news 2013

« BACK

Psychology



Results 41 - 60 of 84.


Pedagogy - Psychology - 24.06.2013
Giving children non-verbal clues about words boosts vocabularies
The clues that parents give toddlers about words can make a big difference in how deep their vocabularies are when they enter school, new research at the University of Chicago shows. By using words to reference objects in the visual environment, parents can help young children learn new words, according to the research.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 21.06.2013
Penn Psychologists Show that Quality Matters More Than Quantity for Word Learning
Penn Psychologists Show that Quality Matters More Than Quantity for Word Learning
Several studies have shown that how much parents say to their children when they are very young is a good predictor of children's vocabulary at the point when they begin school. In turn, a child's vocabulary size at school entry strongly predicts level of success throughout schooling even into high school and college.

Art and Design - Psychology - 11.06.2013
Perfect pitch may not be absolute after all
People who think they have perfect pitch may not be as in tune as they think, according to a new University of Chicago study in which people failed to notice a gradual change in pitch while listening to music. When tested afterward, people with perfect, or absolute pitch, thought notes made out of tune at the end of a song were in tune, while notes that were in tune at the beginning sounded out of tune.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 31.05.2013
Facebook profiles raise users’ self-esteem and affect behavior
A Facebook profile is an ideal version of self, full of photos and posts curated for the eyes of family, friends and acquaintances. A new study shows that this version of self can provide beneficial psychological effects and influence behavior. Catalina Toma , a UW-Madison assistant professor of communication arts, used the Implicit Association Test to measure Facebook users' self-esteem after they spent time looking at their profiles, the first time the social psychology research tool has been used to examine the effects of Facebook.

Psychology - 23.05.2013
Don’t (use the term) ’panic’, say psychologists
Don't (use the term) 'panic', say psychologists New research from the universities of Sussex and Brighton looks at popular representations of crowd behaviour in disasters that are often wrongly characterised as 'panic'. The study suggests that the term is too loaded and does not accurately describe what actually happens in such situations.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 10.05.2013
Brain system for emotional self-control
Brain system for emotional self-control
Different brain areas are activated when we choose for ourselves to suppress an emotion, compared to situations where we are instructed to inhibit an emotion, according a new study from the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Ghent University. In this study, published in Brain Structure and Function , the researchers scanned the brains of healthy participants and found that key brain systems were activated when choosing for oneself to suppress an emotion.

Health - Psychology - 10.05.2013
Risky business - new study seeks to probe gambling mindset
10 May 2013 Problem gambling imposes serious costs on the community but we understand surprisingly little about how individuals perceive the risks associated with gambling. "Research shows that problem gamblers experience significantly more harm than other gamblers, yet somehow also remain more optimistic in their expectations," said Michael Spurrier, a PhD candidate in the School of Psychology at the University of Sydney, who is researching how gamblers perceive risk.

Health - Psychology - 02.05.2013
Mental health network aims to promote brain disorder discoveries
A team of academics from the University of Glasgow and University of Strathclyde have formed a network designed to drive forward mental health breakthroughs. The Glasgow Psychosis Research Network will bring together expertise from a range of organisations, with the aim of improving the diagnosis and treatment of mental health condition.

Health - Psychology - 30.04.2013
Teen girls less successful than boys at quitting meth in UCLA pilot research study
Teen girls less successful than boys at quitting meth in UCLA pilot research study
A UCLA-led study of adolescents receiving treatment for methamphetamine dependence has found that girls are more likely to continue using the drug during treatment than boys, suggesting that new approaches are needed for treating meth abuse among teen girls. Results from the study, conducted by the UCLA Center for Behavioral and Addiction Medicine and the community-based substance abuse treatment program Behavioral Health Services Inc., are published in the April edition of the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 23.04.2013
Predicting aggression through perspiration
Infants who sweat less in response to scary situations at age one show more physical and verbal aggression at age three, according to new research by Cardiff University. Lower levels of sweat, as measured by skin conductance activity (SCA), have been linked with conduct disorder and aggressive behaviour in children and adolescents.

