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Physics - Chemistry - 23.12.2014
World's most complex crystal simulated at U-Michigan
World’s most complex crystal simulated at U-Michigan
ANN ARBOR-The most complicated crystal structure ever produced in a computer simulation has been achieved by researchers at the University of Michigan. They say the findings help demonstrate how complexity can emerge from simple rules. Their "icosahedral quasicrystal" (eye-KO-suh-HE-druhl QUAZ-eye-cris-tahl) looks ordered to the eye, but has no repeating pattern.

Chemistry - Administration - 22.12.2014
Concerns raised about variable performance of some UK personal use breathalysers
The official UK-wide assessment of all university research, the Research Excellence Framework, found that Oxford has the largest volume of world-leading research in the country.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 22.12.2014
Mysteries of 'molecular machines' revealed
Mysteries of ’molecular machines’ revealed
Scientists are making it easier for pharmaceutical companies and researchers to see the detailed inner workings of molecular machines. "Understanding how all these machines work is the key to developing new therapeutics, for treating genetic disorders, and for developing new ways to make useful materials." EMBARGOED for Monday, December 22, 11 a.m. Eastern Time Phenix software uses X-ray diffraction spots to produce 3-D image LOS ALAMOS, N.M. Dec.

Chemistry - Physics - 19.12.2014
Making a Good Thing Better: Berkeley Lab Researchers Open a Possible Avenue to Better Electrolyte for Lithium Ion Batteries
Making a Good Thing Better: Berkeley Lab Researchers Open a Possible Avenue to Better Electrolyte for Lithium Ion Batteries
The lithium-ion batteries that mobilize our electronic devices need to be improved if they are to power electric vehicles or store electrical energy for the grid. Berkeley Lab researchers looking for a better understanding of liquid electrolyte may have found a pathway forward.

Chemistry - Physics - 17.12.2014
Ancient, hydrogen-rich waters discovered deep underground at locations around the world
Finding represents "a quantum change in our understanding" of how much of Earth's crust may be habitable, says world-renowned researcher A team of scientists led by the University of Toronto's Barbara Sherwood Lollar has mapped the location of hydrogen-rich waters found trapped kilometres beneath Earth's surface in rock fractures in Canada, South Africa and Scandinavia.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.12.2014
Scientists measure speedy electrons in silicon
The entire semiconductor industry, not to mention Silicon Valley, is built on the propensity of electrons in silicon to get kicked out of their atomic shells and become free. These mobile electrons are routed and switched though transistors, carrying the digital information that characterizes our age.

Chemistry - Agronomy / Food Science - 10.12.2014
Can organic crops compete with industrial agriculture?
A systematic overview of more than 100 studies comparing organic and conventional farming finds that the crop yields of organic agriculture are higher than previously thought. The study, conducted by UC Berkeley researchers, also found that certain practices could further shrink the productivity gap between organic crops and conventional farming.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 09.12.2014
Now researchers can see how unfolded proteins move in the cell
Now researchers can see how unfolded proteins move in the cell
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. When a large protein unfolds in transit through a cell, it slows down and can get stuck in traffic. Using a specialized microscope - a sort of cellular traffic camera - University of Illinois chemists now can watch the way the unfolded protein diffuses. Studying the relationship between protein folding and transport could provide great insight into protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's.

Chemistry - Electroengineering - 08.12.2014
Chemists create ’artificial chemical evolution’ for the first time
Scientists have taken an important step towards the possibility of creating synthetic life with the development of a form of artificial evolution in a simple chemistry set without DNA. A team from the University of Glasgow's School of Chemistry report in a new paper today (Monday 8 December) on how they have managed to create an evolving chemical system for the first time.

