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Life Sciences - Health - 15.01.2013
New culprit for epileptic seizures
Discovery that some seizures arise in glial cells could offer new targets for epilepsy treatment. Epileptic seizures occur when neurons in the brain become excessively active. However, a new study from MIT neuroscientists suggests that some seizures may originate in non-neuronal cells known as glia, which were long believed to play a mere supporting role in brain function.

Economics / Business - Life Sciences - 15.01.2013
Born to lead? Leadership can be an inherited trait, study finds
Born to lead? Leadership can be an inherited trait, study finds
Genetic differences are significantly associated with the likelihood that people take on managerial responsibilities, according to new research from UCL (University College London). The study, published online in Leadership Quarterly , is the first to identify a specific DNA sequence associated with the tendency for individuals to occupy a leadership position.

Life Sciences - 14.01.2013
Reassembling the backbone of life using a particle accelerator
Reassembling the backbone of life using a particle accelerator
The results of this study force us to re-write the textbook on backbone evolution in the earliest limbed animals" —Stephanie Pierce Research published today (Sunday 13 January 2013) in the journal Nature documents, for the first time, the intricate three-dimensional structure of the backbone in the earliest four-legged animals (tetrapods).

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2013
The secret sex life of the penicillin-producing fungus could make it more productive
New and more effective strains of the fungus used to produce penicillin could be developed after a team of international scientists unearthed the secret sex life of Sir Alexander Fleming's fungus Penicillium chrysogenum (P. chrysogenum). The scientists from The University of Nottingham , Ruhr-University Bochum, The University of Göttingen, and Sandoz GmbH have announced a major breakthrough in our understanding of the sex life of the fungus P. chrysogenum.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2013
Manipulating the Schmallemberg virus genome to understand how it causes disease
Scottish researchers have developed methods to synthesize and change the genome of a recently discovered virus, in a bid to understand how it induces disease among livestock such as cattle, sheep and goats. The research, led by Massimo Palmarini and Alain Kohl at the MRC Centre for Virus Research at the University of Glasgow, has laid bare important ways by which the Schmallenberg virus (SBV) causes disease and has paved the way for future development of new vaccines.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2013
Virus Caught in the Act of Infecting a Cell
Virus Caught in the Act of Infecting a Cell
AUSTIN, Texas — The detailed changes in the structure of a virus as it infects an  E. coli  bacterium have been observed for the first time, report researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UT Health) Medical School this week in  Science Express .

Health - Life Sciences - 10.01.2013
Nursing gerbils unravel benefit of multiple mothers in collective mammals
In mammals such as rodents that raise their young as a group, infants will nurse from their mother as well as other females, a dynamic known as allosuckling. Ecologists have long hypothesized that allosuckling lets newborns stockpile antibodies to various diseases, but the experimental proof has been lacking until now.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.01.2013
Co-infection and disease control
Becoming infected with one parasite could change your chances of becoming infected with another according to new University research. A new study led by the School of Biosciences analyses data from school-aged children in Tanzania infected with the most common forms of worms. It has found that infection by one parasitic species actually changes the risk of catching another, over and above other risk factors.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.01.2013
First Alzheimer’s case has full diagnosis 106 years later
More than a hundred years after Alois Alzheimer identified Alzheimer's disease in a patient an analysis of that original patient's brain has revealed the genetic origin of their condition. The brain specimen tested was discovered in a university basement late last century after a search by rival teams of academics.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.01.2013
Stressed-out cells halt protein synthesis
Stressed-out cells halt protein synthesis
Cells experience stress in multiple ways. Temperature shifts, mis-folded proteins and oxidative damage can all cause cellular stress. But whatever the form of the stress, all cells quickly stop making proteins when under pressure. A new Cornell study unravels how cells rapidly stall protein synthesis during stress and then resume their protein-making activities once the stress has passed.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.01.2013
McGill launches major study on prevention of HPV
A new study by McGill University's Division of Cancer Epidemiology will test a revolutionary way of preventing the transmission of the human papillomavirus (HPV) through the use of a topical gel applied during sexual activity. The study - called CATCH, an acronym for Carrageenan-gel Against Transmission of Cervical HPV - is a double-blind randomized controlled trial involving over 450 women, each of whom will receive either an active gel containing a specific type of sea algae extract commonly referred to as carrageenan or a placebo gel.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.01.2013
Gene testing asthmatic children could lead to better treatment
Gene testing asthmatic children could lead to better treatment
Testing asthmatic children for a specific gene could prevent their condition worsening, according to new research by scientists at the Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) and the University of Dundee. There are two main treatments for asthma: 'preventers' and 'relievers'. The genotype is carried by one in seven sufferers and the research found their condition could be aggravated by the use of the reliever medicine, Salmeterol.

