news 2013


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Results 2461 - 2480 of 2487.


Social Sciences - 07.01.2013
New ¤675,000 study will examine online abuse in teenage relationships
New ¤675,000 study will examine online abuse in teenage relationships
The role of online technology in instigating and maintaining control and violence in young people's intimate relationships will be examined in a new study led by researchers at the University of Bristol. Instant messaging and social networking sites are some of the most popular ways young people communicate today.

Astronomy / Space Science - Career - 07.01.2013
Within 'habitable zone,' more planets than we knew
Within ’habitable zone,’ more planets than we knew
The number of known places in our galaxy theoretically hospitable to life may be significantly greater than previously thought, according to new research. Researchers with Planet Hunters are reporting the discovery of a Jupiter-sized planet in the so-called "habitable zone" of a star similar to Earth's sun, as well as the identification of 15 new candidate planets also orbiting within their star's habitable zone.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 07.01.2013
Mountains Are Only Minor Contributors to Sediment Erosion and Climate Regulation
Mountains Are Only Minor Contributors to Sediment Erosion and Climate Regulation
Though churning smokestacks, cud-chewing cows and gasoline-burning vehicles are contributing constantly to greenhouse gas emissions, there are also many processes that do the reverse, pulling molecules like carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. One of these is chemical weathering, which occurs when rock turns into soil.

Life Sciences - 07.01.2013
New stem cell approach for blindness successful in mice
New stem cell approach for blindness successful in mice
Blind mice can see again, after Oxford University researchers transplanted developing cells into their eyes and found they could re-form the entire light-sensitive layer of the retina. Videos show the nocturnal mice, which once didn't notice the difference between light and dark at all, now run from the light and prefer to be in the dark - just like mice with normal vision.

Astronomy / Space Science - 07.01.2013
'Traffic jam' of moons in habitable zone
'Traffic jam' of moons in habitable zone
Volunteers from the Planethunters.org website, part of the Oxford University-led Zooniverse project, have discovered 15 new planet candidates orbiting in the habitable zones of other stars. Added to the 19 similar planets already discovered in habitable zones, where the temperature is neither too hot nor too cold for liquid water, the new finds suggest that there may be a 'traffic jam' of all kinds of strange worlds in regions that could potentially support life.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.01.2013
International study suggests human genes influence gut microbial composition
New research led by the Karolinska Instituet, Sweden and the University of Glasgow, Scotland, has identified a link between a human gene and the composition of human gastrointestinal bacteria. In a study published as a letter to the journal Gut today, the team outline new evidence suggesting that the human genome may play a role in determining the makeup of the billions of microbes in the human gastrointestinal tract collectively known as the gut microbiota.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2013
New compound overcomes drug-resistant Staph infection in mice
New compound overcomes drug-resistant Staph infection in mice
University of Illinois chemistry professor Eric Oldfield, center, graduate student Wei Zhu, left, research scientist Yonghui Zhang and their colleagues at UC San Diego discovered a compound that cured drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice. Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, lll.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2013
'Science' names University of Minnesota researcher's gene-modification technique one of 2012's top scientific breakthroughs
'Science' names University of Minnesota researcher's gene-modification technique one of 2012's top scientific breakthroughs
News Release Media Note: For a high-resolution image of Daniel Voytas, please Matt Hodson ( mjhodson [a] umn (p) edu ) or Stephanie Xenos ( sxenos [a] umn (p) edu ). MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (01/07/2013) —An approach to modify genes developed by University of Minnesota researcher Daniel Voytas and colleagues was among the "breakthroughs of the year" detailed in a special issue of Science published December 21.

Health - Administration - 06.01.2013
Black and Hispanic Patients Less Likely to Complete Substance Abuse Treatment than White Patients
Roughly half of all black and Hispanic patients who enter publicly funded alcohol treatment programs do not complete treatment, compared to 62 percent of white patients, according to a new study from a team of researchers including the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Comparable disparities were also identified for drug treatment program completion rates.

Health - 06.01.2013
Untreated Parkinson's Disease Patients No More Likely to Have Impulse Control Disorders
While approximately one in five Parkinson's disease patients experience impulse control disorder symptoms, the disease itself does not increase the risk of gambling, shopping, or other impulsivity symptoms, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.01.2013
Most-Used Diabetes Drug Works in Different Way than Previously Thought
Most-Used Diabetes Drug Works in Different Way than Previously Thought
A team, led by senior author Morris J. Birnbaum, MD, PhD , the Willard and Rhoda Ware Professor of Medicine, with the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism , Perelman School of Medicine , University of Pennsylvania, found that the diabetes drug metformin works in a different way than previously understood.

