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Results 21 - 40 of 3213.


Environment - Life Sciences - 22.12.2016
Global warming disrupts fish stocks
Global warming disrupts fish stocks
The global catches of fishes would largely benefit from achieving the 1.5°C global warming target.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2016
Forces at play: A new infection route for bacteria
Forces at play: A new infection route for bacteria
Snapshots from a Molecular Dynamics simulation of a single shigella toxin particle binding to its lipid partners in the vesicle membrane (side and top views).

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2016
New disease could signal hope for sufferers of brain ageing conditions
New disease could signal hope for sufferers of brain ageing conditions
New disease could signal hope for sufferers of brain ageing conditions A new genetic disease which results in neurodegeneration has been discovered by experts at the University of Sussex. In a study published today, Wednesday 21 December, in the top scientific journal Nature, the team from the University of Sussex's Genome Damage and Stability Centre (GDSC) reveal they have discovered the disease, ataxia oculomotor apraxia type XRCC1 , which is caused by a genetic mutation that disrupts the repair of our DNA.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 21.12.2016
Light-induced vesicle explosions to mimic cellular reactions
Light-induced vesicle explosions to mimic cellular reactions
Cells are the site of a multitude of chemical reactions, the precision of which is envied by scientists.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.12.2016
Materials: when defects turn into qualities
Materials: when defects turn into qualities
Hybrid organic-inorganic materials, which were developed approximately twenty years ago – notably by Gérard Férey, laureate of the CNRS 2010 Gold Medal, and his team – are known firstly for their extreme porosity. This remarkable property offers a diverse range of applications in the fields of energy, health, and sustainable development.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2016
Optical control of a neuroreceptor alleviates chronic pain
Optical control of a neuroreceptor alleviates chronic pain
Pain serves as a valuable warning signal, but when it becomes chronic, pain should be considered as a real disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2016
Stressed snakes strike first
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Whether a wild cottonmouth snake will attempt to strike in an encounter depends on its baseline stress level, according to a team of scientists led by undergraduate researcher Mark Herr. "Most people think a snake is more likely to strike after you have handled or harassed it," said Tracy Langkilde , professor and department head of biology.

Administration - Health - 21.12.2016
NHS hospitals that outsource cleaning ‘linked with higher rates of MRSA’
New research shows that NHS hospitals that employ private cleaners are associated with a higher incidence of MRSA, a 'superbug' that causes life-threatening infection and has previously been linked with a lack of cleanliness. The superbug is becoming increasingly difficult to treat. As from 2005, trusts have been required to regularly report incidents of MRSA, which has enabled researchers to produce empirical evidence for the first time that compares the rates of infection in hospitals that outsource cleaning with those using in-house cleaners.

Agronomy / Food Science - 21.12.2016
Turn an ear to hear
Listeners in a noisy situation benefit from facing slightly away from the person they are listening to, turning one ear towards the speech, concludes a study by Cardiff University, funded by UK charity Action on Hearing Loss (RNID). This listening tactic was found to be especially beneficial for cochlear implant users who typically struggle in noisy social settings such as restaurants.

Social Sciences - 21.12.2016
Children can 'catch' social bias through nonverbal signals expressed by adults
Children can ‘catch’ social bias through nonverbal signals expressed by adults
Most conscientious adults tend to avoid making biased or discriminatory comments in the presence of children. But new research from the University of Washington suggests that preschool-aged children can learn bias even through nonverbal signals displayed by adults, such as a condescending tone of voice or a disapproving look.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2016
Distinctive brain pattern may underlie dyslexia
Distinctive brain pattern may underlie dyslexia
A distinctive neural signature found in the brains of people with dyslexia may explain why these individuals have difficulty learning to read, according to a new study from MIT neuroscientists. The researchers discovered that in people with dyslexia, the brain has a diminished ability to acclimate to a repeated input - a trait known as neural adaptation.

Art and Design - 21.12.2016
Kids think stereotypes reflect how world should be
ANN ARBOR'Once children believe that a group is characterized by a certain trait, they think individual people within that group should also be judged by that trait, according to a University of Michigan study. U-M researchers introduced participants to unfamiliar groups?"Hibbles" and "Glerks"?who differed from each other in harmless behaviors, such as the kind of food they eat, language they speak, music they listen to and games they play.

Environment - 21.12.2016
’Belief in climate change found to be influenced by the local weather’
New research finds local temperatures may play an important role in whether people believe in climate change. The study, published in the  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , found that of the Americans surveyed, belief that the earth is warming related to the frequency of record-high and record-low temperatures they had experienced themselves.

Health - Chemistry - 21.12.2016
One more piece in the puzzle of liver cancer identified
One more piece in the puzzle of liver cancer identified
Manuela Baccarini and her team at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of the University of Vienna and Medical University of Vienna are one step closer to unravelling the mechanisms behind liver cancer. The researchers discovered that RAF1, a protein known as an oncogene in other systems, unexpectedly acts as a tumour suppressor in hepatocellular carcinoma.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.12.2016
'Glue' that makes plant cell walls strong could hold the key to wooden skyscrapers
‘Glue’ that makes plant cell walls strong could hold the key to wooden skyscrapers
Molecules 10,000 times narrower than the width of a human hair could hold the key to making possible wooden skyscrapers and more energy-efficient paper production, according to research published today . The study, led by a father and son team at the Universities of Warwick and Cambridge, solves a long-standing mystery of how key sugars in cells bind to form strong, indigestible materials.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.12.2016
The blob can learn—and teach!
The blob can learn—and teach!
It isn't an animal, a plant, or a fungus. The slime mold ( Physarum polycephalum ) is a strange, creeping, bloblike organism made up of one giant cell. Though it has no brain, it can learn from experience, as biologists at the Research Centre on Animal Cognition (CNRS, Université Toulouse III—Paul Sabatier) previously demonstrated.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2016
Aging & cancer: An enzyme protects chromosomes from oxidative damage
Aging & cancer: An enzyme protects chromosomes from oxidative damage
EPFL scientists have identified a protein that caps chromosomes during cell division and protects them from oxidative damage and shortening, which are associated with aging and cancer. When cells divide, they pack up all of their genetic material in the tightly wrapped chromosomes. The ends of our chromosomes have a unique structure, named a telomere.

Physics - Electroengineering - 21.12.2016
Graphene able to transport huge currents on the nano scale
Graphene able to transport huge currents on the nano scale
New experiments have shown that it is possible for extremely high currents to pass through graphene, a form of carbon. This allows imbalances in electric charge to be rapidly rectified. The strong electric field of the highly charged ions is able to tear dozens of electrons away from the graphene within a matter of femtoseconds.

Life Sciences - 21.12.2016
Store and Supply - How the Brain Saves Time
Store and Supply - How the Brain Saves Time
Neurons in the brain store RNA molecules - DNA gene copies - in order to rapidly react to stimuli. This storage dramatically accelerates the production of proteins. This is one of the reasons why neurons in the brain can adapt quickly during learning processes. The recent results of a research group at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have been published in the current issue of 'Neuron'.

Astronomy / Space Science - 21.12.2016
ANU helps find supercluster of galaxies near Milky Way
This is one of the biggest concentrations of galaxies in the Universe - possibly the biggest in the neighbourhood of our Galaxy. ANU Professor Matthew Colless is part of an international team of astronomers that found one of the Universe's biggest superclusters of galaxies near the Milky Way. Professor Colless said the Vela supercluster, which had previously gone undetected as it was hidden by stars and dust in the Milky Way, was a huge mass that influenced the motion of our Galaxy.