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Life Sciences - Health - 11.12.2013
Researchers uncover mechanism controlling Tourette Syndrome tics
A mechanism in the brain which controls tics in children with Tourette Syndrome (TS) has been discovered by scientists at The University of Nottingham. The study, which has been published in the British Psychological Society's Journal of Neuropsychology , could herald new non-drug therapies to help young people with TS overcome the repetitive physical movements and vocal sounds which characterise their condition.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.12.2013
Groundbreaking discovery in deadly childhood cancer
A new study by Canadian researchers may pave the way for more effective treatment of an aggressive and deadly type of brain tumour, known as ETMR/ETANTR. The tumour, which is seen only in children under four, is almost always fatal, despite aggressive treatment. The study proposes a new model for how this brain tumour develops and suggests possible targets to investigate for novel therapies.

Mechanical Engineering - Life Sciences - 10.12.2013
Researchers at Penn Help Develop a Dynamic Model of Tissue Failure
Researchers at Penn Help Develop a Dynamic Model of Tissue Failure
The idea of growing replacement tissue to repair an organ, or to swap it out for an entirely new one, is rapidly transitioning from science fiction to fact. Tissue engineering techniques are improving in their ability to generate three-dimensional masses of cells and provide them with vascular systems for keeping them alive, but a more mathematically rigorous approach for designing these tissues is still needed.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.12.2013
Blood pressure drug could double up as first treatment for common form of dementia
A 4p per day drug for high blood pressure could become the first ever treatment for one of the most common forms of dementia within a decade, say two leading charities. The widely prescribed drug amlodipine has shown promising effects inápeople with vascular dementia, the most common type of dementia after Alzheimer's disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.12.2013
Bacteria tails implicated in gut inflammation
Bacteria tails implicated in gut inflammation
In healthy individuals, the only thing that separates the lining of the human gut from the some 100 trillion bacterial cells in the gastrointestinal tract is a layer of mucous. But when gut bacteria do come in with cells on the gut's surface, inflammation occurs, triggered by bacterial cell proteins.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.12.2013
New test for chronic blood cancers
Current test only identifies around 60 per cent of blood cancers; without new test, diagnosis in other 40 percent is difficult and requires multiple, often invasive, tests Not only will the identification of CALR lead to a new, less invasive test, we also hope that it can lead to new treatments Dr Jyoti Nangalia A simple blood test will soon be able to catch the vast majority of a group of chronic blood cancers, a new study reveals.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.12.2013
You are what your father eats
Mothers get all the attention. But a study led by McGill researcher Sarah Kimmins suggests that the father's diet before conception may play an equally important role in the health of their offspring. It also raises concerns about the long-term effects of current Western diets and of food insecurity.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.12.2013
Imperial responds to animal research investigation report
Imperial responds to animal research investigation report
Imperial has announced the immediate actions it is taking following the release of an independent report into animal care and welfare at the College. The College asked Professor Steve Brown in April 2013 to convene an independent committee to investigate how Imperial can improve to meet the highest standards in animal research and care internationally.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.12.2013
Penn Med Team Reports on Study of First 59 Leukemia Patients Who Received Personalized Cellular Therapy
Penn Med Team Reports on Study of First 59 Leukemia Patients Who Received Personalized Cellular Therapy
Three and a half years after beginning a clinical trial which demonstrated the first successful and sustained use of genetically engineered'T cells to fight leukemia, a research team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will today announce the latest results of studies involving both adults and children with advanced blood cancers that have failed to respond to standard therapies.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.12.2013
Activating Pathway Could Restart Hair Growth in Dormant Hair Follicles, Penn Study Suggests
A pathway known for its role in regulating adult stem cells has been shown to be important for hair follicle proliferation, but contrary to previous studies, is not required within hair follicle stem cells for their survival, according to researchers with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.12.2013
Probiotic Therapy Alleviates Autism-like Behaviors in Mice
Probiotic Therapy Alleviates Autism-like Behaviors in Mice
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is diagnosed when individuals exhibit characteristic behaviors that include repetitive actions, decreased social interactions, and impaired communication. Curiously, many individuals with ASD also suffer from gastrointestinal (GI) issues, such as abdominal cramps and constipation.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.12.2013
Gene expression changes with meditation
With evidence growing that meditation can have beneficial health effects, scientists have sought to understand how these practices physically affect the body. A new study by researchers in Wisconsin, Spain, and France reports the first evidence of specific molecular changes in the body following a period of mindfulness meditation.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.12.2013
Crop-infecting virus forces aphids to spread disease
Viruses alter plant biochemistry in order to manipulate visiting aphids into spreading infection The work started almost accidentally when about five years ago a student and I noticed that aphids became sick or died when confined on a virus-infected plant Dr John Carr University of Cambridge researchers have shown that viruses use aphids as pawns, discouraging the insects from permanently settling on already-infected crops and using this forced migration to spread infection to healthy vegetation.

