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Life Sciences - Chemistry - 09.08.2013
Dad's genes build placentas, study shows
Dad’s genes build placentas, study shows
Though placentas support the fetus and mother, it turns out that the organ grows according to blueprints from dad, says new Cornell research. The study shows that the genes in a fetus that come from the father dominate in building the fetal side of the placenta. Genes work in pairs: one from each parent.

Chemistry - Mechanical Engineering - 09.08.2013
'Photo album' shows dances of droplets
'Photo album' shows dances of droplets
The splash from rain hitting a windowpane or printer ink hitting paper all comes down to tiny droplets hitting a surface, and what each of those droplets does. Cornell researchers have produced a high-resolution "photo album" of more than 30 shapes an oscillated drop of water can take. The results, a fundamental insight into how droplets behave, could have applications in everything from inkjet printing to microfluidics.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 08.08.2013
Fuel cells could become economically more attractive
Fuel cells could become economically more attractive
Fuel cells that convert hydrogen into power and only produce pure water as a by-product have the potential to lead individual mobility into an environmentally friendly future.

Chemistry - Physics - 07.08.2013
Electron ’spin’ key to solar cell breakthrough
We should see new materials and solar cells that make use of this very soon Akshay Rao Organic solar cells, a new class of solar cell that mimics the natural process of plant photosynthesis, could revolutionise renewable energy - but currently lack the efficiency to compete with the more costly commercial silicon cells.

Chemistry - Physics - 07.08.2013
Regulating electron 'spin' may be key to making organic solar cells competitive
Regulating electron ‘spin’ may be key to making organic solar cells competitive
Organic solar cells that convert light to electricity using carbon-based molecules have shown promise as a versatile energy source but have not been able to match the efficiency of their silicon-based counterparts. Now, researchers have discovered a synthetic, high-performance polymer that behaves differently from other tested materials and could make inexpensive, highly efficient organic solar panels a reality.

Chemistry - Physics - 05.08.2013
3D IR Images Now in Full Color
An iconic moment in the history of Hollywood movie magic was born in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz when Judy Garland as Dorothy Gale stepped out of the black and white world of Kansas into the rainbow colored world of Oz. An iconic moment in the history of infrared imaging may have been born with the announcement of the first technique to offer full color IR tomography.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 01.08.2013
Brain chemistry changes in children with autism offer clues to earlier detection and Intervention
Brain chemistry changes in children with autism offer clues to earlier detection and Intervention
Posted under: Health and Medicine , News Releases , Research , Science , Technology Between ages 3 and 10, children with autism spectrum disorder exhibit distinct brain chemical changes that differ from children with developmental delays and children with typical development, according to a new study led by University of Washington researchers.

Chemistry - Physics - 01.08.2013
Versatile polymer film synthesis method invented
Versatile polymer film synthesis method invented
Forming perfect porous polymer films is not enough; they need both large and small pores, and the process of making them needs to be simple, versatile and repeatable. Creatively combining already established techniques, Cornell materials researchers have devised a so-called hierarchical porous polymer film synthesis method that may help make these materials useful for applications ranging from catalysis to bioengineering.

Chemistry - Physics - 31.07.2013
New Clues Illuminate Alzheimer’s Roots
July 31, 2013 — Scientists at the University of Miami (UM) and Rice University have figured out how synthetic molecules designed at Rice latch onto the amyloid peptide fibrils thought to be responsible for Alzheimer's disease. Their discovery could point the way toward therapies to halt or even reverse the insidious disease.

Health - Chemistry - 31.07.2013
New signal stabilizes atherosclerotic plaques
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a new stabilizing agent of atherosclerotic plaques. These findings have been published in Science Translational Medicine, and show how the immune system can improve the condition in blood vessels to help the body avoid heart attacks. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease with accumulation of cholesterol in the vessel walls.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 30.07.2013
Computer modeling shows crucial function of water molecules in proteins
Using molecular simulations that modeled a potassium channel and its immediate cellular environment, atom for atom, UChicago scientists have discovered that just 12 molecules of water cause the long post-activation recovery period required by such ion channels before they can function again. The research has revealed a new mechanism in the function of a nearly universal biological structure that will have broad implications, ranging from fundamental biology to the design of pharmaceuticals.