Life Sciences - 08.01.2013
Genes and obesity: Fast food isn't only culprit in expanding waistlines -- DNA is also to blame
Genes and obesity: Fast food isn’t only culprit in expanding waistlines -- DNA is also to blame
Researchers at UCLA say it's not just what you eat that makes those pants tighter — it's also genetics. In a new study, scientists discovered that body-fat responses to a typical fast-food diet are determined in large part by genetic factors, and they have identified several genes they say may control those responses.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.01.2013
Blood brothers (and sisters): U-M sibling study discovers genetic region linked to control of key blood-clotting protein
Blood brothers (and sisters): U-M sibling study discovers genetic region linked to control of key blood-clotting protein
ANN ARBOR-In 2006, the lab of David Ginsburg at the Life Sciences Institute put a call out for siblings attending the University of Michigan to donate blood for a study of blood-clotting disorders. The samples were collected over three years and have now enabled the researchers to identify the specific parts of the genome responsible for levels of a key substance for blood clotting.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.01.2013
Tiny tools help advance medical discoveries
MIT researchers are designing tools to analyze cells at the microscale. With the recent launch of MIT's Institute for Medical Engineering and Science , MIT News examines research with the potential to reshape medicine and health care through new scientific knowledge, novel treatments and products, better management of medical data, and improvements in health-care delivery.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.01.2013
Overactive brain keeps autistic teens from adjusting to social situations
ANN ARBOR-A new University of Michigan study finds that an overactive part of the brain hinders autistic teens from coping in unfamiliar social settings, leaving them feeling overwhelmed and anxious. Seeing the same faces repeatedly can negatively affect autistic children, especially in social situations.

Life Sciences - 08.01.2013
How sperm swim near surfaces
How sperm swim near surfaces
" Interactions between swimming cells and surfaces feature prominently in a wide range of microbiological processes, most importantly in the formation of bacterial films and during the fertilisation of the human egg. Yet, surprisingly little has been known about the physical mechanisms that govern the accumulation of microbes at surfaces.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 08.01.2013
Microswimmers hit the wall
Microswimmers hit the wall
" The results of a study published today (7 January) suggest that microbes 'feel' their way along a solid surface, much as a blindfolded person would move near a wall. Using high-speed microscopic imaging, University of Cambridge researchers have found that sperm cells accumulate at surfaces and algae move away from them as a result of between the surface and the cells' flagella or cilia - the hair-like appendages that propel cells through their fluid environment.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2013
Cheap and easy technique to snip DNA could revolutionize gene therapy
Cheap and easy technique to snip DNA could revolutionize gene therapy
A simple, precise and inexpensive method for cutting DNA to insert genes into human cells could transform genetic medicine, making routine what now are expensive, complicated and rare procedures for replacing defective genes in order to fix genetic disease or even cure AIDS. Discovered last year by Jennifer Doudna and Martin Jinek of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and University of California, Berkeley, and Emmanuelle Charpentier of the Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine-Sweden, the technique was labeled a "tour de force" in a 2012 review.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.01.2013
Healthy BMI levels, physical activity linked to endometrial cancer survival
Healthy BMI levels, physical activity linked to endometrial cancer survival
Higher body mass index (BMI) and physical inactivity are associated with more than a two-fold increase in risk for mortality among women with endometrial cancer, new research by the Yale School of Public Health has found. The study appears in the current issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
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