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Results 81 - 84 of 84.


Career - Psychology - 18.01.2013
Powerful people better at shaking off rebuffs, bonding with others
Powerful people better at shaking off rebuffs, bonding with others
Employees often tiptoe around their bosses for fear of offending them. But new research from UC Berkeley shows people in power have thicker skin than one might think. A UC Berkeley study has found that people in authority positions - whether at home or in the workplace – are quicker to recover from mild rejection, and will seek out social bonding opportunities even if they've been rebuffed.

Psychology - Economics / Business - 14.01.2013
If we go over the fiscal cliff, will people spend or save?
News Release Research from U of M Associate Professor of Marketing Vlad Griskevicius suggests childhood environments may hold the key Media Note: The APS journal Psychological Science is the highest ranked empirical journal in psychology. For a copy of the article "When the Economy Falters, Do People Spend or Save? Responses to Resource Scarcity Depend on Childhood Environments" and access to other Psychological Science research findings, please Anna Mikulak at 202-293-9300 or amikulak [a] psychologicalscience (p) org.

Health - Psychology - 08.01.2013
Family thought to play part in reducing stress for young Mexicans, study shows
Family thought to play part in reducing stress for young Mexicans, study shows
Marcela Raffaelli, a professor of human and community development at Illinois, is one of the co-authors on a study that found that families play a unique and powerful role in meeting the mental health needs of Mexican youth, especially during periods of stress. Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, Ill.

Health - Psychology - 08.01.2013
Mums may influence babies’ pain at routine vaccinations
Babies of first-time mums express more pain during routine vaccinations than those of experienced mothers, according to new research. The Durham University study suggests that first-time mothers' anxiety about the procedure has an effect on their babies. The researchers say babies' early experience of pain shapes their response to painful events later in life so reduction of anxiety in both mother and baby is important. The findings could also have implications for the number of children with incomplete immunisations and could therefore impose health risks to the child and society.