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Life Sciences - Chemistry - 22.01.2013
Odd biochemistry yields lethal bacterial protein
Odd biochemistry yields lethal bacterial protein
CHAMPAIGN, lll. While working out the structure of a cell-killing protein produced by some strains of the bacterium Enterococcus faecalis , researchers stumbled on a bit of unusual biochemistry. They found that a single enzyme helps form distinctly different, three-dimensional ring structures in the protein, one of which had never been observed before.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.01.2013
Volunteers needed for study on exercise and the ageing brain
Researchers based at the University of Oxford are investigating how physical and mental exercise could prevent brain decline in older people. The Cognitive Health in Ageing project (CHA) is recruiting healthy volunteers aged 60 or over to provide valuable insights into how the brain can adapt and change during ageing.

Physics - Life Sciences - 21.01.2013
Three-photon microscopy improves biological imaging
Three-photon microscopy improves biological imaging
Scientists may be a step closer to cracking one of the world's most compelling mysteries: the impossible complexity of the brain and its billions of neurons. Cornell researchers have demonstrated a new way of taking high-resolution, three-dimensional images of the brain's inner workings through a three-fold improvement in the depth limits of multiphoton microscopy, a fluorescence-based imaging technique with Cornell roots.

Life Sciences - 21.01.2013
Uncovering the secrets of 3D vision: How glossy objects can fool the human brain
It's a familiar sight at the fairground: rows of people gaping at curvy mirrors as they watch their faces and bodies distort. But while mirrored surfaces may be fun to look at, new findings by researchers from the Universities of Birmingham, Cambridge and Giessen, suggest they pose a particular challenge for the human brain in processing images for 3D vision.

Life Sciences - 21.01.2013
'Sexual networks' reveal complex mating game
'Sexual networks' reveal complex mating game
Social networks can be used to describe the sexual interactions in animal populations and reveal which individuals are directly competing in the 'mating game', according to new Oxford University research. These 'sexual networks' can unlock how sexual selection operates in animal societies where females often mate with multiple males.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.01.2013
Epigenetic changes can explain rheumatism
Epigenetic changes can explain rheumatism
A new study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the US shows that so-called epigenetic changes in the DNA are involved in causing rheumatoid arthritis, and that these changes can be genetically predetermined. The paper, which is published in the scientific periodical Nature Biotechnology, sheds light on how risk genes can be expressed in disease and why some individuals are affected more readily than others.

Life Sciences - 21.01.2013
Sue Wray appointed as journal Editor in Chief
Sue Wray, from the Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology has been appointed as the Founding Editor in Chief to a new open access journal that is being jointly launched by The Physiological Society (TPS) and American Physiological Society (APS). Physiological Reports will be the first new journal of the Physiology Society in 100 years, and the first fully open access online-only journal for the two societies.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.01.2013
Four-stranded ‘quadruple helix’ DNA structure proven to exist in human cells
Four-stranded ‘quadruple helix’ DNA structure proven to exist in human cells
For us, it strongly supports a new paradigm to be investigated - using these four-stranded structures as targets for personalised treatments in the future." —Shankar Balasubramanian In 1953, Cambridge researchers Watson and Crick published a paper describing the interweaving 'double helix' DNA structure – the chemical code for all life.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.01.2013
Promising New Target for Parkinson's Disease Therapies
Promising New Target for Parkinson’s Disease Therapies
With a new insight into a model of Parkinson's disease, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine have identified a novel target for mitigating some of the disease's toll on the brain. Narayan G. Avadhani , Harriet Ellison Woodward Professor of Biochemistry and chair of the Department of Animal Biology at Penn Vet, was the senior author on the research.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.01.2013
Learning the alphabet of gene control
Learning the alphabet of gene control
Scientists at Karolinska Institutet have made a large step towards the understanding of how human genes are regulated. In a new study, published in the journal Cell, they identified the DNA sequences that bind to over four hundred proteins that control expression of genes. This knowledge is required to understand how differences in genomes of individuals affect their risk to develop disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2013
Individuals with a low risk for cocaine dependence have a differently shaped brain to those with addiction
Individuals with a low risk for cocaine dependence have a differently shaped brain to those with addiction
Our findings indicate that preventative strategies might be more effective if they were tailored more closely to those individuals at risk according to their personality profile and brain structure." —Dr Karen Ersche People who take cocaine over many years without becoming addicted have a brain structure which is significantly different from those individuals who developed cocaine-dependence, researchers have discovered.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.01.2013
New technology shows diabetes
Press Release from Umeň University A new imaging method for further developing studies of insulin-producing cells in diabetes, among other uses, is now being presented by a group of researchers at Umeň University, in the form of a video in the first biomedical video journal, Journal of Visualized Experiments.

