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Results 941 - 960 of 1074.


Life Sciences - Health - 14.02.2013
Chronic pain alters DNA marking in the brain
Injuries that result in chronic pain, such as limb injuries, and those unrelated to the brain are associated with epigenetic changes in the brain which persist months after the injury, according to researchers at McGill University. Epigenetics explores how the environment - including diet, exposure to contaminants and social conditions such as poverty - can have a long-term impact on the activity of our genes.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.02.2013
Calcium is the initial trigger in our immune response to healing
Calcium is the initial trigger in our immune response to healing
For the first time scientists studying the cellular processes underlying the body's response to healing have revealed how a flash of calcium is the very first step in repairing damaged tissue. The findings, published in Current Biology , could lead to new therapies that speed up the healing process following injury or surgery.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.02.2013
Mailman School Study Suggests Folic Acid Supplements May Reduce Risk of Autism
Large study in Norway finds early timing of supplements is critical Prenatal folic acid supplements appear to reduce the risk for autistic spectrum disorders, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) . The report in JAMA emerged from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and its sub-study of autism, the Autism Birth Cohort (ABC) Study.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.02.2013
March of the superbugs
March of the superbugs
We can't predict how these bacterial strains will evolve - they could become more resistant, more virulent or better able to jump between species." —Dr Mark Holmes Every so often, research laboratories and hospitals testing patients for the superbug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have come across an oddity: a strain that appeared to be MRSA because it was resistant to antibiotics but one that tested negative with the 'gold standard' molecular test.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.02.2013
Penn Vet Team Uncovers a Pathway That Stimulates Bone Growth
Penn Vet Team Uncovers a Pathway That Stimulates Bone Growth
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine have discovered that a protein called Jagged-1 stimulates human stem cells to differentiate into bone-producing cells. This protein could help both human and animal patients heal from bone fractures faster and may form the basis of treatments for a rare metabolic condition called Alagille syndrome.

Life Sciences - 12.02.2013
“Get off my lawn:” Song sparrows escalate territorial threats - with video
Territorial song sparrows use increasingly threatening signals to ward off trespassing rivals. First an early warning that matches the intruder's song, then wing waving - a bird's version of "flipping the bird” - as the dispute heats up, and finally, if all other signals have failed, attack.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.02.2013
Genes for autism and schizophrenia only active in developing brains
Genes linked to autism and schizophrenia are only switched on during the early stages of brain development, according to a study in mice led by researchers at the University of Oxford. This new study adds to the evidence that autism and schizophrenia are neurodevelopmental disorders, a term describing conditions that originate during early brain development.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.02.2013
Scientist uncovers the reproductive workings of a harvester ant dynasty
Scientist uncovers the reproductive workings of a harvester ant dynasty
Stanford Report, February 11, 2013 For the first time, scientists have measured how successfully a queen ant establishes new colonies. The work by Stanford researchers revealed that the queen was still reproducing several decades after mating. Ants are just about everywhere you look, and yet it's largely unknown how they manage to be so ubiquitous.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.02.2013
C-section, formula feeding affect babies' gut bacteria
C-section, formula feeding affect babies’ gut bacteria
Caesarean section delivery and formula feeding appear to change the bacteria footprint in babies' guts, according to new findings published today and led by a medical researcher at the University of Alberta. Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry researcher Anita Kozyrskyj and her colleagues across Canada published their findings in the Canadian Medical Association Journal .