Astronomy / Space Science - Health - 06.01.2013
Penn Medicine: Simulated Mission to Mars Reveals Critical Data About Astronauts' Sleep and Activity Needs
Penn Medicine: Simulated Mission to Mars Reveals Critical Data About Astronauts' Sleep and Activity Needs
In the first study of its kind, a team of researchers led by faculty at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Baylor College of Medicine, has analyzed data on the impact of prolonged operational confinement on sleep, performance, and mood in astronauts from a groundbreaking international effort to simulate a 520-day space mission to Mars.

Environment - Mathematics - 06.01.2013
A new approach to assessing future sea level rise from ice sheets
A new approach to assessing future sea level rise from ice sheets
Future sea level rise due to the melting of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets could be substantially larger than estimated in Climate Change 2007, the Fourth Assessment Report of the IPCC, according to new research from the University of Bristol.

Health - Mathematics - 04.01.2013
McGill honoured again in Québec Science’s breakthroughs of the year
The achievements of McGill researchers were again recognized in Québec Science's annual selection of the top discoveries, with two McGill-led breakthroughs making the top 10 list for 2012. Moreover, McGill ranked first among all Quebec universities for the number of discoveries featured in the magazine's annual roundup since it was created 20 years ago.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 04.01.2013
Dinosaur shook tail feathers for mating show
Dinosaur shook tail feathers for mating show
A University of Alberta researcher's examination of fossilized dinosaur tail bones has led to a breakthrough finding: some feathered dinosaurs used tail plumage to attract mates, much like modern-day peacocks and turkeys. U of A paleontology researcher Scott Persons followed a chain of fossil evidence that started with a peculiar fusing together of vertebrae at the tip of the tail of four different species of dinosaurs, some separated in time and evolution by 45 million years.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.01.2013
Study suggests effect of fructose on brain may promote overeating
Study suggests effect of fructose on brain may promote overeating
The brain processes fructose and glucose, the two forms of simple sugars, differently - impacting appetite, feelings of satisfaction, fullness, and potential weight gain, according to a study by Yale School of Medicine researchers published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Glucose, but not fructose, suppresses brain activity in regions that promote the desire to eat, whereas fructose feeding may promote overeating through its inability to effectively suppress food-seeking behavior, the scientists found.

Health - 03.01.2013
New strategies needed to encourage male cancer survivors to consider future fertility
New strategies needed to encourage male cancer survivors to consider future fertility
New strategies are needed to encourage men who have banked sperm prior to cancer treatment to engage with ongoing fertility monitoring programmes, researchers from the University of Sheffield have found. Pioneering research presented at the Fertility 2013 conference today (Thursday 3 January 2013) shows that a large proportion of male cancer patients are missing out on appropriate fertility advice.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.01.2013
Pesticides and Parkinson's: UCLA researchers uncover further proof of a link
Pesticides and Parkinson’s: UCLA researchers uncover further proof of a link
For several years, neurologists at UCLA have been building a case that a link exists between pesticides and Parkinson's disease. To date, paraquat, maneb and ziram — common chemicals sprayed in California's Central Valley and elsewhere — have been tied to increases in the disease , not only among farmworkers but in individuals who simply lived or worked near fields and likely inhaled drifting particles.

Chemistry - 03.01.2013
Worms hijack development to foster cannibalism when needed
Worms hijack development to foster cannibalism when needed
Conventional wisdom holds that genes determine the shape and structure (morphology) of animals, but something else may be at play. A new study shows that a roundworm ( P. pacificus) regulates its offspring's morphology by using a potent cocktail of small-molecule signals. Exposure to trace quantities of these chemically unusual molecules can turn genetically identical juveniles into very different types of adults.

Health - 03.01.2013
Cognitive behavioral therapy adds no value to drug treatment for opioid dependence
Cognitive behavioral therapy adds no value to drug treatment for opioid dependence
In a surprise finding, Yale researchers report that adding cognitive behavioral therapy to the most commonly used drug treatment for opioid dependence does not further reduce illicit drug use by patients. The study, which could change how such dependence is viewed and treated in the U.S. healthcare system, appears online in the American Journal of Medicine.