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Life Sciences - Health - 18.12.2013
New gene mutation will help better diagnosis of myopathy
A new gene mutation which will help doctors give a more accurate diagnosis of a type of brain and muscle disease in children has been discovered for the first time by University of Leeds experts. Mitochondrial myopathy, as it is known, causes muscle weakness, movement problems and learning difficulties and affects more than 70,000 people in the UK.

Physics - Life Sciences - 18.12.2013
UT Austin Researchers Design First Battery-Powered Cloaking Device
AUSTIN, Texas — Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have proposed the first design of a cloaking device that uses an external source of energy to significantly broaden its bandwidth of operation. Andrea Alù, associate professor at the Cockrell School of Engineering , and his team have proposed a design for an active cloak that draws energy from a battery, allowing objects to become undetectable to radio sensors over a greater range of frequencies.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.12.2013
Cells from the eye are inkjet printed for the first time
A group of researchers from the UK have used inkjet printing technology to successfully print cells taken from the eye for the very first time.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.12.2013
"Nanobiopsy" allows scientists to operate on living cells
Scientists have developed a device that can take a "biopsy" of a living cell, sampling minute volumes of its contents without killing it. Much research on molecular biology is carried out on populations of cells, giving an average result that ignores the fact that every cell is different. Techniques for studying single cells usually destroy them, making it impossible to look at changes over time.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.12.2013
Novel Genetic mutations discovered that cause neuro-muscular disease in children
Novel Genetic mutations discovered that cause neuro-muscular disease in children
Mutations in a gene causing mixed neurological and muscular disease in children have been found for the first time. Researchers at UCL and the University of Leeds have identified an entirely novel mechanism responsible for a childhood onset neuromuscular diseases with associated brain involvement. The research identified mutations of the gene MICU1 in a group of children affected by this previously undescribed condition, and provides the first evidence that a defective MICU1 gene can cause disease 'in man'.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.12.2013
Research backs risk-reduction surgery for ovarian cancer
17 Dec 2013 A study by Manchester scientists backs preventative surgery to improve survival for women who are at greater risk of getting ovarian cancer and suggests it appears helpful for women at risk of getting breast cancer because of genetic faults. Women who carry, a fault in one of two high-risk genes known as BRCA1 or BRCA2, have an increased risk of dying from breast and/or ovarian cancer.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 17.12.2013
Scientists win funding to work with industry to develop sustainable chemicals, energy, medicines and food
Scientists win funding to work with industry to develop sustainable chemicals, energy, medicines and food
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue. Durham scientists win funding to work with industry to develop sustainable chemicals, energy, medicines and food Scientists at Durham University have won access to £45 million in Government funding to work with industry on new advances in biotechnology.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.12.2013
Changes in proteins may predict ALS progression
HERSHEY, Pa. Measuring changes in certain proteins - called biomarkers - in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis may better predict the progression of the disease, according to scientists at Penn State College of Medicine. ALS is often referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurological disease in which the brain loses its ability to control movement as motor neurons degenerate.

Life Sciences - 17.12.2013
Study confirms a gene linked to Asperger Syndrome and empathy
Scientists have confirmed that variations in a particular gene play a key role in the autism spectrum condition known as Asperger Syndrome. They have also found that variations in the same gene are also linked to differences in empathy levels in the general population. This study confirms that variation in GABRB3 is linked not just to Asperger Syndrome but to individual differences in empathy in the population.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.12.2013
Team uses cells to expand nature's repertoire
Team uses cells to expand nature’s repertoire
Using a cell's own internal machinery, Yale researchers have produced proteins not found in nature that can cause cancer in mice, they report Dec. 16 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study not only sheds light on the way cancers may form, but also illustrates a new and efficient method to produce novel proteins that can be used for a variety of research, industrial, and medical purposes.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 16.12.2013
Shedding new light on leaf formation
A research project studying the biology of plants has shed new light on the mechanisms that control the placement and arrangement of leaves. The new insights revealed by the study could help to inform the way in which we select and grow different varieties of crops in the future. Co-author of the study Dr Etienne Farcot , at The University of Nottingham, said: "With a world population of seven billion and growing, ensuring global food security is one of the major challenges of modern society.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 16.12.2013
New recipe for novel proteins
New recipe for novel proteins
Yale researchers have discovered a targeted way to make proteins not generally found in nature by expanding the information encrypted in the genetic code. Working with bacteria, the Yale team rewrote most of the genetic instructions that encode all 20 amino acids - the building blocks of any protein - to create a specific, 21 st amino acid, researchers report in the January 2014 issue of the journal Angewandte Chemie.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2013
Double meaning in genetic code
Double meaning in genetic code
University of Washington Posted under: Health and Medicine , News Releases , Research , Science , Technology Scientists have discovered a second code hiding within DNA. This second code contains information that changes how scientists read the instructions contained in DNA and interpret mutations to make sense of health and disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2013
Speeding up gene discovery
New gene-editing system enables large-scale studies of gene function. Since the completion of the Human Genome Project, which identified nearly 20,000 protein-coding genes, scientists have been trying to decipher the roles of those genes. A new approach developed at MIT, the Broad Institute, and the Whitehead Institute should speed up the process by allowing researchers to study the entire genome at once.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2013
New gene discovery sheds more light on Alzheimer's risk
A research team from The University of Nottingham has helped uncover a second rare genetic mutation which strongly increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease in later life. In an international collaboration, the University's Translational Cell Sciences Human Genetics research group has pinpointed a rare coding variation in the Phospholipase D3 (PLD3) gene which is more common in people with late-onset Alzheimer's than non-sufferers.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.12.2013
Salmonella’s ’turn-ons’ revealed
Professor Jay Hinton: "These findings show that salmonella goes through a complex choreography of different stages while infecting different parts of our bodies” Scientists have used a new method to map the response of every salmonella gene to conditions in the human body, providing new insight into how the bacteria triggers infection.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.12.2013
Penn Medicine: Sleep-Deprived Mice Show Connections Among Lack of Shut-eye, Diabetes, Age
Penn Medicine: Sleep-Deprived Mice Show Connections Among Lack of Shut-eye, Diabetes, Age
Sleep, or the lack of it, seems to affect just about every aspect of human physiology. Yet, the molecular pathways through which sleep deprivation wreaks its detrimental effects on the body remain poorly understood. Although numerous studies have looked at the consequences of sleep deprivation on the brain, comparatively few have directly tested its effects on peripheral organs.

Life Sciences - 12.12.2013
University seeks participants for family depression study
12 December 2013 With Christmas just around the corner, a time where people can face emotional difficulties, stress or isolation, a University of Sydney study of close relatives is set to shed new light on one of Australia's most debilitating illnesses. Depression affects one in six Australians at some point in their lives, and there are one million of us living with the illness right now.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2013
Cancer ‘avalanche effect’ refuted
First, the number of chromosomes in a cell changes, then an avalanche of further mutations occur that transform the cell into a cancer cell, according to a well-known - but untested - theory. A research group at Lund University in Sweden has now shown that the theory is not correct and constitutes a dead end for research.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2013
Diabetes link with dementia to be examined
11 December 2013 It is well known that type 2 diabetes raises the risk of dementia. The reasons for this are less clear, but one explanation could be insulin resistance in the brain, according to Malin Wennström, a researcher at Lund University’s Molecular Memory Research Unit. She has received EUR 700,000 from the Swedish Research Council to investigate her theory.