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Health - Life Sciences - 08.02.2013
Deadly virus discovered in bats also jumps species
Deadly virus discovered in bats also jumps species
Four new forms of hantavirus, one of the most virulent pathogens transmitted from animals to humans, have been identified by international research contributed to by the University of Sydney. The existence of these newly described hantaviruses in bats and other insect-eating carnivores has challenged the conventional view that they originated in rodents.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 08.02.2013
Simple Computer Models Unravel Genetic Stress Reactions in Cells
Simple Computer Models Unravel Genetic Stress Reactions in Cells
Integrated biological and computational methods provide insight into why genes are activated. The combined, data-driven approach that includes validation allows researchers to systematically determine when models are too simple, too complex or just right-the "Goldilocks" approach. Many questions arise when two identical twins raised in the same home—fed the same, nurtured the same way—follow disparate paths.

Life Sciences - 07.02.2013
Our furry, scampering common ancestor
A massive International research collaboration says the common ancestor of placental mammals - a group that includes humans - was a scampering, insect-eating creature that appeared after extinction of dinosaurs. The University of Toronto Scarborough's Mary Silcox , assistant professor of anthropology, was part of the team that reconstructed the family tree of placental mammals - a diverse group that includes cats, dogs, horses and humans.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.02.2013
Cellular alchemy caught in action
One of the most critical biological advances in the past decade was the discovery that the introduction of four simple genetic factors can turn a fully mature adult cell back into an embryonic-like state, a process called reprogramming. Now, Yale School of Medicine researchers have created a video that shows in great detail how this transformation takes place.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.02.2013
Heart valve disease linked to unusual cholesterol
Researchers have discovered a gene associated with a form of cholesterol that increases the risk of developing aortic stenosis, the most common form of heart valve disease, by more than half. This international study, involving the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC), is the first of its kind to uncover a genetic link with aortic valve disease - a condition that affects more than 5 million people in North America.

Life Sciences - 06.02.2013
CT scanner helps answer 150-year-old question of lung evolution
CT scanner helps answer 150-year-old question of lung evolution
Scan of a Florida gar: down through the spine, out to the inside surface of the interlocking sheath of heavy scales that encases a gar, and then into the central chamber of the gar's swim bladder, traveling all the way to the front of the swim bladder, just behind the head. One of the great problems of evolution is to understand how the major features of organisms have changed over great swaths of time.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.02.2013
Medical Center Study Points to Possible Cause and Treatment for Non-Familial Parkinson's
Findings implicate two genetic variants that disrupt protein sorting in neurons New York, NY - Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have identified a protein trafficking defect within brain cells that may underlie common non-familial forms of Parkinson's disease. The defect is at a point of convergence for the action of at least three different genes that had been implicated in prior studies of Parkinson's disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.02.2013
Bacteria detect and ingest new DNA
Bacteria detect and ingest new DNA
A new study by researchers at Imperial College London has identified how Neisseria meningitidis, a type of bacteria that causes life-threatening meningitis and septicaemia, is able to detect and ingest new DNA and generate different strains. One way in which bacteria overcome our immune defences is by generating new variants that either go undetected, or are more resistant to antibiotics and can cause serious disease outbreaks.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.02.2013
Finding challenges accepted view of MS: Unexpectedly, damaged nerve fibers survive
Multiple sclerosis, a brain disease that affects over 400,000 Americans, causes movement difficulties and many neurologic symptoms. MS has two key elements: The nerves that direct muscular movement lose their electrical insulation (the myelin sheath) and cannot transmit signals as effectively. And many of the long nerve fibers, called axons, degenerate.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.02.2013
Can you predict how a disease will spread in a population?
Can you predict how a disease will spread in a population?
How, when and where a pathogen is transmitted between two individuals in a population is crucial in understanding and predicting how a disease will spread. New research has laid the foundation for a new generation of zoonotic disease spreading models, which could allow for more targeted prevention strategies.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.02.2013
New treatment target on the horizon for stillbirth and liver problems
New treatment target on the horizon for stillbirth and liver problems
A discovery by researchers at Imperial College London suggests a possible new target for treating a serious complication of pregnancy called obstetric cholestasis. Obstetric cholestasis is a liver condition, which causes a build-up of toxic bile acids in the bloodstream. It occurs in one in 140 pregnancies in the UK and can result in stillbirth.

