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Results 41 - 60 of 143.


Earth Sciences - Architecture - 14.08.2013
Team Investigates Earthquake Retrofits for ‘Soft’ First-floor Buildings on Jacobs School Shake Table
A team of researchers, led by Colorado State University engineering professor John van de Lindt, has spent the last month shaking a four-story building on the world's largest outdoor shake table at the University of California, San Diego, to learn how to make structures with first-floor garages better withstand seismic shocks.

Earth Sciences - 13.08.2013
Shortening tails gave early birds a leg up
Shortening tails gave early birds a leg up
A radical shortening of their bony tails over 100 million years ago enabled the earliest birds to develop versatile legs that gave them an evolutionary edge, a new study shows. A team led by Oxford University scientists examined fossils of the earliest birds from the Cretaceous Period, 145 - 66 million years ago, when early birds such as Confuciusornis, Eoenantiornis and Hongshanornis lived alongside their dinosaur kin.

Earth Sciences - Health - 09.08.2013
New source of arsenic threatens groundwater in Vietnam, Stanford research finds
New source of arsenic threatens groundwater in Vietnam, Stanford research finds
"Dig deep" to avoid naturally occurring arsenic contamination has been promoted as an answer to obtaining safe water in South Asia, which has experienced mass poisoning. But arsenic has been found in numerous deep wells drilled in the Mekong Delta region of southern Vietnam. Stanford Earth scientists suggest that the contamination occurs as arsenic is squeezed from ancient clay sediments surrounding the wells.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 09.08.2013
Fresh Analysis of Dinosaur Skulls by Penn Researchers Finds Three Species Are One
Fresh Analysis of Dinosaur Skulls by Penn Researchers Finds Three Species Are One
A new analysis of dinosaur fossils by University of Pennsylvania researchers has revealed that a number of specimens of the genus Psittacosaurus - once believed to represent three different species - are all members of a single species. The differences among the fossil remains that led other scientists to label them as separate species in fact arose from how the animals were buried and compressed, the study found.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 07.08.2013
Fossil indicates hairy, squirrel-sized creature was not quite a mammal
A newly discovered fossil reveals the evolutionary adaptations of a 165 million-year-old proto-mammal, providing evidence that traits such as hair and fur originated well before the rise of the first true mammals. UChicago scientists described the biological features of this ancient mammalian relative, named Megaconus mammaliaformis , in the Aug.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 30.07.2013
Dawn of Carnivores Explains Animal Boom in Distant Past
Nereids, carnivorous polychaete marine worms, utilize strong jaws to bite off chunks of soft-bodied animals. Authors of a new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that carnivorous polychaetes from low-oxygen regions decrease in abundance with decreasing oxygen levels.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 18.07.2013
How Mars' atmosphere got so thin: New insights from Curiosity
How Mars’ atmosphere got so thin: New insights from Curiosity
ANN ARBOR-New findings from NASA's Curiosity rover provide clues to how Mars lost its original atmosphere, which scientists believe was much thicker than the one left today. "The beauty of these measurements lies in the fact that these are the first really high-precision measurements of the composition of Mars' atmosphere," said Sushil Atreya, professor of atmospheric, oceanic and space sciences at the University of Michigan.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 16.07.2013
Evidence for a Martian Ocean
Evidence for a Martian Ocean
Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have discovered evidence for an ancient delta on Mars where a river might once have emptied into a vast ocean. This ocean, if it existed, could have covered much of Mars's northern hemisphere-stretching over as much as a third of the planet.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.07.2013
Global warming will raise sea levels for centuries
Global warming will raise sea levels for centuries
Greenhouse gases emitted today will cause sea level to rise for centuries to come. Each degree of global warming is likely to raise sea level by more than 2 meters in the future, a study now published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows. While thermal expansion of the ocean and melting mountain glaciers are the most important factors causing sea-level change today, the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets will be the dominant contributors within the next two millennia, according to the findings.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 11.07.2013
Scientists Cast Doubt on Theory of What Triggered Antarctic Glaciation
Scientists Cast Doubt on Theory of What Triggered Antarctic Glaciation
AUSTIN, Texas — A team of U.S. and U.K. scientists has found geologic evidence that casts doubt on one of the conventional explanations for how Antarctica's ice sheet began forming. Ian Dalziel, research professor at The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics and professor in the Jackson School of Geosciences , and his colleagues report the findings today in an online edition of the journal Geology .

