news 2013


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Results 2441 - 2460 of 2487.


Health - Life Sciences - 08.01.2013
McGill launches major study on prevention of HPV
A new study by McGill University's Division of Cancer Epidemiology will test a revolutionary way of preventing the transmission of the human papillomavirus (HPV) through the use of a topical gel applied during sexual activity. The study - called CATCH, an acronym for Carrageenan-gel Against Transmission of Cervical HPV - is a double-blind randomized controlled trial involving over 450 women, each of whom will receive either an active gel containing a specific type of sea algae extract commonly referred to as carrageenan or a placebo gel.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.01.2013
Gene testing asthmatic children could lead to better treatment
Gene testing asthmatic children could lead to better treatment
Testing asthmatic children for a specific gene could prevent their condition worsening, according to new research by scientists at the Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) and the University of Dundee. There are two main treatments for asthma: 'preventers' and 'relievers'. The genotype is carried by one in seven sufferers and the research found their condition could be aggravated by the use of the reliever medicine, Salmeterol.

Life Sciences - 08.01.2013
Genes and obesity: Fast food isn't only culprit in expanding waistlines -- DNA is also to blame
Genes and obesity: Fast food isn’t only culprit in expanding waistlines -- DNA is also to blame
Researchers at UCLA say it's not just what you eat that makes those pants tighter — it's also genetics. In a new study, scientists discovered that body-fat responses to a typical fast-food diet are determined in large part by genetic factors, and they have identified several genes they say may control those responses.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.01.2013
Blood brothers (and sisters): U-M sibling study discovers genetic region linked to control of key blood-clotting protein
Blood brothers (and sisters): U-M sibling study discovers genetic region linked to control of key blood-clotting protein
ANN ARBOR-In 2006, the lab of David Ginsburg at the Life Sciences Institute put a call out for siblings attending the University of Michigan to donate blood for a study of blood-clotting disorders. The samples were collected over three years and have now enabled the researchers to identify the specific parts of the genome responsible for levels of a key substance for blood clotting.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.01.2013
Tiny tools help advance medical discoveries
MIT researchers are designing tools to analyze cells at the microscale. With the recent launch of MIT's Institute for Medical Engineering and Science , MIT News examines research with the potential to reshape medicine and health care through new scientific knowledge, novel treatments and products, better management of medical data, and improvements in health-care delivery.

Health - Psychology - 08.01.2013
Family thought to play part in reducing stress for young Mexicans, study shows
Family thought to play part in reducing stress for young Mexicans, study shows
Marcela Raffaelli, a professor of human and community development at Illinois, is one of the co-authors on a study that found that families play a unique and powerful role in meeting the mental health needs of Mexican youth, especially during periods of stress. Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, Ill.

Health - Electroengineering - 08.01.2013
Researchers identify new target for common heart condition
Researchers identify new target for common heart condition
Researchers have found new evidence that metabolic stress can increase the onset of atrial arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation (AF), a common heart condition that causes an irregular and often abnormally fast heart rate. The findings may pave the way for the development of new therapies for the condition which can be expected to affect almost one in four of the UK population at some point in their lifetime.

Health - Administration - 08.01.2013
Perceived benefits of joint commissioning lag behind reality, new study shows
A major new report on joint commissioning in health and social care has found the perceived benefits of collaborative working, such as efficiency savings and improvements to services, often lagged behind the reality. The study, carried out by professors at the University of Birmingham for the National Institute of Health Research, warns that new financial pressures will make joint commissioning and joint working even harder in the future.

Agronomy / Food Science - 08.01.2013
Body weight and gender influence judgment in the courtroom
Body weight and gender influence judgment in the courtroom
In a study that offers insight into the depth of stigmatization of overweight and obese people, researchers at the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity found that weight stigma extends to the courtroom. Published online in the International Journal of Obesity, the study shows that a defendant's body weight and gender impact jurors' perceptions of guilt and responsibility.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.01.2013
Overactive brain keeps autistic teens from adjusting to social situations
ANN ARBOR-A new University of Michigan study finds that an overactive part of the brain hinders autistic teens from coping in unfamiliar social settings, leaving them feeling overwhelmed and anxious. Seeing the same faces repeatedly can negatively affect autistic children, especially in social situations.