Chemistry - Physics - 01.12.2014
New chemical sponge has potential to lessen the carbon footprint of oil industry
UK scientists have discovered a ground-breaking technique with the potential to dramatically reduce the amount of energy used in the refinement of crude oil. Professor Martin Schröder and Dr Sihai Yang from The University of Nottingham have led a multi-disciplinary team of scientists from Nottingham, the Science and Technology Facilities Council's (STFC) ISIS Neutron Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Diamond Light Source, to discover a porous material that works like a chemical sponge to separate a number of important gases from mixtures generated during crude oil refinement.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 01.12.2014
World’s first artificial enzymes created using synthetic biology
Enzymes made from artificial molecules which do not occur anywhere in nature have been shown to trigger chemical reactions in the lab, challenging existing views about the conditions that are needed to enable life to happen. Our assumptions about what is required for biological processes - the 'secret of life' - may need some further revision Alex Taylor A team of researchers have created the world's first enzymes made from artificial genetic material.

Chemistry - Physics - 26.11.2014
Protons fuel graphene prospects
Our structure (research) Impact of our research Postgraduate research 26 Nov 2014 Graphene, impermeable to all gases and liquids, can easily allow protons to pass through it, University of Manchester researchers have found. Published in the journal Nature , the discovery could revolutionise fuel cells and other hydrogen-based technologies as they require a barrier that only allow protons – hydrogen atoms stripped off their electrons – to pass through.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.11.2014
New similarities and differences between mice and humans
Powerful clues have been discovered about why the human immune system, metabolism, stress response, and other life functions are so different from those of the mouse. A new, comprehensive study of the mouse genome by an international group of researchers including Penn State University scientists reveals striking similarities and differences with the human genome.

Chemistry - Physics - 19.11.2014
Spiraling light, nanoparticles and insights into life's structure
Spiraling light, nanoparticles and insights into life’s structure
ANN ARBOR-As hands come in left and right versions that are mirror images of each other, so do the amino acids and sugars within us. But unlike hands, only the left-oriented amino acids and the right-oriented sugars ever make into life as we know it. Scientists know the other varieties exist because when they synthesize these amino acids and sugars in a lab, roughly equal numbers of leftand right-facing arrangements form.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.11.2014
Similarities and differences between mice and humans revealed
Powerful clues have been discovered about why the human immune system, metabolism, stress response, and other life functions are so different from those of the mouse. A new, comprehensive study of the mouse genome by an international group of researchers including Penn State University scientists reveals striking similarities and differences with the human genome.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 18.11.2014
A novel method for identifying the body’s ’noisiest’ networks
A team of scientists led by Yale University systems biologist and biomedical engineer Andre Levchenko has developed a novel method for mapping the biochemical variability, or "noise," in how human cells respond to chemical signals. The research, published Nov. 17 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, could be used to tailor drug delivery to a patient's individual cell responses and may have further implications for advances in semiconductor chip design.

Chemistry - Event - 18.11.2014
Molecular event mapping opens door to more tests "in silico"
Scientists report a new method for establishing whether chemical compounds are safe for human use without "in vivo" testing, based on so-called "molecular initiating events" at the boundary between chemistry and biology.

Chemistry - Health - 18.11.2014
Finding new ways to make drugs '
Finding new ways to make drugs »
Chemists have developed a revolutionary new way to manufacture natural chemicals and used it to assemble a scarce anti-inflammatory drug with potential to treat cancer and malaria. The breakthrough could lead to new and cheaper ways to produce rare drugs in large quantities. "We took small molecules and clipped them together like Lego," said lead researcher Professor Michael Sherburn, from the Research School of Chemistry.

Chemistry - Physics - 17.11.2014
Stanford chemists develop 'nanoreactor' for discovering new chemical reactions
Stanford chemists develop ’nanoreactor’ for discovering new chemical reactions
A new computer model could identify unknown chemical mechanisms that could improve energy production and storage, or the development of new medicines. In 1952, the famous Urey-Miller experiment mixed together chemicals that were present early in Earth's history, then approximately replicated the environmental conditions on the planet at that time to see if biologically relevant organic molecules would form spontaneously.

Health - Chemistry - 17.11.2014
The Dirty Side of Soap
Triclosan is an antimicrobial additive found in many liquid hand soaps and other household products. Image source: Arlington County Triclosan is an antimicrobial commonly found in soaps, shampoos, toothpastes and many other household items. Despite its widespread use, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report potentially serious consequences of long-term exposure to the chemical.
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