Earth Sciences - 11.07.2013
Earth's core affects length of day
Earth’s core affects length of day
Research at the University of Liverpool has found that variations in the length of day over periods of between one and 10 years are caused by processes in the Earth's core. The Earth rotates once per day, but the length of this day varies. A year, 300million years ago, lasted about 450 days and a day would last about 21 hours.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 09.07.2013
Hazy days of summer: Southeast U.S. field work measures mercury, smog
Hazy days of summer: Southeast U.S. field work measures mercury, smog
Dozens of atmospheric scientists, including three University of Washington faculty members, are taking part in what's being described as one of the largest atmospheric field campaigns in decades. The six-week Southeast Atmosphere Study , through July 15, includes scientists from more than 30 different institutions.

Earth Sciences - 05.07.2013
Australia's place corrected in tectonic breakup
Australia’s place corrected in tectonic breakup
Researchers have used computer modelling to correct our understanding of the ancient movements of tectonic plates, which will help accurately locate oil and gas resources in our region. "The location of oil and hydrocarbon resources is determined by the tectonic architecture of the Earth," explains Professor Gordon Lister of the ANU Research School of Earth Sciences.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 02.07.2013
CryoSat maps largest-ever flood beneath Antarctica
2 July 2013 ESA's CryoSat satellite has found a vast crater in Antarctica's icy surface. Scientists believe the crater was left behind when a lake lying under about 3 km of ice suddenly drained. Far below the thick ice sheet that covers Antarctica, there are lakes of fresh water without a direct connection to the ocean.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 27.06.2013
Humans play role in Australia’s "angry" hot summer
Rebecca Scott, University of Melbourne, Mobile 0417164791, Alvin Stone, ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Systems Science, Mobile 0418 617 366, ? 'Peter Weiss, AGU Public Information Manager, Tel +1 (202) 777-7507 Human influences through global warming are likely to have played a role in Australia's recent "angry" hot summer, the hottest in Australia's observational record, new research has found.

Earth Sciences - 27.06.2013
River deep, mountain high - new study reveals clues to lifecycle of worlds iconic mountains
The study conducted by the University of Melbourne, Australia, and Aarhus University, Denmark, has revealed that interactions between landslides and erosion, caused by rivers, explains why some mountain ranges exceed their expected lifespan. Co-author Professor Mike Sandiford of the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne said the study had answered the quandary as to why there was fast erosion in active mountain ranges in the Himalayas and slow erosion in others such as the Great Dividing Range in Australia or the Urals in Russia.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 26.06.2013
Yukon gold mine yields ancient horse fossil
Yukon gold mine yields ancient horse fossil
When University of Alberta researcher Duane Froese found an unusually large horse fossil in the Yukon permafrost, he knew it was important. Now this fossil is rewriting the story of equine evolution as the ancient horse has its genome sequenced. Froese, a researcher in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and Canada Research Chair in Northern Environmental Change at the U of A, had spent years visiting Yukon placer gold mining exposures to understand the permafrost and the ice age environments that supported megafauna including mammoths, horses and bison.

Chemistry - Earth Sciences - 26.06.2013
A Stepping-Stone for Oxygen on Earth
A Stepping-Stone for Oxygen on Earth
For most terrestrial life on Earth, oxygen is necessary for survival. But the planet's atmosphere did not always contain this life-sustaining substance, and one of science's greatest mysteries is how and when oxygenic photosynthesis-the process responsible for producing oxygen on Earth through the splitting of water molecules-first began.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 20.06.2013
How did a third radiation belt appear in the Earth's upper atmosphere?
How did a third radiation belt appear in the Earth’s upper atmosphere?
Since the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts in in the Earth's upper atmosphere in 1958, space scientists have believed that these belts consisted of two doughnut-shaped rings of highly charged particles — an inner ring of high-energy electrons and energetic positive ions, and an outer ring of high-energy electrons.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.06.2013
We really do like to be beside the seaside, app confirms
We really do like to be beside the seaside, app confirms
We really do like to be beside the seaside, app confirms Spending time by the sea is one of the keys to happiness, according to a study that uses mobile technology to track people's wellbeing in different environments. The study was led by Dr George MacKerron , of the University of Sussex Department of Economics and LSE, and Professor Susana Mourato of LSE's Department of Geography and Environment.