news 2016


Category

Years
2021 | 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008



Results 41 - 60 of 3213.


Life Sciences - Administration - 21.12.2016
Jaws open long-term shark population information
An international study led by University of Queensland researchers seeks to understand how white and tiger shark populations have changed over time. UQ School of Biomedical Sciences' Associate Professor Jenny Ovenden and Professor Mike Bennett hope the project will provide a better understanding of shark population sizes and potential changes in their distributions, information that is likely to help with the species' conservation and management.

Health - Materials Science - 21.12.2016
Top Los Alamos science stories of 2016
Top Los Alamos science stories of 2016
From discoveries on Mars to breakthroughs in cancer research, from national security science to materials science, 2016 has proven to be another productive year for Los Alamos National Laboratory achievements. "This year's significant advancements in high-performance computing, materials science, cancer research as well as national security, space exploration and nuclear nonproliferation science underscore the Lab's unique multidisciplinary scientific capabilities," said Alan Bishop.

Philosophy - 21.12.2016
Emojis’ So does the rest of the world
ANN ARBOR?People worldwide love , except the French, who prefer , according to a new study of global emoji usage. Researchers at the University of Michigan and Peking University analyzed 427 million messages from nearly 4 million smartphone users in 212 countries and regions to see if emoji use was universal or differed based on user location and culture.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.12.2016
Gene discovery helps children with movement disorder walk again
Gene discovery helps children with movement disorder walk again
UCL researchers have discovered a new genetic cause for dystonia, a movement disorder, enabling treatment with Deep Brain Stimulation which has been so successful that children have been able to walk again. The team of researchers from UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University of Cambridge and the NIHR Rare Disease Bioresource have identified mutations in a gene, called KMT2B, in 28 patients with dystonia.  In most cases, the patients - many of whom were young children who were thought to have a diagnosis of cerebral palsy - were unable to walk.

Environment - 20.12.2016
Unexamined risks from tar sands oil may threaten oceans
Unexamined risks from tar sands oil may threaten oceans
A lack of publicly available information about the chemical composition of fuel mined from tar sands hampers efforts to safeguard marine habitats. A new analysis recommends that officials gain a better understanding of the fuel's environmental impacts before setting regulations. As President-elect Donald Trump prepares to overhaul energy and environmental regulations, a troubling question hangs over an emerging source of unconventional oil Trump has indicated he wants to expand.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2016
Researchers model how 'publication bias' does - and doesn't - affect the 'canonization' of facts in science
Researchers model how ’publication bias’ does - and doesn’t - affect the ’canonization’ of facts in science
Arguing in a Boston courtroom in 1770, John Adams famously pronounced , "Facts are stubborn things,” which cannot be altered by "our wishes, our inclinations or the dictates of our passion.” But facts, however stubborn, must pass through the trials of human perception before being acknowledged - or "canonized” - as facts.

Life Sciences - 20.12.2016
A double agent to fight hepatitis C
A double agent to fight hepatitis C
Immunostaining of three proteins (in blue, red and green) from hepatitis C virus that replicates within the cytoplasm of an infected cell.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.12.2016
Brain begins repairs after 'silent strokes'
Brain begins repairs after ‘silent strokes’
UCLA researchers have shown that the brain can be repaired — and brain function can be recovered — after a stroke in animals. The discovery could have important implications for treating a mind-robbing condition known as a white matter stroke, a major cause of dementia. White matter stroke is a type of ischemic stroke, in which a blood vessel carrying oxygen to the brain is blocked.

Physics - Electroengineering - 20.12.2016
Scientists detect a quantum crystal of electrons and 'watch' it melt
Scientists detect a quantum crystal of electrons and ‘watch’ it melt
For the first time, MIT physicists have observed a highly ordered crystal of electrons in a semiconducting material and documented its melting, much like ice thawing into water. The observations confirm a fundamental phase transition in quantum mechanics that was theoretically proposed more than 80 years ago but not experimentally documented until now.

