news 2014

« BACK

Social Sciences



Results 81 - 100 of 185.


Social Sciences - Administration - 05.08.2014
The surprising ’balloon mania' of Romantic literature
A new study suggests that the 2013 reforms aimed at relaxing China's 'one-child policy' are likely to have little effect on the country's long-term demographic trends and the problem of China's shrinking workforce. It explores why China has only partially lifted its family planning restrictions, suggesting that local governments rely on the income from fines imposed on couples who violate the one-child policy, known as 'social maintenance fees'.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 29.07.2014
Team studies the social origins of intelligence in the brain
University of Illinois neuroscience professor Aron Barbey and his colleagues found that brain regions that contribute to social problem solving also play a role in general intelligence. CHAMPAIGN, Ill. By studying the injuries and aptitudes of Vietnam War veterans who suffered penetrating head wounds during the war, scientists are tackling - and beginning to answer - longstanding questions about how the brain works.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 29.07.2014
Team studies the social origins of intelligence in the brain
University of Illinois neuroscience professor Aron Barbey and his colleagues found that brain regions that contribute to social problem solving also play a role in general intelligence. CHAMPAIGN, Ill. By studying the injuries and aptitudes of Vietnam War veterans who suffered penetrating head wounds during the war, scientists are tackling - and beginning to answer - longstanding questions about how the brain works.

Social Sciences - Health - 24.07.2014
Decriminalising sex work would cut HIV infections by a third
Decriminalising sex work would cut HIV infections by a third
The legal and social environment for sex workers must be addressed alongside medical interventions to stop the spread of HIV, researchers say. Mathematical modelling work by Drs Michael Pickles and Marie-Claude Boily from Imperial College London estimates that decriminalising sex work could prevent up to 33 to 46 per cent of HIV infections among female sex workers (FSWs) and clients worldwide over the next decade.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 16.07.2014
Males and females with autism show an extreme of the typical male mind
The largest ever psychological study of sex differences in adults with autism has found that both males and females with autism on average show an extreme of the typical male mind, where systemising (the drive to look for underlying rules in a system) is stronger than empathising (the ability to recognize the thoughts and feelings of others and to respond to these with appropriate emotions).

Social Sciences - Career - 16.07.2014
Sexual harassment and assault are common on scientific field studies, survey indicates
University of Illinois anthropology professor Kathryn Clancy led a new study of sexual harassment and assault of men and women working on scientific field studies. CHAMPAIGN, Ill. A survey of 142 men and 516 women with experience in field studies in anthropology, archaeology, geology and other scientific disciplines reveals that many of them - particularly the younger ones - suffered or witnessed sexual harassment or sexual assault while at work in the field.

Social Sciences - Career - 16.07.2014
Sexual harassment and assault are common on scientific field studies, survey indicates
University of Illinois anthropology professor Kathryn Clancy led a new study of sexual harassment and assault of men and women working on scientific field studies. CHAMPAIGN, Ill. A survey of 142 men and 516 women with experience in field studies in anthropology, archaeology, geology and other scientific disciplines reveals that many of them - particularly the younger ones - suffered or witnessed sexual harassment or sexual assault while at work in the field.

Social Sciences - 16.07.2014
People in leadership positions may sacrifice privacy for security
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. People with higher job status may be more willing to compromise privacy for security reasons and also be more determined to carry out those decisions, according to researchers. This preoccupation with security may shape policy and decision-making in areas ranging from terrorism to investing, and perhaps cloud other options, said Jens Grossklags , assistant professor of i nformation sciences and technology , Penn State.

Social Sciences - Economics - 14.07.2014
Intoxication played bigger role in suicide deaths during economic downturn
Intoxication played bigger role in suicide deaths during economic downturn
People who committed suicide during the Great Recession of 2008 and 2009 were more likely to have been legally intoxicated at the time than those who committed suicide during other recent years, according to research led by UCLA professor Mark Kaplan. Although one-third of all people who commit suicide are intoxicated at the time of their deaths, extensive research has shown that individuals who are unemployed or at risk of unemployment in a down economy are at increased risk for suicide.

