news 2013

« BACK

Life Sciences



Results 1001 - 1020 of 1074.
« Previous 1 ... 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 ... 54 Next »


Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2013
New discovery shows genetic causes of rare bone condition
New discovery shows genetic causes of rare bone condition
Researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered two new genetic causes of craniosynostosis, a rare bone condition that can inhibit brain growth in children. The work will give affected families much greater understanding of the condition and inform patient treatment plans. Andrew Wilkie, Nuffield Professor of Pathology at the University of Oxford and honorary consultant at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, led the research, the results of which were published .

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2013
Tests conducted on Israel's Ariel Sharon reveal significant brain activity
Tests conducted on Israel’s Ariel Sharon reveal significant brain activity
A team of American and Israeli brain scientists tested former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon to assess his brain responses, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Surprisingly, Sharon showed significant brain activity. The team consisted of Martin Monti , an assistant professor of psychology and neurosurgery at UCLA, professors Alon Friedman, Galia Avidan and Tzvi Ganel of the Zlotowski Center for Neuroscience at Israel's Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, and Ilan Shelef, head of medical imaging at Israel's Soroka University Medical Center.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.01.2013
Genes behind aggressive endometrial cancer
Genes behind aggressive endometrial cancer
In a major breakthrough for uterine serous carcinoma (USC) - a chemo-resistant, aggressive form of endometrial cancer, Yale researchers have defined the genetic landscape of USC tumors, findings that point to new treatment opportunities. The collaborative team-which included researchers with expertise in gynecological cancer, genomics, and computational biology- identified a number of new genes that are frequently mutated in USC.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.01.2013
Omega-3 can help laying hens avoid bone damage
Omega-3 can help laying hens avoid bone damage
Most of us are aware of the potential health benefits of omega-3 found in fish oil and flax seed. Now researchers have found that omega-3 could help laying hens avoid bone damage, which affects millions of hens each year, and the research may also help human patients suffering from osteoporosis. The three-year research project, led by John Tarlton and colleagues from the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences , investigated the benefits of omega-3 supplemented diets in laying hens.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.01.2013
Poor sleep in old age prevents the brain from storing memories
The connection between poor sleep, memory loss and brain deterioration as we grow older has been elusive. But for the first time, scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have found a link between these hallmark maladies of old age. Their discovery opens the door to boosting the quality of sleep in elderly people to improve memory.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.01.2013
MAX IV laboratory to benefit from Danish research investment
A Danish research project which aims to maximise the University of Copenhagen’s use of MAX IV and ESS has been awarded DKK 29.7 million. The project, led by the former interim director of the MAX IV laboratory, Sine Larsen, will interact closely with the MAX IV laboratory which stands to benefit from the increased research activities.

Life Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 25.01.2013
Dung Beetles Follow the Milky Way
You might expect dung beetles to keep their "noses to the ground", but they are actually incredibly attuned to the sky. Indeed, a report in the 24 January Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, shows that, even on the darkest of nights, African ball-rolling insects are guided by the soft glow of the Milky Way.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.01.2013
Epigenetic information could be inherited
Epigenetic information could be inherited
Our research demonstrates how genes could retain some memory of their past experiences, revealing that one of the big barriers to the theory of epigenetic inheritance - that epigenetic information is erased between generations - should be reassessed." —Dr Jamie Hackett New research reveals a potential way for how parents' experiences could be passed to their offspring's genes.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.01.2013
Exercise can slow onset of Alzheimer’s memory loss -- scientists identify link
Keeping active can slow down the progression of memory loss in people with Alzheimer's disease, a study has shown. A team of researchers from The University of Nottingham has identified a stress hormone produced during moderate exercise that may protect the brain from memory changes related to the disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.01.2013
Cardiac development needs more than protein-coding genes
Biologists find that long non-coding RNA molecules are necessary to regulate differentiation of embryonic stem cells into cardiac cells. When the human genome was sequenced, biologists were surprised to find that very little of the genome - less than 3 percent - corresponds to protein-coding genes. What, they wondered, was all the rest of that DNA doing? It turns out that much of it codes for genetic snippets known as long non-coding RNAs, or lncRNAs.

