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Results 21 - 40 of 206.


Physics - Chemistry - 18.11.2013
Two for one in solar power
A process that could revolutionise solar energy harvesting has been efficiently demonstrated in solution for the first time. We are only beginning to understand how this process works, and as we learn more we expect improvements in the technology to follow Brian Walker Solar cells offer the opportunity to harvest abundant, renewable energy.

Chemistry - Physics - 16.11.2013
Stanford and SLAC scientists invent self-healing battery electrode
Stanford and SLAC scientists invent self-healing battery electrode
A team of Stanford and SLAC scientists has made the first battery electrode that heals itself, opening a potentially commercially viable path for making the next generation of lithium ion batteries for electric cars, cell phones and other devices. Researchers have made the first battery electrode that heals itself, opening a new and potentially commercially viable path for making the next generation of lithium ion batteries for electric cars, cell phones and other devices.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 15.11.2013
SlipChip Counts Molecules with Chemistry and a Cell Phone
SlipChip Counts Molecules with Chemistry and a Cell Phone
In developing nations, rural areas, and even one's own home, limited access to expensive equipment and trained medical professionals can impede the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Many qualitative tests that provide a simple "yes" or "no" answer (like an at-home pregnancy test) have been optimized for use in these resource-limited settings.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 13.11.2013
Lignin-Feasting Microbe Holds Promise for Biofuels
Lignin-Feasting Microbe Holds Promise for Biofuels
Nature designed lignin, the tough woody polymer in the walls of plant cells, to bind and protect the cellulose sugars that plants use for energy. For this reason, lignin is a major challenge for those who would extract those same plant sugars and use them to make advanced biofuels. As part of their search for economic ways to overcome the lignin challenge, researchers at the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) have characterized the enzymatic activity of a rain forest microbe that breaks down lignin essentially by breathing it.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 13.11.2013
How the echidna lost its venom
13 November 2013 The function of a spur on the hind leg of echidnas has been revealed by research at the University of Sydney. Male platypuses and echidnas both secrete from a spur in their hind leg. In platypuses the spur injects venom into competitors causing pain and swelling but the purpose of the echidna spur and secreted substance has been unclear.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 13.11.2013
Better batteries through biology?
MIT researchers find a way to boost lithium-air battery performance, with the help of modified viruses. Lithium-air batteries have become a hot research area in recent years: They hold the promise of drastically increasing power per battery weight, which could lead, for example, to electric cars with a much greater driving range.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 07.11.2013
Before cells, biochemicals may have combined in clay
Before cells, biochemicals may have combined in clay
Clay - a seemingly infertile blend of minerals - might have been the birthplace of life on Earth. Or at least of the complex biochemicals that make life possible, Cornell biological engineers report in the Nov. 7 online issue of the journal Scientific Reports, published by Nature Publishing. "We propose that [in early geological history] clay hydrogel provided a confinement function for biomolecules and biochemical reactions," said Dan Luo, professor of biological and environmental engineering and a member of the Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 07.11.2013
Solving chromosomes’ structure
Scientists find that loops of DNA are key to tightly packing genetic material for cell division. Scientists first discovered chromosomes in the late 1800s, after the light microscope was invented. Using these microscopes, biologist Walter Flemming observed many tightly wound, elongated structures in cell nuclei.

Chemistry - Physics - 06.11.2013
Big beats bolster solar cell efficiency
Playing pop and rock music improves the performance of solar cells, according to new research from scientists at Queen Mary University of London and Imperial College London. The high frequencies and pitch found in pop and rock music cause vibrations that enhanced energy generation in solar cells containing a cluster of 'nanorods', leading to a 40 per cent increase in efficiency of the solar cells.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 31.10.2013
Gaming technology unravels one of the most complex entities in nature
31 Oct 2013 BBSRC-funded researchers at the University of Manchester's Institute of Biotechnology have used the power of off-the-shelf computer gaming technology to capture previously unobservable atomic movements. The research is helping to chart one of nature's most complex entities known as 'glycomes' – the entire complement of carbohydrates within a cell.