Health - Life Sciences - 11.02.2013
Gene thought to be linked to Alzheimer's is marker for only mild impairment
Gene thought to be linked to Alzheimer’s is marker for only mild impairment
Defying the widely held belief that a specific gene is the biggest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, two Cornell developmental psychologists and their colleagues report that people with that gene are more likely to develop mild cognitive impairment - but not Alzheimer's. The study suggests that older adults with healthy brain function can get genetic tests to predict increased risk of future mild cognitive impairment.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.02.2013
Technique moves practical Alzheimer diagnosis one step closer to reality
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health are moving closer to a significant milepost in the battle against Alzheimer's disease: identifying the first signs of decline in the brain. After years of frustrating failure to stop late-stage Alzheimer's, it's essential to find and treat the mild stages, says Sterling Johnson , professor of geriatrics.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.02.2013
Newly identified natural protein blocks HIV, other deadly viruses
A team of UCLA-led researchers has identified a protein with broad virus-fighting properties that potentially could be used as a weapon against deadly human pathogenic viruses such as HIV, Ebola, Rift Valley Fever, Nipah and others designated "priority pathogens" for national biosecurity purposes by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.02.2013
Two drugs better than one to treat most deadly skin cancer
Two drugs better than one to treat most deadly skin cancer
Scientists at Cancer Research UK's Paterson Institute at The University of Manchester showed that lung cancer drugs such as gefitinib (Iressa) can override resistance to new targeted therapies for melanoma, called BRAF inhibitors. The first BRAF inhibitor, vemurafenib (Zelboraf), was approved for patients on the NHS in 2012, and others are currently in development.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 11.02.2013
Search for the first ‘man’s best friend’
Scientists at Durham University hope to find out when and where dogs first became man's best friend by examining DNA and bones from ancient remains - of wolves as well as dogs. The earliest conclusive evidence for domestic dogs is about 14,000 years ago, but some theories suggest dogs could have been domesticated as long as 35,000 years ago.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.02.2013
24 new genes for short-sightedness identified
An international team of scientists led by King's College London has discovered 24 new genes that cause refractive errors and myopia (short-sightedness). Myopia is a major cause of blindness and visual impairment worldwide, and currently there is no cure. These findings, published today in the journal Nature Genetic s, reveal genetic causes of the trait, which could lead to finding better treatments or ways of preventing the condition in the future.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.02.2013
Genes for autism and schizophrenia only active in developing brains
Genes for autism and schizophrenia only active in developing brains
Genes linked to autism and schizophrenia are only switched on during the early stages of brain development, according to a collaboration between researchers at Imperial College London, the University of Oxford and King's College London. This new study adds to the evidence that autism and schizophrenia are neurodevelopmental disorders, a term describing conditions that originate during early brain development.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.02.2013
24 new genes for nearsightedness identified
24 new genes for nearsightedness identified
Scientists have discovered 24 new genes that cause refractive errors and myopia - an important cause of blindness and visual impairment worldwide, which has no cure to date. The findings reveal genetic causes of the trait, and this may help in finding a solution. Thirty per cent of Western populations and up to 80 per cent of Asians suffer from myopia (nearsightedness).

Health - Life Sciences - 10.02.2013
Old drug may point the way to new treatments for diabetes and obesity
Old drug may point the way to new treatments for diabetes and obesity
ANN ARBOR-Researchers at the University of Michigan's Life Sciences Institute have found that amlexanox, an off-patent drug currently prescribed for the treatment of asthma and other uses, also reverses obesity, diabetes and fatty liver in mice. The findings from the lab of Alan Saltiel, the Mary Sue Coleman director of the Life Sciences Institute, are scheduled to be published online Feb.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.02.2013
Nature counting on global unity in preventing biodiversity loss
Biodiversity is vital to the survival of the human race. We rely on biodiversity for medicine, the growth of our crops, the purity of our water systems and the durability of our rainforests. But biodiversity is diminishing at an alarming rate. It is estimated that 0.1% of the world's species become extinct every year.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.02.2013
Mystery bleeding disorders could be unravelled by new research efforts at University of Birmingham
Platelet disorders are heavily underdiagnosed, little understood and cannot be cured. University of Birmingham researchers and the Birmingham Platelet Group are running a UK-wide clinical trial 'Genotyping and platelet phenotyping' (GAPP) (1) funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF). The trial includes lab research by BHF-funded scientist Yotis Senis in an effort to better identify patients and potentially to develop new treatments.