Electroengineering - Chemistry - 30.07.2013
Researchers overcome technical hurdles in quest for inexpensive, durable electronics and solar cells
Researchers overcome technical hurdles in quest for inexpensive, durable electronics and solar cells
University of Minnesota engineers discover novel technology for producing "electronic ink" MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (07/30/2013) —Electronic touch pads that cost just a few dollars and solar cells that cost the same as roof shingles are one step closer to reality today. Researchers in the University of Minnesota's College of Science and Engineering and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colo., have overcome technical hurdles in the quest for inexpensive, durable electronics and solar cells made with non-toxic chemicals.

Physics - Chemistry - 29.07.2013
Corkscrew shaped light could improve screens and fibre optics
Corkscrew shaped light could improve screens and fibre optics
Next generation screens could slash energy use in TVs, mobiles and tablet PCs following new research on molecules that emit and detect twisted light. Brightly lit displays are a big drain on the energy supplies of mobile devices. Current technologies, such as backlit LCD screens, produce text and images by streaming white light through a series of polarising and colour filters, a process that typically wastes over 75 per cent of the light.

Chemistry - Physics - 29.07.2013
Tetrapod Quantum Dots Light the Way to Stronger Polymers
Tetrapod Quantum Dots Light the Way to Stronger Polymers
Fluorescent tetrapod nanocrystals could light the way to the future design of stronger polymer nanocomposites. A team of researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has developed an advanced opto-mechanical sensing technique based on tetrapod quantum dots that allows precise measurement of the tensile  strength of polymer fibers with minimal impact on the fiber's mechanical properties.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 25.07.2013
Research in the News: A blood-sucking parasite's weakness discovered
Research in the News: A blood-sucking parasite’s weakness discovered
Hookworms are a scourge of the world's poor, sucking blood from the intestines and causing anemia, lethargy, and developmental defects in nearly one billion people in developing countries. Hookworms, much smaller than a human hair, hatch in human feces, latch onto bare feet, travel to the blood stream and then to the lungs, where they are coughed up and swallowed.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 24.07.2013
Wave of blue fluorescence reveals pathway of death in worms
Wave of blue fluorescence reveals pathway of death in worms
The final biological events in the life of a worm have been described by scientists at UCL, revealing how death spreads like a wave from cell to cell until the whole organism is dead. Watch video When individual cells die, it triggers a chemical chain reaction that leads to the breakdown of cell components and a build-up of molecular debris.

Health - Chemistry - 23.07.2013
Yale lab finding may protect the heart during ischemia
Yale lab finding may protect the heart during ischemia
Research from three Yale laboratories - in the fields of immunobiology, chemistry, and cardiology - could lead to new drugs to reduce complications during cardiac surgery or heart attacks. If they pan out in human trials, the drugs would limit the detrimental impact of ischemia-restriction of blood flow-thereby cutting the degree of damage to the heart.

Chemistry - Environment - 23.07.2013
Computer can infer rules of the forest
Computer can infer rules of the forest
A forest full of rabbits and foxes, a bubbling vat of chemical reactants, and complex biochemical circuitry within a cell are, to a computer, similar systems: Many scenarios can play out depending on a fixed set of rules and individual interactions that can't be precisely predicted - chemicals combining, genes triggering cascades of chemical pathways, or rabbits multiplying or getting eaten.

Health - Chemistry - 22.07.2013
Studies Suggest New Key to "Switching Off" Hypertension
Catestatin-mimic pharmacophore model. Pharmacophore centers correspond to hydrophobic residues Leu5, Phe7, and Phe14; and positively charged residues Arg8, Arg10, and Arg15. Green circles represent hydrophobes and aromatic/hydrophobic features, while dark-blue circles represent NCN+ groups/cations/H-bond donors.

Health - Chemistry - 17.07.2013
Compound Discovered at Sea Shows Potency against Anthrax
A team led by William Fenical at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego has discovered a new chemical compound from an ocean microbe in a preliminary research finding that could one day set the stage for new treatments for anthrax and other ailments such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).