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Environment - Earth Sciences - 29.08.2013
Mega-canyon discovered beneath Greenland ice sheet
Mega-canyon discovered beneath Greenland ice sheet
A previously unknown canyon hidden beneath two kilometres of ice covering Greenland has been discovered by a group of scientists, led by a team from the University of Bristol. The canyon is at least 750km long and in places as much as 800m deep and is on the same scale as parts of the Grand Canyon in Arizona, USA.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 28.08.2013
East Antarctic Ice Sheet could be more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought
East Antarctic Ice Sheet could be more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue. East Antarctic Ice Sheet could be more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought The world's largest ice sheet could be more vulnerable to the effects of climate change than previously thought, according to new research from Durham University.

Mechanical Engineering - Environment - 27.08.2013
No Evidence of Residential Property Value Impacts Near U.S. Wind Turbines, a New Berkeley Lab Study Finds
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) analyzed more than 50,000 home sales near 67 wind facilities in 27 counties across nine U.S. states, yet was unable to uncover any impacts to nearby home property values. "This is the second of two major studies we have conducted on this topic [the first was published in 2009 - see below], and in both studies [using two different datasets] we find no statistical evidence that operating wind turbines have had any measureable impact on home sales prices," says Ben Hoen, the lead author of the new report.

Environment - Life Sciences - 25.08.2013
New research offers insight into marine life’s ability to adapt to climate change
A study into marine life around an underwater volcanic vent in the Mediterranean, might hold the key to understanding how some species will be able to survive in increasingly acidic sea water should anthropogenic climate change continue. Researchers have discovered that some species of polychaete worms are able to modify their metabolic rates to better cope with and thrive in waters high in carbon dioxide (CO2), which is otherwise poisonous to other, often closely-related species.

Environment - Social Sciences - 20.08.2013
A new approach to making climate treaties function
Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Kelley/USCG International collaboration on climate change mitigation depends to a great extent on how agreements are designed. Institutions for international climate cooperation need to appeal to fairness and effectiveness to gain support, study says By Rob Jordan Why can't global leaders agree on a broad, effective climate change pact? More than 20 years after they began, international negotiations based on the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change have resulted in only one legally binding treaty.

Environment - 20.08.2013
Significant levels of iron found in South Atlantic ocean
Significant levels of iron found in South Atlantic ocean
Research by the University of Liverpool has found significant levels of iron and other micronutrients flowing from a hydrothermal vent in the South Atlantic ocean. A team of scientists took samples from a range of depths as they travelled across the South Atlantic from Brazil to Namibia.  Analysis of the samples revealed a distinct plume rich in iron and micronutrients above the mid-Atlantic ridge stretching for more than 1000km.

Environment - 19.08.2013
Meltwater from Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists say
Meltwater from Greenland’s ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists say
The team found that accelerating ice sheet movement from increasing meltwater lubrication is likely to have only a minor role in future sea-level rise. "This study walks us back from those fears a bit, and argues that we have a better handle-relative to 5-10 years ago-on how much sea-level rise we can expect from Greenland during the next few centuries." LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug.

Environment - Life Sciences - 19.08.2013
Plants can change greenhouse gas emissions after warming
Plants can change greenhouse gas emissions after warming
19 Aug 2013 Different moorland plants, particularly heather and cotton grass, can strongly influence climate warming effects on greenhouse gas emissions, researchers from Lancaster University, The University of Manchester and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology have discovered. The findings, published this week in leading journal Ecology Letters, show valuable carbon stores, which lie deep below peaty moorlands, are at risk from changes in climate and from land management techniques that alter plant diversity.

Environment - 19.08.2013
Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists say
Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland’s ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists say
The team found that accelerating ice sheet movement from increasing meltwater lubrication is likely to have only a minor role in future sea-level rise. "This study walks us back from those fears a bit, and argues that we have a better handle-relative to 5-10 years ago-on how much sea-level rise we can expect from Greenland during the next few centuries." LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug.