Health - Civil Engineering - 20.12.2016
New research helps harness healing
New research helps harness healing
The discovery of a regenerative stem cell active in human blood vessels could help patients with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The University of Queensland Dr Jatin Patel said the finding overcomes one of the biggest hurdles in understanding cardiovascular disease and how wounds heal. "It will allow research to focus on improving the use of blood vessels which are often under strain in patients with conditions like cardiovascular disease and diabetes," Dr Patel said.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.12.2016
Alzheimer’s Advance: study in mice show new drugs that restore memory loss and prolong life
An international team of scientists has announced a new advance in the fight against Alzheimer's disease by identifying a new drug target for not only improving symptoms of brain degeneration - but also to extend the life-span of the terminally ill mice. The four-year study by Medical Research Council (MRC) scientists based at the MRC Toxicology Unit at the University of Leicester is published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2016
An inhibitor's inhibitor
An inhibitor’s inhibitor
An international team of researchers has shown why a standard treatment for the aggressive blood-cell cancer AML so often fails. The study uncovers a new biomarker that predicts the efficacy of the chemotherapy and identifies a new drug target. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer that is characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of certain types of white blood cells.

Physics - Chemistry - 19.12.2016
Physicists shine light on antimatter
Scientists from the University of Liverpool as part of CERN's ALPHA collaboration have made the first spectroscopic measurement of an atom of antimatter - a longstanding goal in antimatter physics. Published , this finding represents a significant step towards the development of highly precise tests of whether matter behaves differently from antimatter.

Earth Sciences - 19.12.2016
Megathrust earthquakes
The raggedness of the ocean floors could be the key to triggering some of the Earth's most powerful earthquakes, scientists from Cardiff University have discovered. In a new study published today the team, also from Utrecht University, suggest that large bumps and mounds on the sea floor could be the trigger point that causes the crust in the Earth's oceans to drastically slip beneath the crust on the continent and generate a giant earthquake.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2016
Patients show considerable improvements after treatment for newly-defined movement disorder
Patients show considerable improvements after treatment for newly-defined movement disorder
DNA sequencing has defined a new genetic disorder that affects movement, enabling patients with dystonia - a disabling condition that affects voluntary movement - to be targeted for treatment that brings remarkable improvements, including restoring independent walking.

Chemistry - 19.12.2016
Earliest evidence discovered of plants cooked in ancient pottery
Earliest evidence discovered of plants cooked in ancient pottery
A team of international scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has uncovered the earliest direct evidence of humans processing plants for food found anywhere in the world. Researchers at the Organic Geochemistry Unit in the University of Bristol's School of Chemistry , working with colleagues at Sapienza, University of Rome and the Universities of Modena and Milan, studied unglazed pottery dating from more than 10,000 years ago, from two sites in the Libyan Sahara.

Physics - 19.12.2016
Building Better Batteries
Building Better Batteries
Lithium-ion batteries, widely used in devices ranging from electric cars to iPhones, are composed of a cathode made from a positively charged lithium compound and an anode composed of negatively charged carbon. Ideally, anodes would be made of lithium metal, which can store more energy than carbon. However, lithium metal anodes have a serious flaw'over time, the lithium metal grows dendrites, tiny needle-like branching structures that can grow through the battery causing it to short-circuit or even explode.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2016
DNA markers distinguish between harmless, deadly bacteria
DNA markers distinguish between harmless, deadly bacteria
The virulent pathogen that causes the disease tularemia, or "rabbit fever," was weaponized during past world wars and is considered a potential bioweapon. "This large study is particularly notable for having used 31 publicly available genomes plus select genes from about 90 additional isolates," said corresponding author Cheryl Kuske.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 19.12.2016
Dust Bowl would devastate today’s crops, study finds
A drought on the scale of the legendary Dust Bowl crisis of the 1930s would have similarly destructive effects on U.S. agriculture today, despite technological and agricultural advances, a new study finds. Additionally, warming temperatures could lead to crop losses at the scale of the Dust Bowl, even in normal precipitation years by the mid-21st century, UChicago scientists conclude.

Health - 19.12.2016
Neglect and abuse in childhood could have long-term economic consequences
Neglect and abuse in childhood could have long-term economic consequences
People who suffer neglect and abuse in childhood are much more likely to have time off work due to long-term sickness and less likely to own their own homes when they reach middle age than their peers, according to new research undertaken at UCL. The study, which is published in U.S. journal Pediatrics and undertaken as part of the Public Health Research Consortium, showed that the potential socioeconomic impact of child neglect and abuse may persist for decades.