news 2014

« BACK

Social Sciences



Results 101 - 120 of 185.


Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 13.06.2014
Trigger to decode the genome
09 Jul 2014 A PhD student from the University of Manchester has launched a social media platform which she hopes will help researchers at the start of their careers.

Social Sciences - 11.06.2014
World Cup football is a risk factor for domestic violence
Domestic abuse increases during England World Cup football matches - especially if the team loses. Researchers analysed figures from Lancashire Constabulary across three tournaments in 2002, 2006, and 2010. After controlling for day of the week, incidents of domestic abuse rose by 38 per cent in Lancashire when the England team played and lost and increased by 26 per cent when the England national team played and won or drew compared with days when there was no England match.

Health - Social Sciences - 11.06.2014
Nearly 1 in 8 American children are maltreated before age 18
University of Washington By the time they reach age 18, nearly one in eight - about 12 percent - of American children experience a confirmed case of maltreatment in the form of neglect or physical, sexual or emotional abuse. These findings, published June 2 in JAMA Pediatrics , are the first to document the national cumulative prevalence of child maltreatment based on cases confirmed by child protective services.

Social Sciences - 11.06.2014
Recession 'link' with over 10,000 suicides in the West
The recent recession can be linked with over 10,000 suicides across Europe and North America between 2008 and 2010, according to research by the University of Oxford and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. The findings, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry , show that suicide rates rose significantly in the EU, Canada and the USA after 2007, with the increase being four times higher among men.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 11.06.2014
Newly discovered paddle prints show how ancient sea reptiles swam
Press release issued: 11 June 2014 Trackways formed on an ancient seabed have shed new light on how nothosaurs, ancient marine reptiles that lived during the age of the dinosaurs, propelled themselves through water. The evidence is described by a team from Bristol and China today. During the Mesozoic, 252-66 million years ago, the seas were ruled by a variety of marine reptiles.

Social Sciences - 11.06.2014
Currency top of #indyref tweeter’s agenda
The currency is the issue most tweeted about under the #indyref hashtag, according to new research from the University of Glasgow. In Policy Scotland's latest analysis examining Twitter and the independence referendum debate, the team have moved from who is participating in the debate to exploring what is being discussed.

Social Sciences - Economics - 11.06.2014
Power of star journalists
The power of key journalists in helping drive traffic to online news brands has been revealed in a new study published by the University of Oxford. The Reuters Institute Digital News Report,  based on YouGov surveys of more than 18,000 people in 10 countries, shows that the reputation of individual writers was cited as one of the few reasons why people might be prepared to pay for online news.

Social Sciences - 09.06.2014
Identifying with a crowd can increase crowd safety, Sussex study finds
Identifying with a crowd can increase crowd safety, Sussex study finds
Identifying with a crowd can increase crowd safety, Sussex study finds Feelings of safety for those attending one of the world's largest annual religious gatherings is dependent on how much they can identify with the crowd, according to a University of Sussex study. More than three million Muslim pilgrims travel annually to Mecca for the Hajj.

Social Sciences - Health - 02.06.2014
Suicides Are Far More Likely to Occur After Midnight
A new study by researchers at Penn Medicine is the first to reveal that suicides are far more likely to occur between midnight and 4 a.m. than during the daytime or evening. The research abstract was published recently in an online supplement of the journal Sleep and will be presented at SLEEP 2014, the 28th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC.

Social Sciences - Health - 02.06.2014
Social Integration Improves Lung Function in Elderly
Press Release: Carnegie Mellon Researchers Discover Social Integration Improves Lung Function in Elderly-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University Study Also Rebuffs Popular Notion That Marriage Is Only Social Role That Benefits Health : Shilo Rea / 412-268-6094 / shilo [a] cmu (p) edu PITTSBURGH—It is well established that being involved in more social roles, such as being married, having close friends, close family members, and belonging to social and religious groups, leads to better mental and physical health.

Health - Social Sciences - 02.06.2014
Nearly one in eight American children are maltreated before age 18
By the time they reach age 18, about 12% of American children experience a confirmed case of maltreatment in the form of neglect, physical, sexual, or emotional abuse, according to a new study by researchers at Yale University. The numbers are even more sobering for black and Native American children, with one in five black children and one in seven Native American children experiencing maltreatment during the time period studied.