Environment - 16.08.2013
Extreme weather events fuel climate change
Extreme weather events fuel climate change
As an international team of researchers under major cooperation of the Universitiy of Innsbruck reports, extreme weather events play an important part in the global carbon balance. Their They resume a self-reinforcing effect between extreme weather events and climate change. Photo: Michael Bahn and his research group carry out field experiments in the Tyrolean Stubaital: They simulate drought periods on defined areas.

Environment - 16.08.2013
Insect and river health improves after tobacco agriculture removed
New research has linked deformed insects to pesticide pollution from intensive tobacco cultivation around the Oven's River in Victoria, and found once the industry ceased operating the river's health improved. The study shows that using insects as indicators of environmental health may provide new techniques that are useful for monitoring agriculture to keep it sustainable, and that these methods may actually be cheaper than traditional chemical assays.

Life Sciences - Environment - 15.08.2013
Female frogs prefer males who can multitask
MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (08/15/2013) —From frogs to humans, selecting a mate is complicated. Females of many species judge suitors based on many indicators of health or parenting potential. But it can be difficult for males to produce multiple signals that demonstrate these qualities simultaneously.

Chemistry - Environment - 14.08.2013
Raising the IQ of Smart Windows
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have designed a new material to make smart windows even smarter. The material is a thin coating of nanocrystals embedded in glass that can dynamically modify sunlight as it passes through a window.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 14.08.2013
Earth orbit changes were key to Antarctic warming that ended last ice age
Earth orbit changes were key to Antarctic warming that ended last ice age
For more than a century scientists have known that Earth's ice ages are caused by the wobbling of the planet's orbit, which changes its orientation to the sun and affects the amount of sunlight reaching higher latitudes, particularly the polar regions. The Northern Hemisphere's last ice age ended about 20,000 years ago, and most evidence has indicated that the ice age in the Southern Hemisphere ended about 2,000 years later, suggesting that the south was responding to warming in the north.

Environment - 13.08.2013
Soil biodiversity crucial to land management and response to climate change
13 Aug 2013 Research by scientists at The University of Manchester shows maintaining healthy soil biodiversity can play an important role in optimising land management programmes to reap benefits from the living soil. The findings, published in the latest edition of the journal PNAS, extend the understanding about the factors that regulate soil biodiversity.

Environment - 12.08.2013
Melting water’s lubricating effect on glaciers has only ’minor’ role in future sea-level rise
Concerns that melting water would speed up the decline of Greenland's ice sheet have been allayed by new research which shows the lubricating effect of water beneath glaciers will not significantly add to sea-level rise. Scientists had feared that melt-water which trickles down through the ice could dramatically speed up the movement of glaciers as it acts as a lubricant between the ice and the ground it moves over.

Environment - Health - 12.08.2013
Irrigation in arid regions can increase malaria risk for a decade
Irrigation in arid regions can increase malaria risk for a decade
ANN ARBOR-New irrigation systems in arid regions benefit farmers but can increase the local malaria risk for more than a decade - which is longer than previously believed - despite intensive and costly use of insecticides, new University of Michigan-led study in northwest India concludes. The study's findings demonstrate the need to include a strong, binding commitment to finance and implement long-term public health and safety programs when building large-scale irrigation projects, according to the researchers.

Environment - Health - 04.08.2013
Global investigation reveals true scale of ocean warming
Warming oceans are causing marine species to change breeding times and shift homes with expected substantial consequences for the broader marine landscape, according to a new global study. The three-year research project, funded by the National Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis in California, has shown widespread systemic shifts in measures such as distribution of species and phenology – the timing of nature’s calendar – on a scale comparable to or greater than those observed on land.

Environment - Life Sciences - 01.08.2013
Scientists review the ecological effects of sea ice loss
Scientists review the ecological effects of sea ice loss
The Arctic Ocean has more open water each summer, a trend most scientists predict will continue in coming years. September 2012 set the record for the most open water since satellite observations began. A University of Washington researcher is co-author on a review paper published this week (Aug. 2) looking at the ecological consequences of sea ice decline.

Environment - 01.08.2013
Warmer climate strongly affects human conflict and violence worldwide, says study
Shifts in climate are strongly linked to human violence around the world, and according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and Princeton University, even relatively minor departures from normal temperatures or rainfall can substantially increase the risk of conflict.