Life Sciences - 05.02.2013
Research suggests meerkat predator-scanning behaviour is altruistic
Research suggests meerkat predator-scanning behaviour is altruistic
These results are exciting, as they show us that individuals are not just on the look-out for their own safety, but that the protection of other group members is another motivation for these behaviours." —Peter Santema, a PhD student at the University of Cambridge's Department of Zoology In order to spot potential predators, adult meerkats often climb to a higher vantage point or stand on their hind legs.

Life Sciences - Religions - 04.02.2013
Christianity influencing biodiversity in the Amazon, Stanford scientists find
Christianity influencing biodiversity in the Amazon, Stanford scientists find
Stanford Report, February 5, 2013 The introduction of Christianity has changed the hunting habits of indigenous people in the Amazon. While some new practices could benefit animals, others could put populations at risk. Religious missionaries have been transforming the belief systems of indigenous peoples deep within the Amazon since the 1700s, but the outsiders might be influencing more than just prayer.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.02.2013
Some cancer mutations slow tumor growth
Surprising result suggests that enhancing these mutations' impact could offer a new way to treat cancer. A typical cancer cell has thousands of mutations scattered throughout its genome and hundreds of mutated genes. However, only a handful of those genes, known as drivers, are responsible for cancerous traits such as uncontrolled growth.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 04.02.2013
Response and recovery in the brain may predict well-being
It has long been known that the part of the brain called the amygdala is responsible for recognition of a threat and knowing whether to fight or flee from the danger. Now, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, scientists at the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Waisman Center are watching the duration of the amygdala response in the brains of healthy people when exposed to negative images.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.02.2013
Beyond stem cells: U-M's Yamashita receives Keck award
Beyond stem cells: U-M’s Yamashita receives Keck award
ANN ARBOR -Yukiko Yamashita of the University of Michigan's Life Sciences Institute received an award from the W.M. Keck Foundation to support a research project called "Uncovering the role of non-random chromosome segregation during asymmetric stem cell division." Yamashita is a research assistant professor at LSI and an assistant professor in the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology at the U-M Medical School.

Physics - Life Sciences - 04.02.2013
Researchers improve quantum-dot performance
New production method could enable everything from more efficient computer displays to enhanced biomedical testing. Quantum dots - tiny particles that emit light in a dazzling array of glowing colors - have the potential for many applications, but have faced a series of hurdles to improved performance.

Physics - Life Sciences - 04.02.2013
Quantum microscope for living biology
Quantum microscope for living biology
A team of Australian scientists has developed a powerful microscope using the laws of quantum mechanics to probe the inner workings of living cells. The team, a collaboration between The University of Queensland and the Australian National University, believe their microscope could lead to a better understanding of the basic components of life and eventually allow quantum mechanics to be probed at a macroscopic level.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.02.2013
Target 'super-spreaders' to stop Hepatitis C
Target 'super-spreaders' to stop Hepatitis C
Each intravenous drug user contracting Hepatitis C is likely to infect around 20 other people with the virus, half of these transmissions occurring in the first two years after the user is first infected, a new study estimates. The work, led by researchers from Oxford University, suggests that early diagnosis and treatment of Hepatitis C in intravenous drug users could prevent many transmissions by limiting the impact of these 'super-spreaders' (a highly infectious person who spreads a disease to many other people).

Life Sciences - Health - 01.02.2013
Discovery in synthetic biology a step closer to new industrial revolution
Discovery in synthetic biology a step closer to new industrial revolution
Scientists report that they have developed a method that cuts down the time it takes to make new 'parts' for microscopic biological factories from 2 days to only 6 hours. The scientists, from Imperial College London, say their research brings them another step closer to a new kind of industrial revolution, where parts for these biological factories could be mass-produced.