Life Sciences - 04.12.2013
Repetitive sounds leave young brain starved for blood vessels
Repetitive sounds leave young brain starved for blood vessels
Repetitive sounds and seizures experienced in infancy can permanently hinder formation of blood vessels in the brains of mice, Yale University researchers report online Dec. 4 . The findings raise an intriguing question, note the researchers: Can similar stimuli during infancy in humans, such as fever-related seizures and lengthy exposure to blaring music cause a long-term reduction in brain blood vessels?

Health - Life Sciences - 04.12.2013
Estrogen: Not just produced by the ovaries
A UW-Madison research team reports today that the brain can produce and release estrogen - a discovery that may lead to a better understanding of hormonal changes observed from before birth throughout the entire aging process. The new research shows that the hypothalamus can directly control reproductive function in rhesus monkeys and very likely performs the same action in women.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.12.2013
Dads: how important are they?
Even with today's technology, it still takes both a male and a female to make a baby. But is it important for both parents to raise that child? Many studies have outlined the value of a mother, but few have clearly defined the importance of a father, until now. New findings from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) show that the absence of a father during critical growth periods, leads to impaired social and behavioural abilities in adults.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.12.2013
Omega-3 dietary supplements pass blood-brain barrier
Omega-3 dietary supplements pass blood-brain barrier
New research from Karolinska Institutet shows that omega-3 fatty acids in dietary supplements can cross the blood brain barrier in people with Alzheimer's disease, affecting known markers for both the disease itself and inflammation. The findings are presented in the Journal of Internal Medicine, and strengthen the evidence that omega-3 may benefit certain forms of this seriously debilitating disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.12.2013
Shark, human proteins are surprisingly similar
Shark, human proteins are surprisingly similar
When great white gene shark genes were compared with humans' and zebrafish (shown here), it was found their genes were surprisingly similar to humans'. Despite widespread fascination with sharks, the world's oldest ocean predators have long been a genetic mystery. The first deep dive into a great white shark's genetic code has fished up big surprises behind a design so effective it has barely changed since before dinosaurs roamed.

Life Sciences - 03.12.2013
Signalers vs. strong silent types: Sparrows exude personalities during fights
Signalers vs. strong silent types: Sparrows exude personalities during fights
University of Washington Like humans, some song sparrows are more effusive than others, at least when it comes to defending their territories. New findings from the University of Washington show that consistent individual differences exist not only for how aggressive individual song sparrows are but also for how much they use their signals to communicate their aggressive intentions.

Life Sciences - 02.12.2013
Koalas' low-pitched voice explained by unique organ
Koalas’ low-pitched voice explained by unique organ
Koalas' low-pitched voice explained by unique organ The pitch of male koalas' mating calls is about 20 times lower than it should be, given the Australian marsupial's relatively small size, University of Sussex research reveals. Dr Benjamin Charlton and Dr David Reby, reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on December 2 have discovered the koalas' secret: they have a specialised sound-producing organ that has never before been seen in any other land-dwelling mammal.