Health - Chemistry - 30.10.2013
Scientists modify BOTOX for the treatment of pain
Scientists modify BOTOX for the treatment of pain
Modified Botox could be used for the treatment of chronic pain and epilepsy A single injection could relieve pain for months Research could improve the quality of life for people who suffer from chronic pain conditions Scientists have manufactured a new bio-therapeutic molecule that could be used to treat neurological disorders such as chronic pain and epilepsy.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 28.10.2013
Proteins in their natural habitat
Proteins in their natural habitat
Proteins which reside in the membrane of cells play a key role in many biological processes and provide targets for more than half of current drug treatments. These membrane proteins are notoriously difficult to study in their natural environment, but scientists at the University of Oxford have now developed a technique to do just that, combining the use of sophisticated nanodiscs and mass spectrometers.

Physics - Chemistry - 28.10.2013
New material for quantum computing discovered out of the blue
New material for quantum computing discovered out of the blue
A common blue pigment used in the 5 note could have an important role to play in the development of a quantum computer, according to a paper published today in the journal Nature . The pigment, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), which is similar to the light harvesting section of the chlorophyll molecule, is a low-cost organic semiconductor that is found in many household products.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 24.10.2013
New research gives insight into how “Living Stones” adapt to extreme conditions
Research by scientists at the University of Sheffield has given new insight on how some plants adapt to extreme conditions which could help in the future development of efficient crops. The study was carried out on plants native to southern Africa known as "Living Stones", or Lithops. These little succulents survive in the blazing deserts and rocky ground of southern Africa by blending in with surrounding pebbles to avoid being eaten and by burying themselves underground.

Health - Chemistry - 23.10.2013
Insights into how TB tricks the immune system could help combat the disease
Insights into how TB tricks the immune system could help combat the disease
Researchers have identified a potential way to manipulate the immune system to improve its ability to fight off tuberculosis (TB). TB is a major problem for both humans and cattle and the new findings could help scientists to create better drugs to combat the disease in both. The disease is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which infects the lungs.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 20.10.2013
Physical cues help mature cells revert into embryonic-like stem cells
Physical cues help mature cells revert into embryonic-like stem cells
Bioengineers at UC Berkeley have shown that physical cues can replace certain chemicals when nudging mature cells back to a pluripotent stage, capable of becoming any cell type in the body. The researchers grew fibroblasts - cells taken from human skin and mouse ears - on surfaces with parallel grooves measuring 10 micrometers wide and 3 micrometers high.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 17.10.2013
Enzyme catalysis unmasked in new research
What makes enzymes such fantastic catalysts? New research from the University of Bristol is significantly advancing our understanding of how these proteins increase the rate of chemical reaction. Using a combination of experimental approaches and multiscale computational methods, including the hybrid QM/MM (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) approach for which Karplus, Warshel and Levitt won this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry, the team of researchers from England, Wales and Spain studied the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase - an important target for anti-infective and anti-cancer drugs.

Health - Chemistry - 15.10.2013
New drug shows same antidepressant effect as ketamine, study shows
A drug under development seems to have similar antidepressant effects as previously observed with ketamine, but without the same level of dangerous side effects seen when the anesthetic is abused as a party drug, according to a new Yale-led study. The findings of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial suggest a new generation of antidepressants that act upon the brain's glutamate system may offer rapid relief for millions of people suffering from chronic depression who have not responded to existing antidepressant medications.

Physics - Chemistry - 10.10.2013
Bending world's thinnest glass shows atoms' dance
Bending world's thinnest glass shows atoms' dance
Watch what happens when you bend and break the world's thinnest glass. This glass, discovered by Cornell researchers and their international team of collaborators, was recently featured in the Guinness Book of World Records and is made of the same compounds as everyday windowpanes. Now, a research team led by David A. Muller, professor of applied and engineering physics and co-director of the Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, and Ute Kaiser, professor at the University of Ulm, has used an electron microscope to bend, deform and melt the one-molecule-thick glass.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 03.10.2013
Enzyme catalysis unravelled in new research
New research by the School of Chemistry has significantly advanced our understanding of how enzymes (proteins) increase the rate of chemical reaction. Now potentially able to achieve greater control of enzyme action, this will clear the way for scientists to design new enzymes with important implications in a range of industries, and to develop new anti-infective and anti-cancer drugs.