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Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2013
New blood group system discovered by Swedish researchers
When giving blood transfusions, it is essential to take different blood groups into account. ABO and Rh are just two of many blood group systems; now a new one has been added. The system, which is the first one to have been discovered in Sweden, has been mapped by researchers at Lund University and Gothenburg University.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.01.2013
Cellular fuel gauge may restrict cancer growth
Researchers at McGill University have discovered that a key regulator of energy metabolism in cancer cells known as the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) may play a crucial role in restricting cancer cell growth. AMPK acts as a "fuel gauge" in cells; AMPK is turned on when it senses changes in energy levels, and helps to change metabolism when energy levels are low, such as during exercise or when fasting.

Life Sciences - 07.01.2013
New stem cell approach for blindness successful in mice
New stem cell approach for blindness successful in mice
Blind mice can see again, after Oxford University researchers transplanted developing cells into their eyes and found they could re-form the entire light-sensitive layer of the retina. Videos show the nocturnal mice, which once didn't notice the difference between light and dark at all, now run from the light and prefer to be in the dark - just like mice with normal vision.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.01.2013
International study suggests human genes influence gut microbial composition
New research led by the Karolinska Instituet, Sweden and the University of Glasgow, Scotland, has identified a link between a human gene and the composition of human gastrointestinal bacteria. In a study published as a letter to the journal Gut today, the team outline new evidence suggesting that the human genome may play a role in determining the makeup of the billions of microbes in the human gastrointestinal tract collectively known as the gut microbiota.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2013
New compound overcomes drug-resistant Staph infection in mice
New compound overcomes drug-resistant Staph infection in mice
University of Illinois chemistry professor Eric Oldfield, center, graduate student Wei Zhu, left, research scientist Yonghui Zhang and their colleagues at UC San Diego discovered a compound that cured drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice. Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, lll.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.01.2013
'Science' names University of Minnesota researcher's gene-modification technique one of 2012's top scientific breakthroughs
'Science' names University of Minnesota researcher's gene-modification technique one of 2012's top scientific breakthroughs
News Release Media Note: For a high-resolution image of Daniel Voytas, please Matt Hodson ( mjhodson [a] umn (p) edu ) or Stephanie Xenos ( sxenos [a] umn (p) edu ). MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (01/07/2013) —An approach to modify genes developed by University of Minnesota researcher Daniel Voytas and colleagues was among the "breakthroughs of the year" detailed in a special issue of Science published December 21.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.01.2013
Most-Used Diabetes Drug Works in Different Way than Previously Thought
Most-Used Diabetes Drug Works in Different Way than Previously Thought
A team, led by senior author Morris J. Birnbaum, MD, PhD , the Willard and Rhoda Ware Professor of Medicine, with the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism , Perelman School of Medicine , University of Pennsylvania, found that the diabetes drug metformin works in a different way than previously understood.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 04.01.2013
Dinosaur shook tail feathers for mating show
Dinosaur shook tail feathers for mating show
A University of Alberta researcher's examination of fossilized dinosaur tail bones has led to a breakthrough finding: some feathered dinosaurs used tail plumage to attract mates, much like modern-day peacocks and turkeys. U of A paleontology researcher Scott Persons followed a chain of fossil evidence that started with a peculiar fusing together of vertebrae at the tip of the tail of four different species of dinosaurs, some separated in time and evolution by 45 million years.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.01.2013
Study suggests effect of fructose on brain may promote overeating
Study suggests effect of fructose on brain may promote overeating
The brain processes fructose and glucose, the two forms of simple sugars, differently - impacting appetite, feelings of satisfaction, fullness, and potential weight gain, according to a study by Yale School of Medicine researchers published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Glucose, but not fructose, suppresses brain activity in regions that promote the desire to eat, whereas fructose feeding may promote overeating through its inability to effectively suppress food-seeking behavior, the scientists found.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.01.2013
Pesticides and Parkinson's: UCLA researchers uncover further proof of a link
Pesticides and Parkinson’s: UCLA researchers uncover further proof of a link
For several years, neurologists at UCLA have been building a case that a link exists between pesticides and Parkinson's disease. To date, paraquat, maneb and ziram — common chemicals sprayed in California's Central Valley and elsewhere — have been tied to increases in the disease , not only among farmworkers but in individuals who simply lived or worked near fields and likely inhaled drifting particles.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 03.01.2013
Scientists pinpoint molecular signals that make some women prone to miscarriage
Scientists pinpoint molecular signals that make some women prone to miscarriage
Scientists have identified molecular signals that control whether embryos are accepted by the womb, and that appear to function abnormally in women who have suffered repeated miscarriages. The research, carried out at Imperial College London and the University of Warwick , suggests these signals could be targets for drugs that would help prevent miscarriage in women who are particularly vulnerable.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.01.2013
The top 12 research stories of 2012
The top 12 research stories of 2012
If anyone deserves a toast for a job well done over the past year, it's the talented researchers at the University of Alberta. Their bold explorations in their own fields, and their work together in interdisciplinary teams rich in experience and expertise, led to discoveries that will expand the boundaries of knowledge and improve the lives of people in Alberta, in Canada and around the world.

Life Sciences - 02.01.2013
While in womb, babies begin learning language from their mothers
Babies only hours old are able to differentiate between sounds from their native language and a foreign language, scientists have discovered. The study indicates that babies begin absorbing language while still in the womb, earlier than previously thought. Sensory and brain mechanisms for hearing are developed at 30 weeks of gestational age, and the new study shows that unborn babies are listening to their mothers talk during the last 10 weeks of pregnancy and at birth can demonstrate what they've heard.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.01.2013
Electric stimulation of brain releases powerful, opiate-like painkiller
ANN ARBOR-Researchers used electricity on certain regions in the brain of a patient with chronic, severe facial pain to release an opiate-like substance that's considered one of the body's most powerful painkillers. The findings expand on previous work done at the University of Michigan, Harvard University and the City University of New York where researchers delivered electricity through sensors on the skulls of chronic migraine patients, and found a decrease in the intensity and pain of their headache attacks.
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