Life Sciences - Environment - 17.01.2013
‘Jet-lagged’ fruit flies provide clues for body clock synchronisation
New research led by a team at Queen Mary, University of London, has found evidence of how daily changes in temperature affect the fruit fly's internal clock. "A wide range of organisms, including insects and humans, have evolved an internal clock to regulate daily patterns of behaviour, such as sleep, appetite, and attention," explains Professor Ralf Stanewsky , senior study author from Queen Mary's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.01.2013
Breast cancer discovery could help doctors tailor treatment
Breast cancer discovery could help doctors tailor treatment
Medical researchers at the University of Alberta tested the DNA of more than 300 women in Alberta and discovered a "genetic marker" method to help accurately profile which women were more likely to have their breast cancer return years later. Sambasivarao Damaraju , a professor with the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry and at the Cross Cancer Institute, just published his team's findings in the peer-reviewed journal, PLOS ONE .

Health - Life Sciences - 16.01.2013
Mindfulness meditation may relieve chronic inflammation
People suffering from chronic inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and asthma — in which psychological stress plays a major role — may benefit from mindfulness meditation techniques, according to a study by University of Wisconsin-Madison neuroscientists with the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds in the Waisman Center.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.01.2013
Transmission of Tangles in Alzheimer's Mice Provides More Authentic Model of Tau Pathology, Penn Study Shows
Transmission of Tangles in Alzheimer's Mice Provides More Authentic Model of Tau Pathology, Penn Study Shows
Brain diseases associated with the misformed protein tau, including Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with tau pathologies, are characterized by neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) comprised of pathological tau filaments. Tau tangles are also found in progressive supranuclear palsy, cortical basal degeneration and other related tauopathies, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy due to repetitive traumatic brain injuries sustained in sports or on the battle field.

Life Sciences - 16.01.2013
Scientists identify new ‘social’ chromosome in the red fire ant
Researchers have discovered a social chromosome in the highly invasive fire ant that helps to explain why some colonies allow for more than one queen ant, and could offer new solutions for dealing with this pest. The red fire ants live in two different types of colonies: some colonies strictly have a single queen while other colonies contain hundreds of queens.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.01.2013
Investing in the future
From early disease detection to better drug design and more efficient nanoelectronics - three McGill research projects share close to $11 million in awards from the CFI The Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) has awarded an impressive $ 10,861,200 to three McGill University researchers under its Leading Edge Fund (LEF).

Life Sciences - Environment - 15.01.2013
Viruses that infect oceans' tiny beings are discovered
Viruses that infect oceans’ tiny beings are discovered
Viruses are well known for making people sick, but a new study provides evidence for the first time of viral infections in tiny marine crustaceans called copepods. While predation by fish and other aquatic creatures accounts for the majority of copepod deaths, up to 35 percent of the zooplankton's (tiny organisms) mortalities are unknown.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.01.2013
Multicellularity, a key event in the evolution of life
Multicellularity, a key event in the evolution of life
Multicellularity in cyanobacteria originated before 2.4 billion years ago and is associated with the accumulation of atmospheric oxygen, subsequently enabling the evolution of aerobic life, as we know it today, according to a new study from the University of Zurich involving researchers now at the University of Bristol , and Gothenburg.
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