Life Sciences - 24.01.2013
Designer babies may explain insect sociality
Designer babies may explain insect sociality
Being able to choose the sex of their babies may be the key to the complex societies built by ants, bees, and wasps, according to Oxford University scientists. The researchers calculated the evolutionary costs and benefits to insect mothers of choosing the sex of their offspring and showed that, if females help out with bringing up babies, then mothers prefer to have daughters rather than sons - leading to a large workforce of female helpers.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.01.2013
Live pathogens: rapid detection technique developed
Live pathogens: rapid detection technique developed
Los Alamos researchers have developed a better technique for quick detection of live pathogens in the field. Identification of viable bacteria in a complex environment is scientifically challenging. Current detection and diagnostic techniques are inadequate in major public health emergencies, such as outbreaks of food-borne illness.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2013
Axon Repair
Scientists at Penn State and Duke University have identified a gene associated with regeneration of injured nerve cells, furthering our understanding of human spinal-cord and other neurological diseases. The team, led by Melissa Rolls , assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State, has found that a mutation in a single gene can entirely shut down the process by which axons-the parts of the nerve cell that are responsible for sending signals to other cells-regrow themselves after being cut or damaged.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 23.01.2013
Owl Monkeys Who 'Stay True' Produce More Offspring Than Those With Multiple Partners, Penn Study Finds
Owl Monkeys Who ’Stay True’ Produce More Offspring Than Those With Multiple Partners, Penn Study Finds
Breaking up is hard to do - and can be detrimental to one's reproductive fitness, according to a new University of Pennsylvania study. Focusing on wide-eyed, nocturnal owl monkeys, considered a socially monogamous species, the research reveals that, when an owl monkey pair is severed by an intruding individual, the mate who takes up with a new partner produces fewer offspring than a monkey who sticks with its tried-and-true partner.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2013
Genetic key to efficient crops
Genetic key to efficient crops
With projections of 9.5 billion people by 2050, humankind faces the challenge of feeding modern diets to additional mouths while using the same amounts of water, fertilizer and arable land as today. Cornell researchers have taken a leap toward meeting those needs by discovering a gene that could lead to new varieties of staple crops with 50 percent higher yields.

Environment - Life Sciences - 23.01.2013
Better outlook for dwindling black macaque population in Indonesia
Better outlook for dwindling black macaque population in Indonesia
Since at least the 1970s, the population of critically endangered Sulawesi black macaques living in an Indonesian nature reserve has been dropping. But a new study by researchers at the University of Washington and in Indonesia shows that the population has stabilized over the past decade. The findings , published in the January issue of the American Journal of Primatology, are from the longest ongoing survey of Macaca nigra and are among the first evidence that the monkeys may be in better shape.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.01.2013
Helping healthy cells could be key to fighting leukaemia, research suggests
Helping healthy cells could be key to fighting leukaemia, research suggests
Researchers at Imperial College London have shown that keeping healthy blood cells alive could be a more important tool in the fight against leukaemia than keeping cancerous cells at bay. The team used computer modelling to show that maintaining a friendly environment for healthy cells was more effective than targeting the damaged cells directly.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.01.2013
Study first to image concussion-related abnormal brain proteins in retired NFL players
Sports-related concussions and mild traumatic brain injuries have grabbed headlines in recent months, as the long-term damage they can cause becomes increasingly evident among both current and former athletes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that millions of these injuries occur each year.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.01.2013
Brain structure of infants predicts language skills at 1 year
Brain structure of infants predicts language skills at 1 year
Using a brain-imaging technique that examines the entire infant brain, researchers have found that the anatomy of certain brain areas - the hippocampus and cerebellum - can predict children's language abilities at 1 year of age. The University of Washington study is the first to associate these brain structures with future language skills.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 22.01.2013
Researchers map emotional intelligence in the brain
Researchers map emotional intelligence in the brain
CHAMPAIGN, lll. A new study of 152 Vietnam veterans with combat-related brain injuries offers the first detailed map of the brain regions that contribute to emotional intelligence - the ability to process emotional information and navigate the social world. The study found significant overlap between general intelligence and emotional intelligence, both in terms of behavior and in the brain.
« Previous 1 ... 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 ... 54 Next »