Astronomy / Space Science - Social Sciences - 10.07.2014
Arecibo captures its first 'fast radio burst'
Arecibo captures its first 'fast radio burst'
The Arecibo Observatory has captured one of the most fleeting, mysterious and rare deep-space events - a so-called "fast radio burst" (FRB) that lasted a mere three one-thousandths of a second. Cornell, McGill University and other astronomers report this peculiar event today (July 10) in the Astrophysical Journal.

Social Sciences - 07.07.2014
Peer pressure affects consumption
Are your attitudes toward certain foods shaped by peer pressure rather than science? Recent research conducted by Cornell suggests that's the case. While some ingredient food fears are justified by objective evidence, others have demonized ingredients and damaged industries. Researchers at the university's Food and Brand Lab surveyed 1,008 mothers about their attitudes toward high fructose corn syrup and other ingredients.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 07.07.2014
Sociable weavers show everybody needs good neighbours
New insight into how sociable weavers work together in large groups to build and maintain nests and keep freeloaders at bay Despite few birds within a group being related, birds co-operate within a communal nest to achieve a common good First study to show that kin selection may promote communal construction A new insight into one of the biggest questions in science - why some animals, including humans, work together to maintain a common good - has been achieved by scientists at the University of Sheffield.

Environment - Social Sciences - 29.06.2014
High CO2 levels cause warming in the tropics
Press release issued: 29 June 2014 Higher concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere cause warming not only at high latitudes but also across tropical regions, according to new research by scientists at the University of Bristol's Cabot Institute and their collaborators. The impact of the greenhouse gas CO2 on the Earth's temperature is well established by climate models and temperature records over the past 100 years, as well as coupled records of carbon dioxide concentration and temperature throughout Earth history.

Social Sciences - Administration - 25.06.2014
Some good practices, but more evidence needed to prevent reoffending against women
Violence against women: effective interventions and practices with perpetrators: A literature review The Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research Whilst there are a range of good practices in criminal justice responses to violence against women, there is limited evidence when it comes to effective interventions to reduce reoffending by perpetrators, a literature review has found.

Social Sciences - Health - 24.06.2014
Poor outlook for ex-prisoners, new research finds
People with a history of mental disorder experience particularly poor outcomes following release from prison, a new Australian study has found. In one of the largest and most comprehensive studies ever conducted, University of Melbourne researchers and interstate collaborators analysed the severity and complexity of the health-related needs of former prisoners.

Social Sciences - Health - 18.06.2014
Acute alcohol misuse among suicidal people
One-third of all suicides in the U.S. involve acute use of alcohol before the fatal attempt, according to a study led by UCLA social welfare professor Mark Kaplan. The researchers say the findings underscore the need to link suicide prevention and alcohol-control strategies. The study is the first to compare alcohol use among those who committed suicide with that of a nationally representative survey of non-suicidal adults in the United States.

Health - Social Sciences - 18.06.2014
Death by prescription painkiller
The number of deaths involving commonly prescribed painkillers is higher than the number of deaths by overdose from heroin and cocaine combined, according to researchers at McGill University. In a first-of-its-kind review of existing research, the McGill team has put the spotlight on a major public health problem: the dramatic increase in deaths due to prescribed painkillers, which were involved in more than 16,000 deaths in 2010 in the U.S. alone.

Social Sciences - Health - 18.06.2014
Suicide among mental health patients receiving home treatment doubles
18 Jun 2014 The number of deaths by suicide among mental health patients treated at home by crisis resolution home treatment teams (CRHT)*, has more than doubled in England in recent years, rising from an average of 80 in 2003-2004 to 163 in 2010-2011, according to new research by The University of Manchester.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 16.06.2014
Historians become scientists to reveal the real reason for a decline in violent crime
Historians become scientists to reveal the real reason for a decline in violent crime
Historians become scientists to reveal the real reason for a decline in violent crime A scientific analysis of 20 million words recorded during 150 years of criminal trials at London's Old Bailey reveals how changes in culture rather than law helped to reduce violent crime, according to a co-authored University of Sussex study published today (16 June 2014).

Social Sciences - 16.06.2014
Research helps Mongolia tackle gender violence
Research helps Mongolia tackle gender violence
New research from The University of Queensland has helped find practical solutions to gender-based violence issues stemming from Mongolia's mining boom. A UQ Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining research project has helped prompt a $280,000 Memorandum of Understanding between Mongolia's National Committee on Gender Equality and the Erdenes Tavan Tolgoi mining company.