Release Research from U of M Associate Professor of Marketing Vlad Griskevicius suggests childhood environments may hold the key Media Note: The APS journal Psychological Science is the highest ranked empirical journal in psychology. For a copy of the article "When the Economy Falters, Do People Spend or Save? Responses to Resource Scarcity Depend on Childhood Environments" and access to other Psychological Science research findings, please Anna Mikulak at 202-293-9300 or amikulak [a] psychologicalscience (p) org.

Health - Continuing Education - 14.01.2013
Simple intervention helps doctors communicate better when prescribing medications
When it comes to prescribing medications to their patients, physicians could use a dose of extra training, according to a new study led by a UCLA researcher. In previous studies, Derjung Tarn and her colleagues found that when doctors prescribed medicines, the information they provided to patients was spotty at best , they rarely addressed the cost of medications and they didn't adequately monitor their patients' medication adherence .

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 14.01.2013
Diet may not impact certain health outcomes in older persons
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Eating diets high in sugar and fat may not affect the health outcomes of older adults ages 75 and up, suggesting that placing people of such advanced age on overly restrictive diets to treat their excess weight or other conditions may have little benefit, according to researchers at Penn State and Geisinger Healthcare System.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 14.01.2013
Research Update: Atomic Motions Help Determine Temperatures Inside Earth
In December 2011, Caltech mineral-physics expert Jennifer Jackson reported that she and a team of researchers had used diamond-anvil cells to compress tiny samples of iron-the main element of the earth's core. By squeezing the samples to reproduce the extreme pressures felt at the core, the team was able to get a closer estimate of the melting point of iron. At the time, the measurements that the researchers made were unprecedented in detail.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 14.01.2013
Growing evidence of global warming threat to future food supplies
Increasingly hot summer weather could cause a fall in crop yields over the next two decades unless farming techniques are improved more quickly, scientists at the University have found. High temperatures are having an increasingly damaging effect on maize (sweetcorn) in France – the largest supplier of the crop to the UK – which may explain a recent slowdown in the trend towards higher yields, according to researchers at the Universities of Leeds, Reading and Exeter.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 14.01.2013
Childhood obesity linked to more immediate health problems than previously thought
Childhood obesity linked to more immediate health problems than previously thought
While a great deal of research on childhood obesity has spotlighted the long-term health problems that emerge in adulthood, a new UCLA study focuses on the condition's immediate consequences and shows that obese youngsters are at far greater risk than had been supposed. Compared to kids who are not overweight, obese children are at nearly twice the risk of having three or more reported medical, mental or developmental conditions, the UCLA researchers found.

Chemistry - 14.01.2013
Gas that triggers ozone destruction
Scientists at the Universities of Leeds and York have discovered that the majority of ozone-depleting iodine oxide observed over the remote ocean comes from a previously unknown marine source. The research team found that the principal source of iodine oxide can be explained by emissions of hypoiodous acid (HOI) – a gas not yet considered as being released from the ocean – along with a contribution from molecular iodine (I2).

Computer Science - 14.01.2013
Bessere Diagnose von Erkrankungen des Energiestoffwechsels
Bessere Diagnose von Erkrankungen des Energiestoffwechsels
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Life Sciences - 14.01.2013
Reassembling the backbone of life using a particle accelerator
Reassembling the backbone of life using a particle accelerator
The results of this study force us to re-write the textbook on backbone evolution in the earliest limbed animals" —Stephanie Pierce Research published today (Sunday 13 January 2013) in the journal Nature documents, for the first time, the intricate three-dimensional structure of the backbone in the earliest four-legged animals (tetrapods).

Health - Chemistry - 14.01.2013
The secrets of a tadpole's tail and the implications for human healing
The secrets of a tadpole’s tail and the implications for human healing
It is generally appreciated that frogs and salamanders have remarkable regenerative capacities, in contrast to mammals, including humans. For example, if a tadpole loses its tail a new one will regenerate within a week. For several years Enrique Amaya and his team at The Healing Foundation Centre in the Faculty of Life Sciences have been trying to better understand the regeneration process, in the hope of eventually using this information to find new therapies that will improve the ability of humans to heal and regenerate better.

Physics - Chemistry - 14.01.2013
Graphene plasmonics beats the drug cheats
Graphene plasmonics beats the drug cheats
Writing , the scientists, working with colleagues from Aix-Marseille University , have created a device which potentially can see one molecule though a simple optical system and can analyse its components within minutes. This uses plasmonics – the study of vibrations of electrons in different materials.

Philosophy - Health - 11.01.2013
Scholars call for new ethical guidelines to direct research on social networking
The unique data collection capabilities of social networking and online gaming websites require new ethical guidance from federal regulators concerning online research involving adolescent subjects, an ethics scholar from the Morgridge Institute for Research and a computer and learning sciences expert from Tufts University argue .

- 11.01.2013
Research uncovers seven lost Burns manuscripts
A Scottish researcher has unearthed seven long lost manuscripts, including correspondence between Robert Burns and his close friends, which throw significant new light on the life and work of the poet. The manuscripts are believed among some of the most important findings concerning Burns in recent years, and this research offers academics and scholars new resources through which to study his life and works.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2013
The secret sex life of the penicillin-producing fungus could make it more productive
New and more effective strains of the fungus used to produce penicillin could be developed after a team of international scientists unearthed the secret sex life of Sir Alexander Fleming's fungus Penicillium chrysogenum (P. chrysogenum). The scientists from The University of Nottingham , Ruhr-University Bochum, The University of Göttingen, and Sandoz GmbH have announced a major breakthrough in our understanding of the sex life of the fungus P. chrysogenum.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2013
Manipulating the Schmallemberg virus genome to understand how it causes disease
Scottish researchers have developed methods to synthesize and change the genome of a recently discovered virus, in a bid to understand how it induces disease among livestock such as cattle, sheep and goats. The research, led by Massimo Palmarini and Alain Kohl at the MRC Centre for Virus Research at the University of Glasgow, has laid bare important ways by which the Schmallenberg virus (SBV) causes disease and has paved the way for future development of new vaccines.