Health - Psychology - 19.04.2013
Early cognitive behavioural therapy reduces risk of psychosis
19 Apr 2013 Young people seeking help who are at high risk of developing psychosis could significantly reduce their chances of going on to develop a full-blown psychotic illness by getting early access to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), new research shows. Researchers from The University of Manchester found the risk of developing psychosis was more than halved for those receiving CBT at six, 12 and 18-24 months after treatment started.

Health - Psychology - 15.04.2013
Groundbreaking study to transform service users’ involvement in mental health care
PA 113/13 A groundbreaking study could help to revolutionise the way in which mental health service users and their carers plan their care. The research is a collaboration between The University of Nottingham's School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, the University of Manchester, Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust and Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust.

Psychology - Career - 11.04.2013
Women active in feminist causes harassed more at work
ANN ARBOR-Working women who engage in feminist activism report more experiences of gender harassment on the job, regardless of whether or not they identify themselves as feminists, a new University of Michigan study indicates. "A woman who personally adopts the feminist label may not 'out' herself as such to others," said Kathryn Holland, the study's lead author and a graduate student in women's studies and psychology.

Career - Psychology - 03.04.2013
Diversity programs give illusion of corporate fairness, study shows
Diversity training programs lead people to believe that work environments are fair even when given evidence of hiring, promotion or salary inequities, according to new findings by psychologists at the University of Washington and other universities. The study also revealed that participants, all of whom were white, were less likely to take discrimination complaints seriously against companies who had diversity programs.

Psychology - 27.03.2013
How anorexia and 'bigorexia' in men relates to perceptions of masculinity
How anorexia and ’bigorexia’ in men relates to perceptions of masculinity
Self-perceived masculinity is higher in men with muscle dysmorphia, popularly called 'bigorexia', than other gym users, while men with anorexia nervosa relate more strongly to feminine stereotypes, research contributed to by the University of Sydney has found. The findings are published in the Journal of Eating Disorders today.

Health - Psychology - 27.03.2013
Seeing happiness in ambiguous facial expressions reduces aggressive behaviour
Seeing happiness in ambiguous facial expressions reduces aggressive behaviour
Encouraging young people at high-risk of criminal offending and delinquency to see happiness rather than anger in facial expressions results in a decrease in their levels of anger and aggression, new research from the University of Bristol has found. The study, led by Professor Marcus Munaf˛ and Professor Ian Penton-Voak , explored the relationship between recognition of emotion in ambiguous facial expressions and aggressive thoughts and behaviour, both in healthy adults and in adolescent youth considered to be at high-risk of committing crime.

Mathematics - Psychology - 25.03.2013
On Gun Control, Citizens Support Politicians Who Point to Big Picture, not Specific Incidents, Study Finds
AUSTIN, Texas — As the nation continues to grapple with the long-simmering issue of gun control, solutions are stymied by heated debates. To effectively influence a divided America, elected officials must take a broad perspective rather than focusing on specific incidents, according to a new psychology study from The University of Texas at Austin.

Psychology - History / Archeology - 20.03.2013
Expression of emotion in books declined during 20th century, study finds
Expression of emotion in books declined during 20th century, study finds
The use of words with emotional content in books has steadily decreased throughout the last century, according to new research from the Universities of Bristol, Sheffield, and Durham. The study, published today in PLOS ONE also found a divergence between American and British English, with the former being more 'emotional' than the latter.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 20.03.2013
Sleep consolidates memories for competing tasks
Sleep plays an important role in the brain's ability to consolidate learning when two new potentially competing tasks are learned in the same day, research at the University of Chicago demonstrates. Other studies have shown that sleep consolidates learning for a new task. The new study, which measured starlings' ability to recognize new songs, shows that learning a second task can undermine the performance of a previously learned task.

Psychology - Computer Science - 20.03.2013
Expression of emotion in books declined during 20th century, study finds
The use of words with emotional content in books has steadily decreased throughout the last century, according to new research from the Universities of Sheffield, Bristol and Durham. The study, published today in PLOS ONE , also found a divergence between American and British English, with the former being more 'emotional' than the latter.