Health - Social Sciences - 29.05.2014
Study Highlights Significant Side Effects Experienced by BRCA Mutation Carriers Following Cancer Risk-Reducing Surgical Procedure
The majority of women with cancer causing BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations experience sexual dysfunction, menopausal symptoms, cognitive and stress issues, and poor sleep following prophylactic removal of their Fallopian tubes and ovaries - a procedure known as risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) - according to results of a new study from the Abramson Cancer Center and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Social Sciences - Health - 28.05.2014
Negative Social Interactions Increase Hypertension Risk In Older Adults, Carnegie Mellon Researchers Find
Press Release: Negative Social Interactions Increase Hypertension Risk In Older Adults, Carnegie Mellon Researchers Find-Carnegie Mellon News - Carnegie Mellon University Women More Affected By Negative Social Interactions Than Men : Shilo Rea / 412-268-6094 / shilo [a] cmu (p) edu PITTSBURGH—Keeping your friends close and your enemies closer may not be the best advice if you are 50 or older.

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 26.05.2014
For a better sex life, try a little tenderness
Want a more satisfying sex life and a better relationship with your partner? More post-sex cuddling will do the trick, especially for couples who are parents, according to new research from the University of Toronto Mississauga. UTM sexuality and relationship researcher Amy Muise studied the effects of after-sex behavior in monogamous romantic relationships.

Social Sciences - Event - 22.05.2014
Twitter shows love for Lee Rigby
Scientists studying the social media activity in the immediate aftermath of Lee Rigby's murder have found that messages loaded with racial tension and hate were far less likely to spread than those infused with love. By collecting half a million tweets related to the attack via Twitter, academics from the University's Collaborative Online Social Media Observatory ( COSMOS ) were able to statistically model how the public reacted and have published their findings in the international peer-reviewed journal Social Network Analysis and Mining.

Social Sciences - Health - 22.05.2014
Why ’Alternative’ teenagers self harm: exploring the link between non-suicidal self injury, attempted suicide and adolescent identity
Medical Research Council Why 'Alternative' teenagers self harm: exploring the link between non-suicidal self-injury, attempted suicide and adolescent identity Around half (45.5%) of 'Alternative'* teenagers self-injure and nearly 1 in 5 (17.2%) attempt suicide, according to scientists at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow and researchers from the University of Ulm, Germany.

Health - Social Sciences - 22.05.2014
Newly separated most at risk of suicidal thoughts
Newly separated most at risk of suicidal thoughts
Men and women are most likely to have suicidal thoughts within a year of a marriage or de-facto relationship breakup, new ANU research has found. The vulnerability may be due to the trauma of the breakup, along with subsequent changes in social networks affecting people's sense of belonging, said lead author of the study Dr Philip Batterham, from the ANU Centre for Mental Health Research.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 20.05.2014
Why do people commit mass murder?
Neurodevelopmental and psychosocial risk factors in serial killers and mass murderers Institute of Health and Wellbeing Mental health specialists at the University of Glasgow have conducted the first review of published research into what causes people to undertake serial killings and mass murder. The report, which is the first of its kind to look at all the available material around serial and mass killers, identified that a complex interplay between neurodevelopmental problems and psychosocial factors are most likely to lead to incidences of this kind.

Social Sciences - Astronomy / Space - 19.05.2014
Antarctica’s ice losses on the rise
Antarctica’s ice losses on the rise
Three years of observations show that the Antarctic ice sheet is now losing 159 billion tonnes of ice each year - twice as much as when it was last surveyed. A team of scientists from the UK Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling, led by researchers at the University of Leeds, have produced the first complete assessment of Antarctic ice sheet elevation change.

Social Sciences - 16.05.2014
Research proves how much we distrust people who are mean with money
We distrust people who are mean with their money, according to the findings of a series of lab experiments conducted at Oxford University. The study participants had no face-to-face but played a series of interactive games. They had to make decisions about whom to trust in their dealings with other players, based on information they were given on the level of these other players' generosity in previous games.