Life Sciences - 08.01.2013
How sperm swim near surfaces
How sperm swim near surfaces
" Interactions between swimming cells and surfaces feature prominently in a wide range of microbiological processes, most importantly in the formation of bacterial films and during the fertilisation of the human egg. Yet, surprisingly little has been known about the physical mechanisms that govern the accumulation of microbes at surfaces.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 08.01.2013
Microswimmers hit the wall
Microswimmers hit the wall
" The results of a study published today (7 January) suggest that microbes 'feel' their way along a solid surface, much as a blindfolded person would move near a wall. Using high-speed microscopic imaging, University of Cambridge researchers have found that sperm cells accumulate at surfaces and algae move away from them as a result of between the surface and the cells' flagella or cilia - the hair-like appendages that propel cells through their fluid environment.

Health - 08.01.2013
Centralisation to fewer surgeons results in better survival after oesophageal cancer surgery
Patients who undergo surgery for oesophageal cancer have a much greater chance of long term survival if the operation is carried out by a surgeon who has performed this particular operation many times before. This according to a new, large-scale study conducted by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, which is published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Health - Psychology - 08.01.2013
Mums may influence babies’ pain at routine vaccinations
Babies of first-time mums express more pain during routine vaccinations than those of experienced mothers, according to new research. The Durham University study suggests that first-time mothers' anxiety about the procedure has an effect on their babies. The researchers say babies' early experience of pain shapes their response to painful events later in life so reduction of anxiety in both mother and baby is important.

Health - Chemistry - 07.01.2013
3D colour X-Ray imaging improved for identifying contraband, corrosion or cancer
3D colour X-Ray imaging improved for identifying contraband, corrosion or cancer
Its ability to identify the composition of the scanned object could radically improve security screening at airports, medical imaging, aircraft maintenance, industrial inspection and geophysical exploration. The X-Ray system developed by Robert Cernik and colleagues from The School of Materials can identify chemicals and compounds such as cocaine, semtex, precious metals or radioactive materials even when they're contained inside a relatively large object like a suitcase.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2013
Cheap and easy technique to snip DNA could revolutionize gene therapy
Cheap and easy technique to snip DNA could revolutionize gene therapy
A simple, precise and inexpensive method for cutting DNA to insert genes into human cells could transform genetic medicine, making routine what now are expensive, complicated and rare procedures for replacing defective genes in order to fix genetic disease or even cure AIDS. Discovered last year by Jennifer Doudna and Martin Jinek of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and University of California, Berkeley, and Emmanuelle Charpentier of the Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine-Sweden, the technique was labeled a "tour de force" in a 2012 review.

Health - 07.01.2013
Costly breast cancer screenings don't add up to better outcomes
Costly breast cancer screenings don’t add up to better outcomes
Even though Medicare spends over $1 billion per year on breast cancer screenings such as a mammography, there is no evidence that higher spending benefits older women, researchers at Yale School of Medicine found in a study published Online First by JAMA Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.01.2013
Healthy BMI levels, physical activity linked to endometrial cancer survival
Healthy BMI levels, physical activity linked to endometrial cancer survival
Higher body mass index (BMI) and physical inactivity are associated with more than a two-fold increase in risk for mortality among women with endometrial cancer, new research by the Yale School of Public Health has found. The study appears in the current issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2013
New blood group system discovered by Swedish researchers
When giving blood transfusions, it is essential to take different blood groups into account. ABO and Rh are just two of many blood group systems; now a new one has been added. The system, which is the first one to have been discovered in Sweden, has been mapped by researchers at Lund University and Gothenburg University.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.01.2013
Cellular fuel gauge may restrict cancer growth
Researchers at McGill University have discovered that a key regulator of energy metabolism in cancer cells known as the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) may play a crucial role in restricting cancer cell growth. AMPK acts as a "fuel gauge" in cells; AMPK is turned on when it senses changes in energy levels, and helps to change metabolism when energy levels are low, such as during exercise or when fasting.