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Health - Life Sciences - 31.01.2013
Diabetes distresses bone marrow stem cells by damaging their microenvironment
Diabetes distresses bone marrow stem cells by damaging their microenvironment
New research has shown the presence of a disease affecting small blood vessels, known as microangiopathy, in the bone marrow of diabetic patients. While it is well known that microangiopathy is the cause of renal damage, blindness and heart attacks in patients with diabetes, this is the first time that a reduction of the smallest blood vessels has been shown in bone marrow, the tissue contained inside the bones and the main source of stem cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.01.2013
Zebrafish eyed as answer to restoring vision
Zebrafish eyed as answer to restoring vision
Zebrafish, a staple of genetic research, may hold the answer to repairing damaged retinas and returning eyesight to people. University of Alberta researchers discovered that a zebrafish's stem cells can selectively regenerate damaged photoreceptor cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.01.2013
Scientists identify culprit in obesity-associated high blood pressure
Scientists identify culprit in obesity-associated high blood pressure
Obesity and its related conditions such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke are among the most challenging of today's healthcare concerns. Together, they constitute the biggest killer in western society. New findings, published in Cell , have identified a target that could hold the key to developing safe therapies to treat obesity and its associated conditions.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.01.2013
Cells can communicate through physical barriers
Cells can communicate through physical barriers
Scientists at UCLA and Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science have discovered a possible method by which cancer cells and dying cells communicate with nearby normal nerve cells without being physically connected to them.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.01.2013
New stroke gene discovery could lead to tailored treatments
A study led by King's College London has identified a new genetic variant associated with stroke. By exploring the genetic variants linked with blood clotting - a process that can lead to a stroke - scientists have discovered a gene which is associated with large vessel and cardioembolic stroke but has no connection to small vessel stroke.

Life Sciences - Environment - 31.01.2013
The effective collective: Grouping could ensure animals find their way in a changing environment
The effective collective: Grouping could ensure animals find their way in a changing environment
For social animals such as schooling fish, the loss of their numbers to human activity could eventually threaten entire populations, according to a finding that such animals rely heavily on grouping to effectively navigate their environment. Princeton University researchers report that collective intelligence is vital to certain animals' ability to evaluate and respond to their environment.

Life Sciences - 31.01.2013
Scientists using holiday snaps to identify whale sharks
Scientists using holiday snaps to identify whale sharks
Holidaymakers' photos could help scientists track the movements of giant endangered sharks living in the waters of the Indian Ocean. A new study, led by a researcher from Imperial College London, is the first to show that these publically sourced photographs are suitable for use in conservation work.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 31.01.2013
Mapping the living cell
New technique pinpoints protein locations, helping scientists figure out their functions. To get a clear picture of what's happening inside a cell, scientists need to know the locations of thousands of proteins and other molecules. MIT chemists have now developed a technique that can tag all of the proteins in a particular region of a cell, allowing them to more accurately map those proteins.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.01.2013
More Links Found Between Schizophrenia and Cardiovascular Disease
A new study, to be published in the Feb. 7, 2013 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics , expands and deepens the biological and genetic links between cardiovascular disease and schizophrenia. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of premature death among schizophrenia patients, who die from heart and blood vessel disorders at a rate double that of persons without the mental disorder.

Environment - Life Sciences - 30.01.2013
Work needed to make algal biofuel viable
Work needed to make algal biofuel viable
Though biofuels from algae hold great promise, Cornell researchers find that more innovation is needed to make the technology economically and energetically viable at a commercial scale. To date, researchers have struggled to determine if the nonrenewable energy it takes to make a gallon of algal biofuel will be equal to, less than or greater than the energy produced.

Physics - Life Sciences - 30.01.2013
Research News Briefs
Research News Briefs
A digest of new and noteworthy research to complement UC Berkeley press releases. A complete archive of all campus research news is available online.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 30.01.2013
Aztec Conquest Altered Genetics among Early Mexico Inhabitants, New DNA Study Shows
AUSTIN, Texas — For centuries, the fate of the original Otomí inhabitants of Xaltocan, the capital of a pre-Aztec Mexican city-state, has remained unknown. Researchers have long wondered whether they assimilated with the Aztecs or abandoned the town altogether. According to new anthropological research from The University of Texas at Austin, Wichita State University and Washington State University, the answers may lie in DNA.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.01.2013
UCLA findings buck conventional wisdom about how stress-response protein works
UCLA findings buck conventional wisdom about how stress-response protein works
UCLA researchers, in a finding that runs counter to conventional wisdom, have discovered for the first time that a gene thought to express a stress-response protein in all cells that come under stress instead expresses the protein only in specific cell types. The research team, from the Jules Stein Eye Institute at UCLA and the UCLA Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, focused on αB-Crystallin, one of a class of molecules know

Life Sciences - Health - 30.01.2013
Discovery of sexual mating in fungi that causes 400,000 deaths per year could provide insights on how to prevent and treat infections
News Release MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (01/30/2013) —Like many fungi and one-celled organisms, Candida albicans , a normally harmless microbe that can turn deadly, has long been thought to reproduce without sexual mating. But a new study by Judith Berman and colleagues at the University of Minnesota and Tel Aviv University shows that C. albicans is capable of sexual reproduction.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.01.2013
Scientists Help Map Molecular Architecture of Organelle Critical to Hearing
Scientists Help Map Molecular Architecture of Organelle Critical to Hearing
To learn how something works in biology, it pays to start really small. Take this research for example: A team that includes Berkeley Lab scientists has identified and mapped the locations of many of the proteins that compose a hair bundle, which is an organelle that sprouts from hair cells in the inner ear.

Life Sciences - 30.01.2013
Female deer take control during the mating season
A new study provides the first evidence of polyandry - when females choose to mate with more than one male - in female fallow deer. According to a team of scientists from Queen Mary, University of London, UWE Hartpury, and University College Dublin, female fallow deer play an active role in selecting their mates, with a consistent proportion (on average 12 per cent) choosing to mate with multiple males each year.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.01.2013
Itching for New Help for Eczema: Recently Identified Immune Cells Possible Therapeutic Target
Itching for New Help for Eczema: Recently Identified Immune Cells Possible Therapeutic Target
The increasing incidence of allergic skin diseases, and the accompanying economic burden and heightened risk of developing other allergic conditions, have spurred researchers to look for better ways to control these immune system-based disorders. Atopic dermatitis, more commonly called eczema, now affects 10 to 20 percent of children in the United States and direct health-care costs exceed $3 billion, according to the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.01.2013
Gene linked to more severe flu in Chinese populations
Gene linked to more severe flu in Chinese populations
A genetic variant which explains why Chinese populations may be more vulnerable to H1N1 swine flu has been found by researchers at the University of Oxford and Beijing Capital Medical University. This finding could help identify those at high risk of severe infection and help prioritise those in highest need of treatment.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 29.01.2013
Changes in epigenome control tomato ripening
Changes in epigenome control tomato ripening
Everyone loves a juicy, perfectly ripened tomato, and scientists have long sought ways to control the ripening process to improve fruit quality and prevent spoilage. A new study by researchers at the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research (BTI) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service (ARS), both on the Cornell campus, reveals that epigenetics, a set of chemical changes to a plant's DNA, plays a pivotal role in tomato ripening, signaling to the fruit when the time is right to redden.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.01.2013
New findings into conquering influenza
Researchers from the University of Melbourne and The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI) have discovered a new protein that protects against viral infections such as influenza. As influenza spreads through the northern hemisphere winter, Linda Wakim and her colleagues in the Laboratory of Jose Villadangos from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, believe they have a new clue to why some people fight infections better than others.